Ford Mondeo Vignale 2.0L Duratorq 180PS Diesel Automatic 5 door Estate (2016) at Ford Wimbledon

This Mondeo Vignale features a start / stop engine, Ford's Sync3 system with satellite navigation, a DAB radio, Bluetooth, rear view camera, full leather interior with heated front seats, keyless start and entry, front and rear parking sensors, automated parking system, opening panoramic roof, lane keeping aid, blind spot recognition, automatic headlights and windscreen wipers, rear privacy glass, cruise control, dual zone air conditioning, a heated windscreen, a trip computer, full electric windows, steering wheel mounted audio controls and Vignale spec alloy wheels. This car also qualifies for our exclusive RAC backed Warranty4Life*

20/09/2016

21807

Automatic

Diesel 37.2 combined MPG

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Location: Ford Wimbledon - Stock At This Dealer

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open quoteThis Mondeo Vignale is currently being run as one of our demonstration vehicles, book yourself a test drive nowclose quote

CO2: 176 g/km

MPG: 37.2

V5 Document

V5 Document

MOT Certificate

MOT Certificate

Keys

Keys

Manuals

Manuals

Service Log Book

Service Log Book

Body Glass

'Quickclear' heated windscreen/heated washer jets, Electric front windows, Electric rear windows with global closing, Laminated acoustic side glass, Rear privacy glass, Rear wiper

Brakes

ABS+EBA, Active city stop, Electronic parking brake, ESP + traction control, Hill start assist

Carpets/Rugs

Floor mats

Communication

Bluetooth connectivity with voice control

Driver Aids

Front and rear parking sensors, Lane keep assist with traffic sign recognition, auto dimming interior mirror, automatic headlights and wipers, PAS, Rear view camera

Driver Convenience

'Ford Power' starter button, Easy fuel capless refuelling system, Power tailgate

Driver Information

Ford SYNC 3 with 8" colour touch screen, Service indicator, Sony DAB navigation system with 12 speakers, SYNC Emergency Assistance, Trip computer

Driving Mirrors

Electric adjustable door mirrors, Electric folding door mirrors

Embellishment Trims

Leather console lid, Leather instrument panel

Entertainment

Radio/CD, USB socket

Exterior Body Features

Body colour rocker mouldings, Body coloured bumpers, Chrome insert to door handles, Chrome lower and rear side bumper strips, Chrome roof rails, Chrome window surround, Dark finish front grille, Rear spoiler

Exterior Lights

Dynamic LED adaptive headlights, Front fog lights with chrome surrounds, LED daytime running lights, LED tail lights, Puddle lights

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Dual zone automatic climate control

Interior Features

Centre console with armrest, Dark headlining, Heated steering wheel, Leather door panels, Leather steering wheel, Premium leather upholstery, Rear armrest, Ski hatch, Tonneau cover

Interior Lights

Ambient lighting

Safety

3x3 point rear seatbelts, Curtain airbags, Driver/front passenger airbag, Drivers knee airbag, Intelligent Protection System (IPS), Tyre pressure monitoring system

Seats

10 way electrically adjustable drivers seat, Driver seat memory function, Driver's lumbar support, Folding rear seats, Front headrests, Heated front seats, Height adjustable passenger seat with lumbar support, Isofix on 2nd row rear seats, Rear headrests, Sports seats

Security

Immobiliser, Keyless entry and start, Remote central double locking, Thatcham Cat.1 alarm

Wheels - Alloy

19" Dark Tarnish alloy wheels

General

Badge Engine CC: 2.0
Badge Power: 240
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: EcoBoost
Coin Series: N
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 29E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 1
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 86
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 82
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 5
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 66
NCAP Safety Assist %: 66
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 12500
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 60000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: 120
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: 125000
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions

CO: 0.315
CO2 (g/km): 176
HC: 0.033
HC+NOx: N
Noise Level dB(A): 74
NOx: 0.014
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1999
Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 87.5
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 83.1
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: TURBO DIRECT INJECTION
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: AUTO

Fuel Consumption

EC Combined (mpg): 37.2
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 47.9
EC Urban (mpg): 27.2

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 8
Engine Power - BHP: 240
Engine Power - KW: 176
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 5400
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 251
Engine Torque - MKG: 35.2
Engine Torque - NM: 340
Engine Torque - RPM: 2300
Top Speed: 146

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Space Saver?: True
Tyre Size Spare: SPACE SAVER
Wheel Style: 10 SPOKE
Wheel Type: 19" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1501
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 4867
Wheelbase: 2850
Width: 1852
Width (including mirrors): 2121

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 75
Gross Vehicle Weight: 2230
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1605
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 500
Max. Loading Weight: 646
Max. Roof Load: 75
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 1800
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 750
Minimum Kerbweight: 1584
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 11.6

V. SPECIAL (new2) 08/01/2016

Ford has brought us an upscale version of its Mondeo, wearing the Vignale badge. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Review

The upmarket Vignale offers a very different spin on the Ford Mondeo ownership experience. A more personal service and some mouthwatering trim and equipment choices make this a bit of a treat.

Background

It's time to sit down, settle back and hit the 'way back when' button. We'll rewind back to a time when the Carrozzeria Ghia SpA was one of the real heavy hitters of the Italian styling business. That was back in the Fifties, with the company working with VW on the Karmann Ghia and Volvo on the lovely P1800. By the mid-Sixties, Ghia was in trouble and was at one point owned by De Tomaso, eventually ending up being snapped up by Ford. Seeing some value in the name, Ford decided to make the Ghia name its top trim level. Soon we started to see all sorts of sorry Orions and Escorts bearing this once proud name. Giacinto Ghia must have been rolling in his grave. Well, Ford's at it again. For Ghia, swap in Vignale. This is another Italian coachbuilder who fell on hard times, the company once owned by De Tomaso. Ford bought the name in 2013 and will hopefully treat it with more respect than it gave to Ghia. The first vehicle that gets the Vignale treatment certainly looks the goods. The Vignale Mondeo offers a buyer experience you probably never reckoned on from Ford.

Driving Experience

This top Ford is sold with the more powerful engines from the Blue Oval brand's stable, which means you get to choose between 2.0-litre EcoBoost petrol and TDCi diesel units, as well as the 187PS petrol-electric hybrid powertrain. Go for the 2.0-litre EcoBoost 240PS variant and you get a six-speed automatic transmission. The 180PS 2.0-litre TDCi diesel is offered with six-speed manual and PowerShift automatic transmissions, plus it also gets Ford's intelligent all-wheel drive system. Additionally offered is Ford's latest 210PS Bi-turbo 2.0-litre TDCi engine, this delivering a crushing 450Nm of torque available from 2000rpm. There's been a huge effort devoted to increasing refinement in the Vignale models. Ford's innovative Active Noise Cancellation system enhances interior refinement. Using three cabin microphones, the system is able to monitor engine noise in the interior. Advanced audio technology directs opposing sound waves through the audio system to cancel out engine noise and improve cabin ambience. Acoustic glass helps reduce wind noise to levels normally experienced only in the premium segment. Ford's integral link rear suspension claims to offer a smoother ride, in particular for rear seat passengers. The engineers also reckon that this set-up reduces noise levels by allowing the wheels to move further rearwards on impact with uneven road surfaces.

Design and Build

Although the silhouette is recognisably Mondeo, the Vignale's design details are worth a closer look. The upper grille features a hexagonal design in dark matt metallic finish and finished with a polished aluminium surround. There's also a high-gloss lower grille with chrome bars, chrome door details, a high-gloss finish for the windshield pillar and for the central and rear window pillars. Special 18-inch Vignale alloy wheels and an exclusive Vignale Nocciola paint finish are also offered. On to colour. Metallic paint comes as standard, with further options including Vignale Black, Vignale Silver and premium four-coat Vignale White. The interior looks a cut above, with seats are offered in exclusive Vignale leather trim. Laser-cut for high precision, the material features hexagonal quilting and tuxedo stitching with soft-touch elements that extend to the instrument panel, centre console, arm-rest, and door top-rolls. For front seat passengers, comfort can be optimised by Ford Multi-Contour Seats with Active Motion massage function. Designed to reduce muscle fatigue, particularly during longer journeys, the seats use a system of 11 inflatable cushions to deliver an unobtrusive massaging effect for thighs and lower back.

Market and Model

The Mondeo Vignale is offered in both four-door and estate body styles with prices starting at around £29,500. Bear in mind that this is within £3,000 of an entry-level Jaguar XF and you'll appreciate the scale of Ford's task here. Mind you, the ownership experience is quite special. Each Ford Vignale model is hand-finished by six master craftspeople at the new state-of-the-art Vignale Centre in Valencia, where vehicles are individually tailored to customer specification. Exclusively available to order in the UK from boutique FordStore locations, customers get access to a Vignale Lounge, where they can specify their vehicles, supported by a dedicated relationship manager to ensure a personalised service tailored to individual needs. Among bespoke services available to customers will be collection and delivery for vehicle servicing - from a home address or office location - alongside servicing scheduled to suit the owner. Buyers will also be able to call upon knowledgeable Vignale OneCall advisors 24 hours a day for additional support.

Cost of Ownership

Most British buyers are going to be drawn to the 180PS 2.0-litre diesel powerplant, and rightly so - it's a great engine. It returns 64.2mpg on the combined fuel economy cycle, with emissions of 115g/km. Step up to the 240PS petrol engine and you're looking at around 38mpg and 171g/km. The hybrid version is good for 67mpg and 99g/km. A bigger concern might well be depreciation. These are the most expensive 'mainstream' models Ford sells and it's up for debate whether many will see value in a £30,000+ Mondeo. Still, over 70% of all Mondeo buyers order their cars in upscale Titanium or Titanium X trims, so we're prepared to be proven wrong. If the Vignale can account for 10% of all Mondeo sales, the project will be deemed a success.

Summary

Okay, so Ford pretty much killed the Ghia badge, but it's doubtful the same's going to happen to the Vignale label. For a start, this is more than just a Titanium X-spec Mondeo with a few more bits. It's a different ownership experience; a more immersive and special process. It's not just a bit of showroom flim-flam to fleece Mondeo man who fantasises about getting the red carpet treatment at Ferrari either. The Vignale deal is something very different at this price point, but it offers a lot of car for your money too. Ford value hasn't changed. Perhaps this is what Ford needed to do to really shine a spotlight on the talents of the latest Mondeo. It's a bold venture and if it pays off, expect to see the Vignale badge on other Ford models.

NEW WORLD ORDER (new2) 10/10/2014

Ford's current Mondeo looks to revive the flagging medium-range family hatch sector. Does it have what it takes to break the spell of the premium marques? Jonathan Crouch reports on the improved range.

Ten Second Review

The Ford Mondeo pulls out all the stops in a bid to convince British buyers that the medium-range family hatch isn't a thing of the past. With excellent economy from a range of downsized engines, the sort of cabin tech you thought was the preserve of the premium German marques and a box-fresh chassis with an all-wheel drive option, there looks to be life in the Mondeo yet.

Background

A lesser manufacturer than Ford might well have given up. After all, sales of mainstream medium range family saloons and hatches have collapsed in recent years, falling to around a third what they once were as recently as ten years ago. The Mondeo had the unfortunate distinction of being a car that got markedly better with every consecutive generation but which was rewarded with progressively worse sales. Can this latest model turn things around? It has market conditions on its side. The economy has improved and the love affair with premium badges couldn't last forever. As the used market became flooded with BMWs and Audis, resale values crumbled. If Ford could step in with a genuinely convincing reason to buy something bigger and more luxurious, buyers might return to the fold. To that end, the Blue Oval has pulled out all the stops with the fifth generation model.

Driving Experience

Ford's gone big on engine choices. It had to really or risk falling behind the curve. The headline powerplant is the 210PS twin sequential turbocharged 2.0-litre diesel, but that's backed up by a more affordable revised 2.0-litre TDCi diesel engine with single variable geometry turbocharger technology good for either 150PS or 180PS. All three 2.0-litre TDCi variants feature a revised engine block, cylinder-head and fuel injection designs and Ford's lean NOX trap exhaust after-treatment system for even cleaner emissions. It doesn't stop there. Not even close. There is a 1.0-litre petrol engine. Yes, really. This one develops 125PS and is much the same as that found in the Fiesta, although specialised engine calibration takes into account the greater weight of the Mondeo. There is also a 160PS 1.5-litre EcoBoost unit, while a 2.0-litre EcoBoost powerplant has been developed in 240PS form. Buyers can even opt for a Mondeo Hybrid. It uses a specially-developed 2.0-litre petrol engine combined with two electric motors - one to drive the wheels and another to supply regenerative charging - and 1.4kWh lithium-ion battery. The 150PS and 180PS diesels are available with Ford's Intelligent All-Wheel Drive system, which offers a seamless transition between front-wheel drive and all-wheel-drive performance to automatically enhance traction and road-holding when needed. The Mondeo's also the first model for Europe to be built on Ford's global CD-segment platform, which debuts Ford's integral link rear suspension. The all-new platform and body structure combination delivers 10 per cent more torsional stiffness than the outgoing model and the Mondeo also gets electrically-assisted power steering for the first time with variable weighting. More importantly, road noise reductions of around three decibels in the rear and two decibels in the front have been achieved.

Design and Build

If there's one thing that's defined the Mondeo's design, it's that it's become bigger and more expensive-looking with each passing generation. This one doesn't divert from that precedent. The front gets Ford's Aston Martin lookalike grille with laser-cut headlamps and a power dome bonnet, while the fuselage is far more sculptured and sophisticated in its design than its immediate predecessor. Ford calls the roofline 'a sports coupe profile' which might be pushing it a bit, but it's a handsome thing. The estate version incorporates a retractable panoramic glass roof for the wagon bodystyle. Inside, Mondeo drivers are met with a digital analogue instrument cluster, while a wrap-around centre console design delivers a cockpit-like feel. Materials quality has stepped up a notch again, with a soft-touch instrument panel and flock-lined central front storage area and glovebox. Smart-design front seats feature a thinner seat back - enabling rear seat passengers to enjoy additional legroom without sacrificing space for driver and front passenger.

Market and Model

Trim levels now start with 'Zetec Edition', then buyers have the choice of something sportier ('ST-Line' or 'ST-Line Edtion') or plusher ('Titanium Edition'). For something truly luxurious, you'll need the flagship 'Vignale' variant. As standard, all models have navigation, a DAB tuner, front and rear parking sensors and cruise control with a speed limiter. 'ST-Line' series variants introduce extras including a body styling kit, lowered sports suspension, a Ford Power start button and a darkened headliner. Privacy glass and 19-inch 'rock metallic' alloy wheels are added on the 'ST-Line Edition' variants. Safety technology is a strongpoint. All derivatves get 'Active City Stop' autonomous braking to mitigate or avoid low-speed collisions at under 31mph. Plus there's Pedestrian Detection, which identifies people and reduces the severity of collisions at speeds of up to 50mph. A radar system also drives the Distance Indication feature and Adaptive Cruise Control technology. Cameras support a Lane Keeping Aid and Traffic Sign Recognition, which provides the driver with the speed limit, cancellation signs and overtaking regulations flashed up on the instrument cluster display. There are also full adaptive LED headlights on offer, as well as Active Park Assist featuring Perpendicular Parking.

Cost of Ownership

The Mondeo can't succeed in its particular sector with off-pace economy and emissions. Despite fleet sales falling as a proportion of total Mondeo registrations, Ford cannot afford to overlook this target market segment, especially if it wants to resurrect its company car client base. Fleet managers will like the look of what they're seeing here though. The diesels have followed the downsizing trend of the petrol engines, delivering better fuel efficiency and emissions at the same time as power has increased thanks to advanced technology. The 1.0-litre petrol engine shows how it's done, recording emissions of just 119g/km. The 1.5-litre EcoBoost unit packs 160PS but still emits just 134g/km. Even that's overshadowed by the ECOnetic Technology 1.6-litre diesel engine that looks set to hit its target figure of 94g/km. The hybrid model also dips under the critical 100g/km barrier, registering a saintly 99g/km, which is some going for such a sizeable vehicle.

Summary

Building one car for a number of markets was the original idea behind the Ford Mondeo and while this has clear cost-saving advantages for its maker, its also tended to mean that the Mondeo lagged behind many of the cars in its class when it came to technology. The development cycles on the car were just too long for it to be cutting edge. That's something that Ford is increasingly aware of and the latest version of this model has been engineered with a certain amount of future-proofing in mind. That said, it's been fully fifteen years since Honda launched the Insight in the UK, and Ford has only just got on board with the hybrid concept. That's some way behind the eight ball and the Blue Oval needs to rely on other clever engine and cabin tech to sell the Mondeo. Perhaps it's time that UK customers rediscovered the charms of this most honest of family vehicles. Ford's betting the house on it.

HAVE A HUG FROM YOUR MONDEO (family) 22/09/2017

June Neary discovers just how comfortable a car can be, as she tries out the much improved fourth generation Ford Mondeo

Will It Suit Me?

I've always thought the Mondeo rather staid. I need a practical car, but I like something with a bit of class. I've tended to prefer a hatchback model, too. With this MK4 version, I wondered whether such pre-conceptions much be in for a change after a spell behind the wheel of the Mondeo in popular 2.0 TDCi 150 form. Even before I turned on the engine I felt cosseted. The adjustable lumbar supports on the front seats are, in my view, a masterpiece of design. They hug you in - and if you've been sitting at a PC all day, as I often do, you'll soon feel the tension in your back ease away. Yes, it would suit me very well indeed - and not just because it's comfortable to sit in.

Practicalities

Despite my ill-founded prejudice against the range, I have to admit that this modernday Mondeo, even in standard form, offers a good all-round family package. Classy too. Put this fourth generation design one up alongside its predecessor and this looks a much costlier, more sophisticated thing, with its more prominent Aston Martin-style trapezoidal front grille and sweeping power dome bonnet. It's a handsome thing It's roomy inside too, with a sensible boot. It's also easy to get childseats in and out of the back seat too thanks to the wide rear doors. When I first took a seat in the car, I immediately noticed the high quality surfaces, materials and finishes. As with the outside, dynamic lines and styling curves are again evident, plus the low profile instrument panel provides very generous cabin space for front seat occupants. The dashboard is clear and the major controls for the electronics systems largely intuitive. The dashboard is laid out well enough and looks good. Flicking the switches and checking the quality of fit and finish, I was surprised to find how close the cabin now is to that you'd find in a BMW or an Audi. And it has all of the same gadgets, niceties and safety standards. Not that the MK4 Mondeo looks big from the outside or feels it behind the wheel. Despite the spacious interior, this model shrinks around you, much like an Audi A4 or a BMW 3 Series. I particularly liked the feature that dominates the centre of the dash, the 8-inch SYNC3 colour touchscreen, which plays its part in reducing button clutter and giving the cabin a cleaner, smarter feel. This set-up's divided into four colour-coded sectors that allow you to control audio, sat nav, 'phone and climate control functions via touchscreen buttons. Heating and ventilation is also covered off by switchgear below the screen, which is just as well since the display buttons can be a little slow and fiddly to use. Instead of stabbing away at these, it's better to try and master the system's impressive voice-activated functionality that allows you to issue simple 'one shot' commands, like 'play song' to play a track from a CD, 'where am I?' to find out where you are or even 'I'm hungry' to bring up a list of local restaurants from the system's built-in Michelin Guide. Directions can then be activated from the split-screen navigation display. Rear seat headroom and legroom have also come in for scrutiny by the Mondeo development team and these have been maximized for occupant comfort and safety. Our Road Test Editor is 6'4" and he was easily able to fit comfortably in the back seat behind a front seat virtually all the way back on its runner.

Behind the Wheel

Even though the version I tried was a 150PS 2.0-litre TDCi rather than the top flight 180PS version, it seemed well up to the job. The car itself will, I believe, appeal to a lot of women who like a challenging drive as well as a something looks good. Use the traction control, though. I'd no idea what it would do, but it stopped the car scrubbing all its power away in disconcertingly wheelspin when trying to get out of T-junctions in the rain. On to safety. You get ABS with Electronic Brakeforce Distribution, a collapsible pedal structure that stops you injuring your legs in a front-end impact, anti-whiplash head restraints, and ISOFix child seat points in every model. The twin front airbags analyse the severity of a crash and deploy accordingly and can detect if there's a passenger in the front seat (in which case, that airbag won't go off). Side airbags are also standard of course as are side curtain airbags, which offer protection from side impacts along the whole length of the passenger compartment.

Value For Money

List pricing suggests that you'll be paying between £21,000 and £30,000 for your Mondeo, depending on the model you opt for and the specification you need. There's a £1,200 premium if you want the estate version, rather than the 5-door hatch. The only way you can opt for the saloon bodystyle these days is to choose the rare petrol/electric Hybrid version, which requires a £25,000 budget. The mainstream line-up is inevitably geared towards diesel power, though it's well worth doing your sums before opting for the black pump, as Ford's EcoBoost petrol engine technology is surprisingly efficient. Indeed, the brand's 125PS 1.0T and 160PS 1.5T EcoBoost petrol powerplants actually make quite good alternatives to the entry-level 1.5 TDCi 120PS diesel engine. This base 1.5-litre diesel variant is the one most buyers will probably choose.

Could I Live With One?

If I were choosing from the usual company car options list, I'd find it hard to look beyond the MK4 Mondeo. It does everything I need a car to do, and a lot more besides. Then there's that welcoming hug every time you climb in.