Renault Megane 1.6 dCi Dynamique Nav 5dr with Low Mileage, Sat Nav & Parking Sensors Diesel Hatchback (2017) at Renault Bury

01617 178 923

£13,000

WAS £18,000, SAVE £5,000

Finished in Cosmos Blue Metallic Paint and fitted with Spare Wheel, Audio system with touch screen, radio receives AM/FM, digital and RDS colour screen, Four speakers, Satellite navigation system with colour, 8.7 inch display, touch screen, 3D and voice and traffic information, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Automatic air conditioning with two climate control zones, Central door locking, parking distance sensors, Halogen low beam halogen high beam headlights with complex surface lenses.

28/09/2017

11550

Manual

Diesel 70.6 combined MPG

BLUE

New Lower Price



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Michael Griffiths

Michael Griffiths
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Manager's Comment

open quoteOur Renault Megane comes fitted with Satellite Navigation System, Bluetooth, Parking sensors, Connection for USB and audio devices, Alloy wheels and plenty more.close quote

CO2: 104 g/km

MPG: 70.6

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MOT Certificate

MOT Certificate

Manuals

Manuals

Finished in Cosmos Blue Metallic Paint and fitted with Spare Wheel, Audio system with touch screen, radio receives AM/FM, digital and RDS colour screen, Four speakers, Satellite navigation system with colour, 8.7 inch display, touch screen, 3D and voice and traffic information, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Automatic air conditioning with two climate control zones, Central door locking, parking distance sensors, Halogen low beam halogen high beam headlights with complex surface lenses.

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.6
Badge Power: 130
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: dCi
Coin Series: Dynamique Nav
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 19E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: N
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: N
NCAP Safety Assist %: N
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 18000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 100000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 4
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions

CO2 (g/km): 104
HC: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: SOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1598
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 80
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 79.5
Engine Code: R9M 409
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: COMMON RAIL
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption

EC Combined (mpg): 70.6
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 78.5
EC Urban (mpg): 60.1

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 10
Engine Power - BHP: 130
Engine Power - KW: 96
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 4000
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 236
Engine Torque - MKG: 32.6
Engine Torque - NM: 320
Engine Torque - RPM: 1750
Top Speed: 123

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 205/55 R16
Tyre Size Rear: 205/55 R16
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: DAKOTA
Wheel Type: 16" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1447
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 4359
Wheelbase: 2669
Width: 1814
Width (including mirrors): 2058

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 47
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1890
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1247
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 434
Max. Loading Weight: 461
Max. Roof Load: 80
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 1600
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 695
Minimum Kerbweight: 1429
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 11.2

RENAULT'S FRENCH FANCY (new2) 29/04/2016

The Renault Megane has been competing against cars such as the Vauxhall Astra and other similar sized hatchbacks since 1995. Now in its fourth generation, it faces stiff competition from hatchbacks and crossovers alike. Jonathan Crouch drives one.

Ten Second Review

Renault's fourth generation Megane family hatchback is now a smarter proposition - in more ways than one. If you're shopping for something Focus or Astra-shaped in this segment, it'll probably no longer be one of the first cars you'll immediately think of, but this MK4 model is clever, sensible and very good looking, with the bold exterior styling matched by the cleverness of the fresh platform that lies beneath. In short, it might surprise you.

Background

Ordinary family cars can no longer be ordinary. People want polish these days, a smarter feel and hi-tech features that make them feel pampered and premium. Which means that in the Focus-sized family hatchback segment, they may well find themselves looking at cars like this one, Renault's latest fourth generation Megane. This more sophisticated design these days has a more mature look to match seriously grown up technologies under the skin. Luxury car touches such as a massaging drivers' seat and full colour head up display merge with sub-100g/km CO2 emissions to make for a very interesting package. With the French maker's position as one of Europe's biggest car makers severely under threat and a slimmed-down range of conventional models forced upon dealers by this brand's commitment to electric power, it's hard to over-state the importance of this car if you happen to run a showroom with the yellow-backed silver diamond above the door.

Driving Experience

As with the vast majority of cars such as this, a big part of the driving experience will depend on the engine you've plumped for. The mainstream Megane range is based around just two engines, a 1.2-litre Tce 130 petrol unit and a 1.5-litre dCi 110 diesel. Both come with the option of dual clutch EDC auto transmission. At the top of the range, the flaship Megane R.S. hot hatch uses a 280hp 1.8-litre petrol turbo unit. On the road, all versions of this Megane are precise and responsive while still being supple and comfortable thanks to extensive work on the suspension dampers, bump stops and bushes as well as the steering. Refinement is also significantly better than wth previous models, thanks to a stiffer body shell, thicker window glass, improved door seals and greater use of foam and felt in areas where road, wind or powertrain noise could be transmitted into the cabin. A more individual driving experience is offered by Multi-Sense technology, which allows drivers to personalise the accelerator pedal and engine response, engine sound, steering weight and interior lighting ambience through a choice of five colours, plus - where fitted - the speed of the gear changes through the Efficient Dual Clutch (EDC) auto gearbox.

Design and Build

The fourth generation Megane is longer, lower and wider than its predecessor to give a more assured stance on the road. Helping give the impression of width are pronounced wheelarches similar to those on a Clio and striking light graphics front and rear. These scribe a 'C' shape up front, with the rear lights barely separated by the centrally mounted Renault badge. This echoes the large diamond logo up front with a typically large grille surrounding it. Step inside and you'll find a step up in quality compared to the previous generation car, with a distinctly Germanic feel to the ambiance. Higher end versions get a smattering of chrome trim, along with Nappa leather trimmings to help lift things further. While a 7" touchscreen infotainment system in the traditional landscape format is fitted to most models, plusher trims receive something a little different. Aping the Tesla Model S, Renault offer an 8.7" touchscreen in a portrait orientation. Boot capacity is an impressive 434-litres, significantly more than the class average. If you want more, there's a more versatile Sport Tourer estate bodystyle available with a 580-litre boot capacity and the longest loading length in the class.

Market and Model

Megane buyers get the choice of a five-door hatch or the Sport Tourer estate bodystyle. Prices in the mainstream line-up range in the £17,500 to £24,000 bracket and trim levels tun from 'Play' to 'Iconic' to 'GT-Line'. There's also the top hot hatch Megane Renaultsport variant with its 280hp 1.8-litre engine, priced from around £27,500. Across all these levels, to compete in the Focus family hatch segment, this car will need to be very well equipped - and is. All models get Bluetooth connectivity, an automatic electronic parking brake, LED daytime running lamps, tinted windows, a 7-inch TFT instrument panel with digital speedometer, all-round electric windows, a leather steering wheel and a DAB radio with fingertip controls and an AUX input. Higher specification models benefit from such niceties as full LED lights front and rear, TFT instrument display, a driver's seat with massage function and a nine speaker BOSE stereo with an amp and subwoofer. Safety is covered by a range of available technologies on top of the usual electronic aids. These include autonomous braking for emergency scenarios, adaptive cruise control that can increase and decrease the speed of the car in traffic plus warnings for speed limits, braking distances and lane departure. Those that struggle to park will appreciate the front, rear and side parking sensors and the hands-free parking ability of higher end models.

Cost of Ownership

Economy and emissions figures look promising. The 1.2 Tce 130 petrol version manages 52.3mpg and 120g/km. The 1.5 dCi 110PS diesel variant is capable of 76.4mpg while emitting 96g/km of CO2. Another aspect of purchase that should please you lies in the fact that you won't be fobbed off with the basic three year / 60,000 mile warranty that most rivals offer. All Meganes come with a much more complete four-year / 100,000-mile warranty that includes emergency breakdown recovery. There's also three years' worth of European cover as part of this package. But will swinging depreciation negate all that hard work when it comes to totting up overall ownership costings? The previous generation Megane certainly didn't perform very well in this regard but Renault says that with this car, things are different. Recognising the impact of those low maintenance costings, independent experts are apparently predicting a rise of around 8% in residual values across the range. That should see petrol-powered Megane models hanging on to around 29% of their new value after three years and 60,000 miles, which is much the same as a Ford Focus or a Kia Cee'd and really not that far off a much pricier Volkswagen Golf. Diesel versions fare better, with the volume dCi 110 model set to retain 32% of its original cost over the same period.

Summary

Renault had to step up its game and significantly improve its fourth generation Megane. It has. Coming up with something different, yet still appealing in the super-competitive Focus-class family hatch segment is never easy but in some respects, Renault has really managed that with this car. The 'Multi-Sense' vehicle dynamics system and the 'R-Link 2' infotainment set-up for example, offer things you genuinely can't get in any other rival. Ultimately, what matters here is whether buyers in this segment who might in recent years have dismissed this Megane out of hand will take another look at its now much improved proposition. We think they'd do well to consider it. True, this may not be the European market leader it was a decade or so ago but it's a compact family five-door that now ticks an awful lot of boxes. And one that an awful lot of people we think, would rather enjoy owning..

FRENCH SENSE (used) 13/11/2015

By Jonathan Crouch

Introduction

By 2014, Renault's third generation Megane was getting a little old, having been on sale since 2008. However, it still had two years to live, so the French brand gave the car one last update to last it through the final couple of years of its life in MK3 model guise. In this final form, this Gallic family hatchback was a smarter proposition - in more ways than one. If you're shopping for something Focus or Astra-shaped in the used car family hatchback segment, it probably won't be one of the first cars you'll immediately think of but it still offers a very complete all-round package that's difficult to ignore.

Models

5dr hatchback/estate (1.2, 1.6 petrol, 1.5, 1.6 diesel [Expression+, Knight Edition, Dynamique Tom Tom, GT Line])

History

When the final version of the third generation Renault Megane reached the company's dealer showrooms early in 2014, it was in a period of turmoil for the French maker. The brand had gambled on a range of full-electric models and that outlay was taking a long while to pay off. Worse, the expenditure had forced the Gallic brand to compromise its development budget a little, hence the fact that the third generation Megane, first introduced in 2008, had still to represent the company in Europe's most important family hatchback buying segment. This model had already been heavily revised once, in 2012 when it got fresh engine choices and a range of styling tweaks. In this later version, the looks were further tweaked and specifications enhanced. The changes lasted the MK3 model through to the end of its life at the end of 2015.

What You Get

The styling of the original 2008 version of this MK3 Megane wasn't especially memorable, but it was essentially quite smart, with a strong dynamic stance thanks to particularly short front and rear overhangs. So not too much of a nip and tuck was needed back in 2014 to bring it up to date. Here, we're looking mainly at the five-door hatchback and Sport Tourer estate models. By this time, the saloon model had been dropped from the range. The coupe and coupe-cabriolet variants we'll cover in separate reports. In terms of the hatch version most will be looking at, well we always quite liked the front end, with its racy crease lines sweeping down from the A-pillars across the sculpted bonnet and the neat way the wipers are concealed beneath the bonnet line. The changes made in 2014 gave this front section a more contemporary look, with a prominent bold Renault logo set against a gloss background and flanked by restyled streamlined elliptical headlamps and LED daytime running lights that stretch along the outer edges of the revised bumper, extending the fluid contours of the air intakes and adding to the purposeful look. Move along the side past the restyled alloy wheels and you might struggle to see the 'Latin influence' Renault reckoned was at work here but there's a strong coupe-like look and a feature line that at the rear is picked up by the two-piece light clusters. You're more likely though, to remember the cabin of this car, if only because of the rather odd digital speedometer/analogue rev counter instrument arrangement most models offered - though not the up-market sporty variants, which got a more conventional set of dials. There's no issue with the quality of fixtures and fittings that were decently screwed together by the Spanish Palencia factory: the soft-touch finish on the dashboard cowling for example that's resistant to daily use and the ageing effects of sunlight. And the well-chosen selection of trim and materials that's especially nice on plusher variants. The important thing to note is that you don't have to pay for an expensive version for your Megane to feel smartly turned out. And that's a major advantage this Renault has over competitors from Volkswagen and Ford. It's certainly very comfortable at the wheel, thanks to reach and rake adjustment for the steering wheel and a wider range of seat height adjustment than any other car in the class from this era can offer. Rear three-quarter visibility could be better though. Because this car was designed primarily for lefthand drive markets, the fusebox takes up half the glovebox space but otherwise, there's plenty of practicality around the cabin, with under-floor stowage compartments and door bins designed to carry a one-litre bottle. Dominating the upper middle part of the dash is the display screen for the Carminat Tom Tom sat nav system most new car owners wanted. With this revised model, they also had the option of building into it the brand's clever R-Link infotainment system with an upgraded 7-inch display that offered more sophisticated route guidance as well as an Eco Driving menu and various downloadable apps. We like the way this screen is so versatile, showing anything from uploadable family pictures to weather reports. And there are features like voice recognition, email access and text-to-speech functionality. Thanks to a long 2.64m wheelbase, interior space was always a selling point of this design, something you especially appreciate from a seat in the rear. Renault reckoned that three fully sized adults would be perfectly comfortable here - though we'd doubt that if the journey were to be very long. Still, no car in this class can properly accommodate three burly people at the back: should that be required, they'll be better off in this Megane than they would be in many other models in this segment. And three kids will be quite comfortable. Luggage is well-served too. Though it has quite a high lip, the 372-litre boot is one of the largest and best shaped in the class from this era, offering 56-litres more than you'd get in a comparable Focus and 21-litres more than you'd get in an Astra. If you get a car on which the original buyer didn't specify the preferable extra-cost spare wheel, there's 33-litres of under-floor storage too. Even with the spare fitted though, the cargo area is certainly able to swallow a couple of family suitcases and two overnight bags with ease - though folding the rear seats down to increase cargo capacity could be a simpler process. The reason for that though is that the seat folding process is a bit better thought out than with most cars in this segment. Normally, all that happens on a car like this is that you flop the rear seatback onto the base - but that doesn't leave you with a flat cargo bay. Here, you can pull up the seat base too and push it forward, so that the seatback can lie level. It makes a big difference - especially when you're trying to get in something big, square and heavy like a fridge or a chest of drawers. It also means that though the capacity revealed is one of the smaller totals in this class - 1,129-litres - you'd still be able to see this car as one of the more practical choices in its sector. If that's not enough, the Sports Tourer estate version offers 524-litres of space beneath the rear parcel shelf and the option of folding the back seats down to free up 1,600-litres.

What You Pay

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What to Look For

The Megane's powerplants have a good reliability record but customer satisfaction surveys show the Renault still has some way to go to approach the class best when it comes to reliability of electronics and servicing costs. The cabins look great when new but after surveying a few used examples, some of the dash materials can look a little scratched quite easily. As a result, it'll help if you make sure the car you're looking at is in perfect condition. Check for crash damage, make sure kids haven't damaged the rear upholstery or seat backs and ensure that sunroofs, central locking and alarms all work.

Replacement Parts

(based on a 2014 Megane 1.2 TCe - ex Vat) You'll need to budget around are around £130 per corner for tyres, while a clutch assembly is £230. Front brake pads are £45 a set with the rears costing £35.

On the Road

There's nothing especially sophisticated about this car under the skin, so it probably won't come as too much of a surprise if we tell you that there's nothing especially remarkable about the driving experience it offers. It lacks the clever multi-link rear suspension set-up that you get on a Focus - but then so do rivals like Vauxhall's Astra and Peugeot's 308. Lower-order Volkswagen Golfs and SEAT Leons are no cleverer when it comes to damping either. What's important here is that Renault's engineers made the most of what they had and, as anyone who's driven a Megane Renaultsport model will tell you, it's amazing what they can draw from what on paper seems like an unpromising set of mechanical ingredients. Detailed tweaks made to this MK3 model Megane in its later years included a revised front suspension/subframe arrangement to improve directional precision and a rear suspension set-up tuned to produce a more responsive, agile ride, as well as offer improved cornering. Sportier-trimmed variants, like the GT Line version, claimed to take that a little further by using the same slightly stiffer set-up used in the three-door Megane Coupe. But none of it gives this car the Renaultsport feeling. Nor should it. Most buyers in this segment don't want to drive on their door handles. Talk to the engineers and you discover that many of the later MK3 model Megane dynamic improvements were qualified by the need to preserve the ride comfort, refinement and ease of use that existing owners so appreciated. Perhaps that's why the supposedly more responsive electric power steering system of this revised model still lacked feel. At least that makes this Renault easy to use around town. The main development focus with this car centred around making it very easy to drive. Everything - steering, pedals, gearchange - is all very light, something you'll either like or you won't. The same comment also applies to the rather incongruous-looking but very clear instrument arrangement with its digital speedometer and analogue rev counter. If you plan to take on the likes of the Ford Focus, Vauxhall Astra, Volkswagen Golf and Peugeot 308, you need to come equipped with a lot of engine choices and this post-2014 model Megane was better provided for in that department. The petrol unit of choice, the 1.2-litre TCe, was available in two guises, the existing 115bhp manual model joined by a pokier 130bhp variant that was only offered with the brand's twin clutch EDC automatic gearbox. The 1.2 TCe was the first Renault petrol powerplant to use direct fuel injection and turbocharging to gain fuel-efficient performance. This was yet another example of engine down-sizing in this segment, following the success of Ford's 1.0-litre Focus EcoBoost models. As in that case, the objective here was to provide the performance of a 2.0-litre petrol unit allied the fuel economy of a diesel, but because Renault stuck with a four cylinder layout rather than switching to three cylinders, you don't get the buzzy thrum under power you'd find in the Ford. You don't get quite the same fuel and CO2 returns either but this particular variant can still manage a vast improvement over the aging 1.6-litre 16v petrol engine that continued to prop up the Megane petrol range. And offer a driving experience that's much nicer. Thanks to a 40Nm torque hike over the 1.6, the pulling power's greater - and more accessible, with 90% of the 190Nm on offer in the 115bhp model available from just 1,600rpm, so you don't have to row the thing along with the gear lever. Sixty two mph is 10.9s away from rest en route to 118mph. Go for the automatic 1.2 TCe 130 EDC variant and those figures improve to 9.7s and 124mph. Ultimately though, for diesel-like pulling power, you really need a diesel and the vast majority of MK3 model Megane customers tended to opt for this car in 1.5-litre form. The 1.5-litre dCi 110 unit was Renault's best-selling global engine in this period and post-2014 model Megane customers who selected it could choose between two versions: a manual model with Stop & Start or an automatic EDC variant. Either way, a 20% increase in pulling power meant that there was at least 260Nm of torque on offer, enough to get you to 62mph in around 12s on the way to 118mph. Should that not be sufficient in your five-door Megane Hatch or Sport Tourer estate, then one other key diesel choice remains - the impressive 1.6 dCi 130 unit. This was one of the best diesels of the period and was a good choice for towers, with a useful 320Nm of torque meaning a sub-10s rest to sixty time on the way to 124mph.

Overall

Renault's third generation Megane is good value on the used car market - which could well mean that your budget might well stretch to one of the last post-2014 model variants we've been looking at here. If so, you'll get yourself a well equipped comfort-orientated family hatch that offers a lot of car for the money. It really is a very credible alternative to the usual Astra and Focus-class choices in the family hatchback segment. In the lower reaches of the range, driving comfort takes priority over driving dynamics, but that's probably as it should be. Further up the line-up though, you can really feel a touch of Renaultsport magic in the way this car attacks a twisting road. Overall, this car is roomy, quiet, safe and pleasantly plush, even in entry-level form. In other words, a compact family five-door that ticks an awful lot of boxes. And one an awful lot of people we think, would rather enjoy owning..

FAMILY HATCH FRANCAIS (family) 25/05/2018

The family hatchback sector is bursting with talent. Can the latest Renault Megane come out on top? June Neary reports

Will It Suit Me?

When I think of a Renault Megane - if I ever do at all - then it tends to be the second generation version with its trendy vertical rear end. Its styling was a bit of an acquired taste but at least people talked about it. That was less true of the car's MK3 successor, but this current MK4 model once more has a bit of style about it, the point of which is to give this car a bit of its own personality again. This is a good idea because there's never been very much wrong with the Megane in my humble opinion. More recent versions have long since lost the airfix kit-like cabin fittings you found in original models and have instead added in wafer-thin panel gaps, classy materials and solid nuggety cuteness. It all should have long ago made this a car a real rival for Volkswagen's disappointingly conservative MK7 Golf, as well as for cars like Peugeot's 308, Ford's Focus, Toyota's Auris and Vauxhall's Astra. And Renault could still severely frighten these models if enough people can be persuaded to get behind the wheel of this much improved MK4 Megane.

Practicalities

My better half and I shared the driving on a recent round trip and got to know the five-door car pretty well. The driving position suited us both, the adjustable steering wheel a welcome feature, given our different shape and sizes! The seats are firm but supportive and over the distance pretty comfortable. Children will be happy as sandboys in the back seat - which, unlike in some cars we've driven recently, is deep enough to accommodate booster seats and the like. The boot was surprisingly spacious for a medium-sized family hatchback at 434-litres, although we weren't overloaded with bags on this occasion. I'm sure that we'd have no gripes about luggage space for our fortnight summer holiday all the same. I thought that Renault's unparalleled experience in the MPV market shone through with this car, not only in terms of passenger space - which is excellent - but also in the provision of multifarious cubbies, boxes and pockets. Higher end versions get a smattering of chrome cabin trim, along with Nappa leather trimmings to help lift things further. While a 7" touchscreen infotainment system in the traditional landscape format is fitted to most models, plusher trims receive something a little different. Aping the Tesla Model S, Renault offer an 8.7" touchscreen in a portrait orientation.

Behind the Wheel

The engine line-up is a mixture of familiar carry-overs and new arrivals. If you plan to take on the likes of the Ford Focus, Vauxhall Astra, Volkswagen Golf and Peugeot 308, you need to come equipped with a lot of engine choices and Renault doesn't fall shy in that department. There are two TCe turbocharged petrol options, with capacities and power outputs of 1.2 litres/130hp (manual and EDC auto) and 1.6 litres/205hp (GT). The turbodiesel alternatives are the usual 1.5-litre dCi 110hp and 1.6-litre dCi 130hp units. Refinement is significantly better in this MK4 model thanks to a stiffer body shell, thicker window glass, improved door seals and greater use of foam and felt in areas where road, wind or powertrain noise could be transmitted into the cabin. A more individual driving experience is offered by Multi-Sense technology, which allows drivers to personalise the accelerator pedal and engine response, engine sound, steering weight and interior lighting ambience through a choice of five colours, plus - where fitted - the speed of the gear changes through the Efficient Dual Clutch (EDC) auto gearbox. Even more crucial is the way that the design has retained its top safety credentials. Electronic aids include autonomous braking for emergency scenarios, adaptive cruise control that can increase and decrease the speed of the car in traffic plus warnings for speed limits, braking distances and lane departure. Those that struggle to park will appreciate the front, rear and side parking sensors and the hands-free parking ability of higher end models. In other words, should you manage to bend a new Megane, you'll have really excelled yourself.

Value For Money

Megane buyers get the choice of a five-door hatch or the Sport Tourer estate bodystyle. Prices range in the £16,500 to £25,500 bracket. That's about on par with most of its mainstream rivals but usefully undercuts vehicles like the Volkswagen Golf. Trim levels range from 'Expression+', through 'Dynamique Nav' and 'Dynamique S Nav' to 'Signature Nav', 'GT-Line Nav' and 'GT Nav'. Across all these levels, to compete in the Focus family hatch segment, this car will need to be very well equipped - and is. All models get Bluetooth connectivity, an automatic electronic parking brake, LED daytime running lamps, tinted windows, a 7-inch TFT instrument panel with digital speedometer, all-round electric windows, a leather steering wheel and a DAB radio with fingertip controls and an AUX input. Higher specification models benefit from such niceties as full LED lights front and rear, TFT instrument display, a driver's seat with massage function and a nine speaker BOSE stereo with an amp and subwoofer.

Could I Live With One?

On the whole, I found little to criticise with the latest Megane - and at last, it has a bit more French character, if not in quite as extreme a way as its MK2 model predecessor. Probably, that's a good thing. Add in frugal engines and high equipment levels and at the right price, here's a Focus-sized family hatch that's worthy of comparison to virtually any of its rivals.

Renault Megane average rating: 4/5 (2 reviews)

- 29/09/2016, owner of a Renault Megane Diesel Hatchback 1.5 dCi Dynamique Nav 5dr

User rating: 4.5/5

User comment:
I have had many Renaults over the years, the last two being Meganes. The one recently bought from Bury Motors is up to the usual high standard ie. Economical, stylish and very nice to drive.

- 06/08/2016 19:17, owner of a Renault Megane Diesel Hatchback 1.5 dCi Dynamique Nav 5dr - 2016

User rating: 4/5

User comment:
I love my Renault Megane Dynamique Tom Tom - it is a great looking car and a pleasure to drive. The 1.5dci engine is really powerful and I love everything about it - the only negative comment I would make is that the rear seats do feel rather cramped but as there is just me and my wife these won't be used that often otherwise I would find it quite an issue.