Renault Grand Scenic 1.5 dCi Dynamique Nav 5dr with Massive Savings from New List Diesel Estate (2017) at Renault Bury

01617 178 923

£17,000

WAS £19,500, SAVE £2,500

Finished in Oyster Grey Metallic paint and fitted with Emergency spare wheel, Luxe Pack, Boot Liner, Audio system with touch screen and radio receives AM/FM, digital and RDS colour screen, Six speakers, Satellite navigation system with colour, 7.0 inch display, touch screen, 3D and voice and traffic information, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Automatic air conditioning with two climate control zones, Central door locking, Electronic traction control, Brake assist system, parking distance sensors.

20/12/2017

9055

Manual

Diesel 70.6 combined MPG

GREY

New Lower Price



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Michael Griffiths

Michael Griffiths
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Manager's Comment

open quoteOur Renault Grand Scenic comes well equipped with plenty of extras such as Luxe Pack, Boot liner and other desirable features like Satellite Navigation, Bluetooth and parking distance sensors.close quote

CO2: 104 g/km

MPG: 70.6

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Manuals

Manuals

Finished in Oyster Grey Metallic paint and fitted with Emergency spare wheel, Luxe Pack, Boot Liner, Audio system with touch screen and radio receives AM/FM, digital and RDS colour screen, Six speakers, Satellite navigation system with colour, 7.0 inch display, touch screen, 3D and voice and traffic information, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Automatic air conditioning with two climate control zones, Central door locking, Electronic traction control, Brake assist system, parking distance sensors.

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.5
Badge Power: 110
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: dCi
Coin Series: Dynamique Nav
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 12E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: N
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: N
NCAP Safety Assist %: N
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 16000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 100000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 4
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions

CO2 (g/km): 104
HC: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: SOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1461
Compression Ratio: 15.2:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 76
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 80.5
Engine Code: K9K 646
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: COMMON RAIL
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 8
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption

EC Combined (mpg): 70.6
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 74.3
EC Urban (mpg): 64.2

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 12.4
Engine Power - BHP: 110
Engine Power - KW: 81
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 4000
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 192
Engine Torque - MKG: 26.5
Engine Torque - NM: 260
Engine Torque - RPM: 1750
Top Speed: 114

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 195/55 R20
Tyre Size Rear: 195/55 R20
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: SILVERTONE
Wheel Type: 20" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: N
Height (including roof rails): 1655
Length: 4634
Wheelbase: 2804
Width: 1866
Width (including mirrors): 2128

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 53
Gross Vehicle Weight: 2298
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 189
Max. Loading Weight: 766
Max. Roof Load: 80
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 750
Minimum Kerbweight: 1532
No. of Seats: 7
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 11.39

GRAND DESIGNS (new2) 11/11/2016

Renault's Grand Scenic looks awfully large to be powered by a 1.5-litre diesel. Jonathan Crouch investigates.

Ten Second Review

A seven-seat vehicle with 1.5-litre diesel power doesn't sound like a winning combination but Renault's 1.5-litre dCi engine occupies the Grand Scenic engine bay with some aplomb. Performance is nothing special but economy - which can be massaged by a clever Hybrid Assist system - hits improbably highs and there's enough torque to get the big people carrier moving at low speeds. Build quality and ride comfort in this third generation range are particular Grand Scenic strongpoints.

Background

Lots of power is a nice thing to have in a car but it isn't always absolutely necessary. Motorists who are willing to put up with acceleration that's on the sluggish side and pulling power of sub-epic proportions can save a lot on the upfront purchase price and in the running costs of their vehicle. The question is, how low is it sensible to go? Ordering the seven-seat, 1.5 tonne Renault Grand Scenic with a 1.5-litre dCi diesel engine looks like sailing a little too close to the wind but if all you're after is a roomy family runabout, the French marque's little diesel could pull it off. In this case, we're looking at the MK3 Grand Scenic model, altogether more sophisticated and stylish than its predecessor. Here, the design is far more stylish and driver-centric than before, plus there's more space and storage inside along with more sophisticated infotainment technology. A 'Hybrid Assist' version of this 1.5-litre diesel variant will tempt those in search of ultimate efficiency too. Sounds promising doesn't it?

Driving Experience

You can find the 1.5 dCi engine in a number of Renault's smaller products. None of them is as weighty a proposition as the Grand Scenic, however, or has the potential to gain weight with up to seven passengers and their luggage piled on board. Added to this, the engine's maximum power output is just 110bhp, making it the least powerful of the Grand Scenic's engines. On the plus side, there's torque of 260Nm available at 2,000rpm, which is enough to provide very eager pulling power. It gives the car enough muscle to cope at low speeds even with a large payload on board but the emphasis is on coping. Performance is fairly pedestrian, as a 0-62mph time of 12.4s demonstrates. This derivative is also being offered with clever 'Hybrid Assist' technology. Hybrid Assist functions with a 48-volt battery, enabling the electric motor to support the internal combustion engine, which remains in continuous operation. You automatically approach any seven-seat MPV measuring four and a half meters from nose to tail with certain expectations about how it will drive but it's worth giving the Grand Scenic the benefit of the doubt. Comfort is the priority and rightly so but Renault has also managed to instil a high degree of poise and manoeuvrability. With its suspension system lifted from the Megane, the Grand Scenic resists cornering roll well and has plenty of grip at the front wheels. The ride quality is first class, the car tiptoeing over poor road surfaces and avoiding too much wobbliness on sudden undulations. The steering is sometimes too light and the manual gearbox isn't the slickest but in general, and considering the Grand Scenic's family remit, Renault has got the balance just about right.

Design and Build

This is a bigger car than its second generation predecessor, 75mm longer, 15mm higher and 2mm wider. As significantly, there's 35mm more wheelbase. That's not enough to make this Grand Scenic a rival to really large MPVs like Volkswagen's Sharan, but it'll make it easier for this Renault to be considered as a really credible alternative to the largest compact MPV in the segment, Ford's S-MAX. It certainly looks sharper than before. The styling is based on Renault's R-Space concept car, key features like the steeply-raked windscreen and short bonnet heightening the elegance of this Grand Scenic's MPV silhouette. Uniquely, big 20-inch wheels are fitted to all versions. At the same time, the three-part screen combines a panoramic view with improved side vision. At the front, there's a more distinctive lighting signature. Depending on version, the C-shaped front headlights benefit from LED PURE VISION technology, while Edge Light technology provides the taillights with a 3D effect. The boot of this third generation model boasts a volume of 718-litres when the third seating row isn't in use; that compares to the 572-litre figure you get from the standard Scenic model. Plus around the car, there's total additional stowage capacity of 63-litres. Take the 'Easy Life drawer', which faces the front passenger seat and offers a storage area of 11.5-litres. That's three litres more than a conventional glove box. Lit and chilled, it opens via an electronic sensor and automatically locks when the vehicle stops. Plus, as before, there are four underfloor compartments.

Market and Model

There's the usual premium of around £1,800 to get this Grand Scenic seven-seat bodyshape over the ordinary five-seat Scenic model. Prices for this 1.5-litre dCi 110 diesel derivative start at just over £24,000 and there's the £1,500 option of EDC auto transmission if you want it. Entry-level 'Expression+' trim gives you most of what you'll need, but if you stretch up to mid-range 'Dynamique Nav' spec, there's the option of a 'Hybrid Assist' version of this 1.5-litre diesel engine at a premium of around £1,000. Further up the range, there are plusher 'Dynamique S Nav' and 'Signature Nav' variants if you want more kit. With these, you've you the same manual, EDC auto or Hybrid Assist powertrain oprions. A key new safety addition this time round is the AEBS 'Active Emergency Braking System' which also has a Pedestrian Protection feature. Lane Keeping Assist and a Fatigue Detection system are additionally being offered. Along with Adaptive Cruise Control, Lane Departure Warning, a Safe Distance Warning system, 'Traffic Sign Recognition with Over Speed Prevention' and Blind Spot Warning. Buyers can also specify a reversing camera, automatic dipped and main beam headlights, front, rear and side parking sensors and Easy Park Assist hands-free parking.

Cost of Ownership

The Grand Scenic may no longer have the lowest running costs in its class but they're still impressively low for a car of this size. The efficiency champion is the 1.5-litre dCi 110PS diesel model fitted with the brand's clever 'Hybrid Assist' system that works with a 48-volt battery and provides an electric motor to support the diesel engine. Here, you're looking at 80.7mpg on the combined cycle and 92g/km of CO2. Even if you can't stretch to that variant though, you should find this to be a very frugal MPV. In conventional form for example, the 110PS 1.5-litre dCi diesel model should return 70.6mpg on the combined cycle and 104g/km of CO2, figures exactly replicated by the EDC auto version. As you would expect, all Grand Scenic models are aided in achieving their figures by a Stop & Start system that cuts the engine when you don't need it, stuck n traffic or waiting at the lights. Most buyers will want to consider the 'Renault 4+' programme which provides retail customers with a comprehensive four year/100,000 mile warranty, free routine servicing for four years or 48,000 miles, includes four years of roadside assistance cover and offers up to four years of lease or PCP finance, subject to status.

Summary

The familiar small engine, big car combination has never been one to excite the enthusiastic driver but in a practical family vehicle like Renault's Grand Scenic, it can work. Of course, it helps if the powerplant in question is Renault's consistently impressive 1.5-litre dCi unit. Its healthy torque output makes up for a lack of outright power on journeys around town and out on the open road, progress isn't too strained. The real reward comes in the shape of running costs that few seven-seat vehicles can hope to match. Renault has done a fine job with this third generation Grand Scenic. It's still not the most involving car to drive in the MPV sector but that isn't really the point of a vehicle like this. Ride comfort is first class and refinement is also good, so long as the 1.5 dCi engine isn't flogged too hard. The cabin is well designed and extremely well built with classy materials and decent space in all three rows. The smallest dCi engine won't be the choice for high mileage drivers but everyone else should give it the benefit of any doubt.

JUST GRAND (new2) 24/06/2016

The new generation Renault Grand Scenic offers space for seven in a package that serves to remind us of Renault's years of expertise in this game. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Review

Renault was the first brand to properly meet the needs of compact MPV buyers wanting seven seats. This latest Grand Scenic model continues to effectively do just that, offering a more up-market feel and a smarter spin on a well established theme. Practical, safe, quiet, comfortable, efficient to run and relatively affordable, it ticks a lot of boxes.

Background

Back in 2004, Renault were first to introduce the concept of seven seats in a compact MPV, launching a Grand Scenic model that's gone on to be a very significant car for the brand. The second generation version, announced in 2009, proved so successful that it effectively rendered the brand's larger Espace MPV redundant. Here, we're looking at the MK3 model, altogether more sophisticated and stylish than its predecessor. Here, the design is far more stylish and driver-centric than before, plus there's more space and storage inside along with more sophisticated infotainment technology. A 'Hybrid Assist' diesel variant will tempt those in search of ultimate efficiency too. Sounds promising doesn't it?

Driving Experience

The Grand Scenic has never really garnered a reputation as a particularly sharp steer, but that suits the sort of customers who just want something comfortable and unthreatening to do the family duties. The bulk of sales will go on the dCi diesel engines which develop 110PS in 1.5-litre form, or 130 or 160PS in 1.6-litre guise. The best seller will be the 1.5 110PS dCi variant and this derivative is also being offered with clever 'Hybrid Assist' technology. Hybrid Assist functions with a 48-volt battery, enabling the electric motor to support the internal combustion engine, which remains in continuous operation. So far so practical. There's also a very attractive 1.3-litre TCe turbo petrol unit in 115 and 140PS guises which is well worth a look if you don't cover such big mileages. In terms of the way this Renault will drive, well as before, don't expect pin-sharp handling, with the emphasis instead on supple comfort. The way MPV buyers like it.

Design and Build

This is a bigger car than its second generation predecessor, 75mm longer, 15mm higher and 2mm wider. As significantly, there's 35mm more wheelbase. That's not enough to make this Grand Scenic a rival to really large MPVs like Volkswagen's Sharan, but it'll make it easier for this Renault to be considered as a really credible alternative to the largest compact MPV in the segment, Ford's S-MAX. It certainly looks sharper than before. The styling is based on Renault's R-Space concept car, key features like the steeply-raked windscreen and short bonnet heightening the elegance of this Grand Scenic's MPV silhouette. Uniquely, big 20-inch wheels are fitted to all versions. At the same time, the three-part screen combines a panoramic view with improved side vision. At the front, there's a more distinctive lighting signature. Depending on version, the C-shaped front headlights benefit from LED PURE VISION technology, while Edge Light technology provides the taillights with a 3D effect. The boot of this third generation model boasts a volume of 718-litres when the third seating row isn't in use; that compares to the 572-litre figure you get from the standard Scenic model. Plus around the car, there's total additional stowage capacity of 63-litres. Take the 'Easy Life drawer', which faces the front passenger seat and offers a storage area of 11.5-litres. That's three litres more than a conventional glove box. Lit and chilled, it opens via an electronic sensor and automatically locks when the vehicle stops. Plus, as before, there are four underfloor compartments.

Market and Model

There's the usual premium of around £1,800 to get this Grand Scenic seven-seat bodyshape over the ordinary five-seat Scenic model. That means prices as before, are likely to sit in the £23,500 to £32,500 bracket. A key new safety addition this time round is the AEBS 'Active Emergency Braking System' which also has a Pedestrian Protection feature. Lane Keeping Assist and a Fatigue Detection system are additionally being offered. Along with Adaptive Cruise Control, Lane Departure Warning, a Safe Distance Warning system, 'Traffic Sign Recognition with Over Speed Prevention' and Blind Spot Warning. Buyers can also specify a reversing camera, automatic dipped and main beam headlights, front, rear and side parking sensors and Easy Park Assist hands-free parking. Higher-end versions are equipped with Renault's advanced 'R-LINK 2' infotainment system, complete with an 8.7-inch screen. Here, you get voice recognition for the navigation system, telephone use, apps and radio. There's also the option of a full-colour head-up display system that projects key driving information onto the bottom of the windscreen. And Renault also hopes it can tempt buyers into paying more for a desirable 11-speaker BOSE Surround Sound audio system.

Cost of Ownership

The Grand Scenic may no longer have the lowest running costs in its class but they're still impressively low for a car of this size. The efficiency champion will be the 1.5-litre dCi 110PS diesel model that comes with the brand's clever 'Hybrid Assist' system that works with a 48-volt battery and provides an electric motor to support the diesel engine. Even if you can't stretch to that variant though, you should find this to be a very frugal MPV. In conventional form for example, the 110PS 1.5-litre diesel model should return nearly 70mpg on the combined cycle and not much more than 100g/km of CO2. As you would expect, all Grand Scenic models are aided in achieving their figures by a Stop & Start system that cuts the engine when you don't need it, stuck n traffic or waiting at the lights. Most buyers will want to consider the 'Renault 4+' programme which provides retail customers with a comprehensive four year/100,000 mile warranty, free routine servicing for four years or 48,000 miles, includes four years of roadside assistance cover and offers up to four years of lease or PCP finance, subject to status.

Summary

You might think your day-to-day family car journeys are mind-bogglingly dull but there are numerous models on the market locked in ferocious competition for the right to come along for the ride. If your brood needs everyday space for five and occasional room for seven, then here's one of the best of them, should you be seeking a seven-seater that's big enough for the family, without suggesting to the world that you've your own reserved parking space down at the maternity unit. It'll certainly help in the showroom that the looks of this third generation version are now trendier - plus it's significantly more practical where it counts - inside. On top of that, build quality is strong, running costs are low and safety is outstanding. Overall then, a car that shows Renault still has its finger firmly on the pulse of what modern families are looking for. This is Europe's most popular family MPV for a reason.

SETTING THE SCENE (family) 24/06/2016

Renault is proud to build proper 7-seat MPVs and June Neary likes its style.

Will It Suit Me?

Although a 4x4 would be trendier and a family saloon might be sportier, there's nothing to touch a proper 7-seat MPV for versatility and the ability to cope with the logistical problems that family life has a habit of throwing up. That's why I was eager to get to grips with the latest Renault Grand Scenic. I have a lot of appreciation for the job that these vehicles do and Renault's offering has been one of the leading lights in the sector for a long time. The Grand Scenic is the extended seven-seat version of the standard five-seater Scenic and it gives you the option of either having two child-sized seats in the rear or folding them down to produce a larger luggage area. That's only the tip of the iceberg so far as interior adjustments go, with all the rear seats capable of shifting around so the most can be made of the available space. The exterior of this MK3 model Grand Scenic is a bit more exciting than before but it still didn't really excite me too much: few MPVs do. As usual, the main point of the shape is to maximise the amount of space inside. It's also a very large vehicle, which might prove daunting to some but for me, the size didn't look like anything I couldn't get used to.

Practicalities

Being very nearly the size of an old Espace, which used to be Renault's largest MPV, the Grand Scenic should be big inside and is. The front seats are comfortable, with plenty of room and a good view out. In the second row, three adults can be accommodated without any difficulty and leg room is as generous as that of anything in the mid-sized MPV class. Slide the second row seats forward a touch and it's also possible to seat a couple of six-foot adults in the rear. Their knees will be bunched up a little as the chairs are set close to the floor but it's far from uncomfortable and smaller occupants will have no problem. These third row seats fold into the flat boot floor in a one-touch motion increasing boot space to as much as 718-litres. The middle row of seats can fold and tumble forwards, enabling reasonably dignified access to the third row, or be removed completely to create a massive removal van-like space of well over 2,000-litres. Seat back trays, a deep glovebox and segmented door pockets add to the Grand Scenic's strong practicality score.

Behind the Wheel

You approach a seven-seat MPV measuring over 4.6m from nose to tail with certain expectations about how it will drive but it's worth giving the Grand Scenic the benefit of the doubt. Comfort is the priority and rightly so but Renault has also managed to instil a high degree of poise and manoeuvrability. With its suspension system lifted from the Megane, the Grand Scenic resists cornering roll well and has plenty of grip at the front wheels. The ride quality is first class, the car tiptoeing over poor road surfaces and avoiding wobbliness on sudden undulations. The steering is sometimes too light and the manual gearbox isn't the slickest but in general, and considering the Grand Scenic's family remit, Renault has got the balance just about right. I tried the 1.6-litre dCi 130 diesel model. It had plenty of power, even for moving a Grand Scenic with the family and quite a bit of baggage on board. Refinement was good and although we only sat on the motorways for half an hour or so, it was enough to appreciate that the Grand Scenic would be a very accomplished companion on a long journey. There's also a lower-powered 1.5 dCi diesel with 110PS and the option of clever 'Hybrid Assist' technology. Alternatively, there's a very good turbo 1.2-litre petrol variant with either 115 or 130PS on tap. Despite its size, the Grand Scenic is straightforward to manoeuvre, the process aided by good visibility out of the front. In tight situations on the road, it doesn't feel as large as it actually is and anyone who's ruled out a seven-seat vehicle because they're worried about the awkwardness of its dimensions should give this one a go.

Value For Money

As much as you vow it won't, having kids changes you. It changes your priorities and your viewpoint. It makes you more risk averse too and Renault realises this which is why the Grand Scenic has always scored so well in terms of safety. The Grand Scenic routinely scores maximum five-star ratings from Euro NCAP and this latest car is packed with features designed to avoid collisions and protect occupants should one occur. The car can be specified with automatic headlamps and wipers, cruise control with a speed-limiting function, bi-xenon headlamps that swivel to illuminate round bends and a seat-belt reminder that sounds if a rear-seatbelt is unbuckled. There's also ABS with brake assist and brake force distribution and ESC stability control with CSV understeer control. You get ISOFIX child seat anchor points too. There's the usual premium of around £1,800 to get this Grand Scenic seven-seat bodyshape over the ordinary five-seat Scenic model. That means prices as before, are likely to sit in the £23,500 to £32,500 bracket. Higher-end versions are equipped with Renault's advanced 'R-LINK 2' infotainment system, complete with an 8.7-inch screen. Here, you get voice recognition for the navigation system, telephone use, apps and radio.

Could I Live With One?

The Renault Scenic has been at or near the top of the compact MPV charts for years and Renault has learned a lot about what buyers in this sector want. The Grand Scenic represents that knowledge being put into practice. It isn't an MPV that tries to be sporty in any way. It's just spacious, user-friendly, safe and very solidly built. Some will find the the way it drives a little dull, but those with domestic situations which really require the versatility of a seven-seat vehicle will love the Renault's pragmatic approach. I did anyway.