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DON'T LEAVE DOGS IN HOT CARS

DON'T LEAVE DOGS IN HOT CARS

19/07/2021 17:32:09

GEM Motoring Assist is encouraging pet owners to ensure their animals are safe and comfortable on car journeys this week. The call comes as forecasters predict sunny and warmer weather for later in the week, with temperatures rising into the high 20s by the weekend. GEM chief executive Neil Worth warns that it's both dangerous and illegal to leave an animal in a hot vehicle. "If the dog becomes ill or dies, you are likely to face a charge of animal cruelty under the Animal Welfare Act 2006," he warns. "This offence can bring a prison sentence of up to six months and/or a fine of up to £20,000." GEM has compiled a short checklist designed to ensure dogs stay safe and comfortable on car journeys: Leave your dog at home on warmer days. If you do need to transport your dog, bring plenty of fresh drinking water, and a bowl. Ensure your dog is able to stay cool on a journey. Don't let your dog travel unrestrained. Instead, use a proper travel basket or crate to create a safer space. Dog seatbelts and travel harnesses are also available. Make plenty of stops on long journeys give your dog a good drink of water. Animals are unable to sweat in the way that humans can. Dogs cool themselves by panting and sweating through their paws, so it only take a a few minutes for dogs left in cars on hot days to begin experiencing the distressing symptoms of heatstroke. If you suspect your dog is developing heatstroke on a journey, stop somewhere safe and find somewhere cool and shady. However, if signs of heat exhaustion become apparent (for example excessive thirst, heavy panting, rapid pulse, fever, vomiting, glazed eyes, dizziness), you should go straight to a veterinary surgeon. If you see a pet in a vehicle on a hot day, take immediate action. For example, if you're in a supermarket, roadside service area or garden centre car park, note the car make, model, colour and registration number, then go inside and ask for an announcement to be made. If this doesn't bring the owner out, or you're in a location where finding the owner is impossible, then dial 999 and ask for the police.


CARS BECAME A QUIET PLACE TO WORK IN LOCKDOWN

CARS BECAME A QUIET PLACE TO WORK IN LOCKDOWN

12/07/2021 13:12:20

Four out of 10 households in the UK used their car as an additional space to work, place to relax or even to catch up on TV shows during the pandemic, according to new research by Peugeot. The study of 2,000 drivers found 41% of households with four or more people said they had started to use their car for other purposes than driving during Covid-19 lockdowns. With home schooling and remote working now the new normal for many, cars have taken up a new purpose, ranging from providing a relaxing refuge to acting as a remote office space. When asked which activities drivers had turned to in their cars, more than half said finding a quiet place to relax away from others, while for 47% their car became a place to catch up on TV shows, and 43% used their cars as a place to read books. A third of respondents said they have used their car as a remote office for work. With 58% of respondents struggling to find time for themselves during lockdown, the car has become a place of peace and quiet, according to the research. Peugeot also found 37% of households said they would be more likely to use their car in this way if they owned a zero emissions-capable vehicle, that did not emit fumes when turned on, allowing them to keep warm or stay cool without idling an engine.


WHAT REALLY MAKES US BUY CARS

WHAT REALLY MAKES US BUY CARS

05/07/2021 16:40:36

Sexy images of revving cars hugging tight bends at speed impact the viewer's mind less than seeing relevant people talking about the vehicle. That's the surprise research finding by Autovia. The research used a unique patented technology called Steady State Topography which measures second by second brain responses quantifying which moments of audio and visual content are encoded into long term memory. Readers of the popular Autovia title, evo were invited to browse articles and videos as they usually would while Neuro-Insight researchers measured the electrical activity in different regions of their brains. They could then see which moments impacted viewers most positively - and what was most likely to be instantly 'encoded' into memory. Around 80 evo readers were wired up and invited to read four articles about cars, in the way they usually would, without being told what the researchers were looking for. The surprising finding was that while dramatic external images of a performance road car naturally excited the viewers, what stuck in their minds and felt most relevant was when presenters were talking directly to the viewer about the cars, making them feel more involved.


BRITISH LAND SPEED HERO GETS ROLLS-ROYCE RECOGNITION

BRITISH LAND SPEED HERO GETS ROLLS-ROYCE RECOGNITION

05/07/2021 16:38:48

Rolls-Royce has been associated with world speed records on both land and water for more than a century. But while the exploits of Sir Malcolm Campbell are well documented and widely known, another British hero who set three land-speed records using Rolls-Royce engines has been largely overlooked by history. Now, after more than 80 years, Rolls-Royce recalls this hero's inspiring exploits. With the new Wraith and Dawn Black Badge Landspeed Collection, the marque uncovers and retells the remarkable story of the redoubtable Captain George Eyston, and his extraordinary car, Thunderbolt. Born in 1897, George Eyston was fascinated with motorsport from childhood, racing both cars and (under an assumed name) motorcycles while still at school. His degree in engineering at Trinity College, Cambridge, was interrupted by the Great War, in which he served with distinction, rising to the rank of captain and winning the Military Cross. He spent the 1920s and 30s developing and driving racing cars; a talented inventor, he also held a number of patents, particularly in the field of supercharging. In 1935, Eyston was among the first British racers to travel to the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, where he set new 24-hour and 48-hour endurance speed records. He subsequently received the Segrave Trophy, awarded to 'the British national who demonstrates Outstanding Skill, Courage and Initiative on Land, Water and in the Air'. In 1937, he returned to the Flats and went on to set three world land-speed records with Thunderbolt. This extraordinary machine had three axles, eight wheels and weighed seven tonnes, earning it monikers such as 'behemoth' and 'leviathan' in contemporary reports. The body was made from aluminium and, in its original form, had a blunt, heavyset profile topped with a large triangular tailfin.


DON'T LEAVE DOGS IN HOT CARS

21/06/2021 12:31:49

Summer has finally arrived but it doesn't come without its dangers. In 2019, the British Veterinary Association recorded a three year high in the number of dogs left in hot cars. Here's some advice on how to keep your pets safe and what to do if you find a dog suffering in a hot car. The facts are that within 10 minutes, a car temperature can increase by 10??C. The heat can be fatal to our furry friends so it's vital that new and experienced owners alike remember the facts: The inside of cars can heat up at an alarming rate, even if you only leave the car for a short amount of time: o 10 minutes can see a 10??C increase in temperature. o 20 minutes can see a 16??C increase in temperature. o 30 minutes can see a 19??C increase in temperature o One hour can see a 23??C increase in temperature o Over one hour can see a 24 to 29??C increase in temperature. Heat exhaustion can occur when the bodies temperature reaches 32??C Heatstroke can occur when the bodies temperature reaches over 40??C And remember, heatstroke can be deadly for dogs. Never leave an animal alone in a vehicle for any amount of time. When faced with the dilemma of leaving your pet alone or unloading the whole car and dragging a canine around while you quickly run an errand - you might be tempted to leave your poochy pal on their own for a few moments. However, even if you've taken precautions like parking in the shade and cracking a window, it's not enough. Dogs don't sweat like humans and can only lose heat through panting. This means they struggle to regulate their temperature if stuck in a hot space and the effects can be deadly. What to do if you see an animal left unattended in a car in the heat Call for the owner and alert staff if you're by a shop. If you see a dog alone in a car during summer, you should first check to see if the owner is nearby. If you're near a shop, inform the staff and security, they'll be able to make a shop-wide announcement to alert the owner. Then call 999. The local police have the authority to break a car window to rescue an animal in danger but you should not attempt to gain access to the vehicle as you could be fined for criminal damage or injure the animal inside the car. Check the doors and inform the police of your intentions. If there's no alternative, you should first check the doors to see if the car has been left unlocked. If you do have to break a window to save the animal make sure you call 999 and let the police know what you're doing and take photos and videos to clearly record the situation. You should also note down the license plate number and any witness details.



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