Kia Ceed 1.4 1 5dr Hatchback (2017) at Preston Motor Park Fiat and Volvo

he Kia Cee'd is a worthy addition to your shortlist if you need an attractive, practical and affordable family hatchback with a long warranty When the Kia name first appeared in the UK, it was on the nose of a budget supermini that appealed to buyers because it represented value for money more than anything else. So, the fact that Kia's latest range includes genuine all-rounders like the Cee'd family hatchback shows just how far the South Korean brand has come.

22/09/2017

4008

Manual

Petrol 47.1 combined MPG

BRONZE



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open quoteThe Ceed is spacious and comfortable and comes with a long warranty. It's a viable alternative to the usual class leaders . Personalised video available upon request - Ask about our Warranty4Lifeclose quote

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CO2: 138 g/km

MPG: 47.1

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Keys

Keys

Manuals

Manuals

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.4
Badge Power: 98
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: N
Coin Series: 1
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 7E
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 89
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 88
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 5
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 61
NCAP Safety Assist %: 86
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 20000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 999999
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 7
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: N
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: N
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO: 0.558
CO2 (g/km): 138
HC: 0.046
HC+NOx: N
Noise Level dB(A): 73
NOx: 0.008
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1368
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 72
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 84
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: MULTI POINT FUEL INJECTION
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 47.1
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 57.6
EC Urban (mpg): 36.2

Performance

0 to 60 mph (secs): True
0 to 62 mph (secs): 12.3
Engine Power - BHP: 98
Engine Power - KW: 73.6
Engine Power - RPM: 6000
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 99
Engine Torque - MKG: 13.7
Engine Torque - NM: 134
Engine Torque - RPM: 4000
Top Speed: 114

Tyres

Space Saver?: True
Tyre Size Front: 195/65 R15
Tyre Size Rear: 195/65 R15
Tyre Size Spare: SPACE SAVER
Wheel Style: N
Wheel Type: 15" STEEL

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1470
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 4310
Wheelbase: 2650
Width: 1780
Width (including mirrors): N

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 53
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1820
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1300
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 362
Max. Loading Weight: 566
Max. Roof Load: 80
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 1200
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 600
Minimum Kerbweight: 1254
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 10.6

KOREAN CLEVERNESS (new2) 08/06/2018

Kia has taken a further step forward in the family hatchback sector with the third generation Ceed. Jonathan Crouch checks it out.

Ten Second Review

In this third generation guise, Kia's Ceed further sharpens its proposition in the Focus-class family hatchback segment, with smarter looks, extra technology and the option of clever 'level 2' camera safety technology. As before, value continues as a strong suit and there's an industry-leading warranty. Potentially then, there's a lot to like here.

Background

If you want to better appreciate just why Kia is one of the world's fastest growing automotive brands, you've only to look at this car, the Ceed family hatchback. The Slovakian factory that builds it only opened its doors in 2006 yet already, well over a million cee'd models have been built. Automotive historians will look back at the original cee'd as a landmark design, the first to take on the European and Japanese market leaders on their own terms in the volume Focus and Golf-dominated Family Hatchback sector. Built in the heart of Europe, it was targeted at the heart of the European motor industry, hence the unusual 'cee'd' name, a combination of the French abbreviation for European Community (CE) and this car's project title (ED). It shamed the established players by matching their quality while massively undercutting their prices and offering an astonishingly long 7-year warranty. But times change - and so do market segments. So Kia has re-designed this car with a more athletic look and added more efficient engines and extra technology.

Driving Experience

You can't fault the way that Kia has gone about this. Clearly, someone in Seoul has looked at just what makes the best family hatchbacks great and gone to much trouble to try and emulate them. In fact, the latest fully-independent suspension system is much more sophisticated than the cruder torsion beam arrangement you get on mainstream Golf and Focus models and aims to provide drivers with more agile and immediate handling responses, complemented by revised spring and damper rates and a faster steering rack. The ride has been developed on Europe's wide variety of road surfaces, remaining comfortable while giving drivers the confidence of tighter body control under cornering and stability at higher speeds. Some of this tuning happened in the UK to ensure the Ceed performs well on our unique roads. Under the bonnet, petrol options include an updated version of Kia's popular 1.0-litre T-Gdi engine, producing 118bhp, as well as a new 1.4-litre T-Gdi power unit. Replacing the earlier 1.6-litre GDI unit, the new 'Kappa' 1.4-litre T-Gdi powerplant produces 138bhp. In addition, this Ceed gets Kia's latest 'U3' diesel with 114bhp and 280Nm of torque. Every engine is paired with a six-speed manual transmission, while the 1.4-litre T-Gdi and 1.6-litre CRDi engines are also available with Kia's seven-speed double-clutch transmission.

Design and Build

The look of this third generation Ceed is the work of Kia's styling chiefs Gregory Guillaume and Peter Schreyer and aims to carry forward the emotional appeal of recent brand models like the Stinger GT. It's constructed on Kia's latest 'K2' platform and is lower, wider and has a longer rear overhang than the car it replaces, plus there's a 'cab-rearward' silhouette that's supposed to exhibit 'a more mature sense of athleticism'. Straight lines replace the rounded-off edges of the previous model, evolving the front of the car with a wider 'tiger-nose' grille and lower air intake, and precise, linear shapes framing its 'face'. Inside the cabin, there's more headroom in the front row and a lower driving position. Higher-quality materials have been used throughout and surfaces are finished with metallic or satin chrome trim, with buyers able to choose from a range of cloth, synthetic leather or genuine leather upholstery. The dash is split into an upper area - for the 'floating' touchscreen infotainment system - and a lower area, housing controls for audio and heating and ventilation. Driver-centric in its layout, the centre console is angled slightly towards the driver's seat for ease of use on the move. Out back, there's a larger, 395-litre boot, as well as greater shoulder room for rear passengers.

Market and Model

Pricing sits in the £18,500 to £29,000 bracket for the five-door hatchback body shape - there's also an alternative Sportswagon estate variant. Whichever Ceed you choose, you'd expect to find it decently equipped - it is - but the key change this time round is the addition of much more safety technology. In addition to the car's seven standard airbags, included kit runs to High Beam Assist, Driver Attention Warning, Lane Keeping Assist and Forward Collision Warning autonomous braking with Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist. Plus Kia's now moving into the realm of 'Level Two' autonomous driving technology. This MK3 Ceed is available with Lane Following Assist, which tracks vehicles in front of the vehicle in traffic, and identifies appropriate spaces in other lanes to move into safely to gain more ground in heavy congestion. It detects road markings to keep the Ceed in its lane on the motorway, and controls acceleration, braking and steering depending on the convoy of vehicles in front. Additional available technologies include Smart Cruise Control with Stop & Go, Blind Spot Collision Warning, Rear Cross-Traffic Collision Warning, Smart Parking Assist, and pedestrian recognition with haptic steering wheel warnings for the Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist system.

Cost of Ownership

No car in this sector can afford to go to market with second-rate economy and emissions figures. So how does this one fare? The 1.0-litre T-GDi petrol engine delivers emissions rated at 122g/km. For the 1.4-litre T-Gdi power unit, emissions are rated at 127g/km when fitted with the seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. Manual models emit 132g/km. The big news with this third generation model is Kia's latest 'U3' diesel engine. Designed to go beyond the stricter limits laid down by the latest Euro 6d TEMP emissions standard, this 1.6-litre CRDi (Common-Rail Direct injection) unit uses Selective Catalytic Reduction active emissions control technology to significantly reduce emissions. Hence a reduction in particulate matter and Nox compared to earlier Kia diesel engines. And improved CO2 readings of course. With a six-speed manual transmission, the 114bhp version emits 99g/km of CO2. Models fitted with a dual-clutch transmission produce 105g/km. As usual, there's also Kia's lengthy 7-year warranty as part of the deal.

Summary

There will still be people of course, who'll blindly buy a Focus, a Golf or some other family hatchback from a conventional mainstream brand without considering its Korean alternative. But these will largely be uninformed folk yet to fully cotton on to the way that products in this segment have changed. Thanks to the continuing success of this Ceed model line, there are fewer and fewer customers of this kind around. Of course, shortlist selection isn't the same as a sale. There are family hatch folk who'll want more powerful engines or more dynamic handling than this car can offer. But, I'd suggest, many more will enjoy this Kia's sharp looks, impressive quality, strong safety standards and low running costs. True, the asking prices may be a little higher than you might expect from a South Korean brand, but don't judge them until you've tried the product, a confident design from a very confident brand. We think you might like it.

KOREA CAN DO (used) 26/08/2016

By Jonathan Crouch

Introduction

In its original second generation form, Kia's cee'd no longer only looked to undercut Focus-class family hatchbacks: it wanted to tackle them on equal terms at equal prices. That meant it had to be very good indeed. Still, sharper looks, great quality and higher technology promised much. How does this model stack up as a used buy?

Models

5dr hatchback, 3dr coupe, 5dr SW estate (1.6 diesel, 1.4, 1.6 petrol [cee'd 1, cee'd 2, cee'd 3, cee'd 4])

History

The rise and rise of the Korean motor industry has been one of the enduring industrial stories of the last decade, right up there with Google, Apple and Facebook and every bit as impressive. From an embarrassing budget brand base, marques like Kia have in recent years been embarrassing mainstream makers with style and high technology at sensible prices. It was an evolution that took less than ten years and one that all began with one car - the cee'd family hatchback, launched in 2007, but better established in the much smarter and more sophisticated second generation guise we're going to look at here. Automotive historians will look back at the original cee'd as a landmark car, the first to take on the European and Japanese market leaders on their own terms, especially in the volume Focus and Golf-dominated Family Hatchback sector. Built in the heart of Europe, it was targeted at the heart of the European motor industry, hence the unusual 'cee'd' name, a combination of the French abbreviation for European Community (CE) and this car's project title (ED). It shamed the established players by matching their quality while massively undercutting their prices and offering an astonishingly long 7-year warranty. And the result was a sensation, with nearly half a million European sales. Creating the second generation version though, was much harder. After all, converting customers into a new brand is always possible if the product is right and its prices low. But selling this cee'd for the same kind of money people would pay for a Focus or a Golf? At this MK2 model's original launch in 2012, we wondered if that might be a step too far, even for a brand as ambitious as this one. To pull it off, this second generation model needed to be nothing less than a showcase for everything the Korean company knew about design, quality, engineering and technology. Fortunately, it was. Kia offered buyers a choice of five-door hatch, SW estate and three-door 'pro_cee'd bodystyles. The original MK2 model we look at here sold until the Autumn of 2015, when it was replaced by a significantly revised facelifted version.

What You Get

You might have heard people complaining that almost all cars in this class look pretty much the same. That's because there's only so much you can do with a total length that tends to be just under four and a half metres, into which you've got to slot five people, their gear, an engine and transmission - and then ensure it doesn't look like an MPV. In nature, this is known as 'convergent evolution'; where species evolve separately but end up looking alike. That's not to say that Kia has produced a bland car. Quite the opposite. In second generation form, the cee'd has a more contemporary stance that's both longer and lower than its predecessor, with the rising beltline giving the five-door hatchback a more aggressive, dynamic wedge shape. All very nice, but a more dynamic shape is usually a less practical one if, as in this case, it's based on essentially the same platform with the same wheelbase as the previous generation design. So how can Kia claim this car to be the most practical option from its era in the family hatchback segment? We always think the acid test here is found on the back seat. That lower roof height has been more than compensated for with a lower ride height, so even tall folk are better catered for, with 12mm more roof space than before. And the 50mm of extra body length that this car enjoys over its MK1 model predecessor has translated into 21mm of extra space for their legs too, so a six foot tall passenger can sit behind someone in front of them of a similar size. True, the narrower cabin puts paid to any idea of being able to comfortably transport three adults here for any distance but we're struggling to think of any car in this class that can do that anyway. Three kids will be quite comfortable. The extra body length also provides for a boot that's 40-litres bigger than the MK1 cee'd, offering a 380-litre capacity that's 20% bigger than that of a comparable Ford Focus from this era. That advantage is maintained when you push forward the split-folding rear bench to free up a useful 1,318-litres of total fresh air. And at the wheel? Well, the fascia layout is neat, though there are rather a lot of buttons. What's important though is that this is a classy place to be, with improvements in quality that are actual as well as perceived. Soft-touch surfaces, high-quality materials with chromed highlights, damped sun visors and lidded storage areas, subtle red ambient lighting, tactile door grab handles and precise panel gaps all combine to give the interior of this cee'd a solid, mature, almost premium feel. Walk around the car and you'll find tight shutlines wouldn't look out of place on a Lexus. This is clearly a design that's had a great deal of money spent on its execution.

What You Pay

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What to Look For

The cee'd has proven an extremely reliable car, with both petrol engines and the diesel motor scoring well in reliability surveys. Customers have noted that some of the interior finishes can get scratched quite easily and the alloy wheels fitted to top models are quite easy to kerb. Other than that, it's a clean bill of health. Kia's brilliant seven-year warranty arrangement means that these vehicles very rarely fall into premature neglect.

Replacement Parts

(approx prices, based on a 2013 1.6 cee'd 2) Kia spares prices have gained an enviable reputation for good value, and replacement parts for the cee'd are no exception. A clutch assembly is around £150, whilst front brake pads weigh in at around £40. An alternator will cost around £130, and for a starter motor you'll be looking at £120.

On the Road

You can't fault the way that Kia has gone about this. Clearly, someone in Seoul has looked at just what makes the best family hatchbacks great and gone to much trouble to try and emulate them. In the original MK1 version of this car, that meant the same clever multi-link rear suspension system pioneered by Ford's Focus and copied by Volkswagen's Golf, something that's still not the norm in this segment. With this second generation model, Kia went further. Think our steering system lacks feel? No problem: here's a Flex Steer system so you can choose your level of feedback. Believe our petrol engines to be ordinary? Here's a state-of-the-art direct injection unit. Find our automatic gearbox antiquated? Check out this hi-tech double-clutch version. But you don't achieve perfection merely by ticking boxes. The cee'd still won't be first choice if yours is habitually a dynamic driving style. And the main reason why is tinged with irony: a lack of feel through the steering. Isn't that dealt with by the Flex Steer system? Well it can't be on entry-level cee'd models because they don't get it. Those variants that do have this set-up offer their drivers a button on the wheel that enables selection between 'Comfort', 'Normal' and 'Sport' modes. Given that 'Comfort' is rather light and 'Sport' artificially heavy, you end up leaving it in 'Normal' all the time, which rather defeats the point. And is essentially as lifeless as the steering system in the previous version of this car. As we said when trying the same set-up in Hyundai's i30, we know electric steering is difficult to get right but it'd be better next time for the engineers to simply develop one set-up that's direct and incisive. Does all this matter? Probably not. Forget what the motoring mags tell you, family hatchback buyers as a whole don't prioritise on-the-limit handling - and never will. What's important is that, Focus and Golf apart, this cee'd is an easy match for just about any other family hatchback rival in terms of body control, handling response and chassis balance, thanks to a structure that's 45% stiffer than the MK1 model could offer and a front end offering effective bite as you turn into sharp corners. Building in any more capability than this car now has is arguably pointless, given that the range doesn't offer any of the really pokey powerplants that would tempt in more spirited drivers. The mainstream line-up after all, is based around just two engine sizes - 1.4 and 1.6. The smaller unit comes in petrol form with 98bhp or as a CRDi diesel with 89bhp. More sophisticated though, are the 1.6s, fitted as they are with the ISG 'Intelligent Stop & Go' system that makes both the 133bhp petrol GDI and the 126bhp CRDi diesel impressively green and frugal. These models are certainly as rapid as most owners will need them to be, the diesel 1.6 making sixty from rest in 11.5s on the way to 122mph, a second and a half and 16mph quicker than its 1.4-litre CRDi counterpart. There's a bigger difference between the two petrol variants though, the direct injection 133bhp GDI petrol unit in the cee'd 1.6 making sixty in 9.8s, over two and a half seconds quicker than the petrol 1.4, on the way to 118mph. The 1.6-litre GDI was the model Kia chose to use to launch the company's first dual-clutch automatic gearbox, this 6-speed DCT unit one of those clever transmissions able to seamlessly select the next gear before you've even left the last one. With its steering wheel gearshift paddles and silky-smooth change pattern, it was definitely a step forward but wasn't very efficient. Which for us makes the 6-speed manual 'box that's standard across the range the default choice. Overall, a seat at the wheel of this car is a very pleasant place to spend your time. The driving position is excellent, the seats and the wheel feel good and all-round visibility is better than many rivals: in fact, thanks to those quarter windows in the front pillars, it's better than its cousin the Hyundai i30. Though there's perhaps a touch more road and wind noise than you'd get in, say, a Golf, the muted engine note ensures that refinement levels are quite good enough to encourage lengthy journeys, though on them, you might find the ride a touch firmer than many will expect.

Overall

There will still be some buyers of used family hatchback of course, who'll blindly buy a Focus, a Golf or some other contender in this class from a conventional mainstream brand without considering its Korean alternative. But these will largely be uninformed folk yet to fully cotton on to the way that products in this segment have changed. Thanks to the success of this cee'd, there are fewer and fewer customers of this kind around. Of course, shortlist selection isn't the same as a sale. There are family hatch folk who'll want more powerful engines or more dynamic handling than this car can offer. But, we'd suggest, many more will enjoy this Kia's sharp looks, impressive quality, class-leading practicality and low running costs. True, the asking prices may be a little higher than you might expect from a South Korean brand, but don't judge them until you've tried the product, a confident design from a very confident brand. We think you might like it.

BUILT TO SUCCEED (family) 08/06/2018

June Neary is surprised by Kia's impressive family hatchback offering, the Ceed

Will It Suit Me?

It wasn't long ago that a Kia was something you bought on price. You'd really rather have had something else but Kia did it for less. Not quite as smartly and effectively perhaps but you bought a Kia and you got the job done. When the second generation Ceed was launched in 2012, the market realised that it was time to start looking at this Korean brand in a different way. Here was a car that was at least as good as the Family Hatchback class favourites - Astras, Focus's and Meganes - but costed less to buy and to own. That's a proposition further improved by the third generation version we're looking at here and it's certainly one that works for me.

Practicalities

For someone like me who in the past has had some experience of some frankly rather poor South Korean products, the reality of climbing aboard this Kia comes as something of a shock. From the moment the doors thunk shut to the dawning that some of the interior finishes are class-leading, the Ceed has the capacity to surprise. Even the base-spec 1.0-litre T-GDI petrol variant carries the right stuff in its DNA. It's not flashy. It won't be the darling of the style set but it's a whole lot more car than you could imagine at this price point. There's plenty of space in the rear and I had no problem lumping child seats in and out - or with the weekly Tesco shop. The plastics seem pretty hard-wearing and the design seems as child-proof as it's possible to get at this price point.

Behind the Wheel

The earlier MK2 Ceed model was rather let down by its feeble, somewhat inefficient entry-level petrol engines but buyers of this MK3 version now get much better options. These include an updated version of Kia's popular 1.0-litre T-GDi engine, producing 118bhp. This revvy little unit is a big improvement and for me, seems economical enough to make opting for diesel power somewhat pointless unless you regularly cover a lot of miles. There's also a new 1.4-litre T-GDi power unit. Replacing the earlier 1.6-litre GDI unit, the new 'Kappa' 1.4-litre T-GDi powerplant produces 138bhp. In addition, this Ceed gets Kia's latest 'U3' diesel with 114bhp. Every engine is paired with a six-speed manual transmission, while the 1.4-litre T-GDi and 1.6-litre CRDi engines are also available with Kia's seven-speed double-clutch transmission.

Value For Money

No need for a crash course in Kia trim level nomenclature. The manufacturer has thoughtfully kept things simple by presenting buyers with a standard choice of Ceed 2 and Ceed 3 models and this design comes as a five-door hatchback or an Sportswagon estate. Prices start at around £18,500. Crucially, and as any Kia dealer will be at pains to remind you, all Ceeds come with Kia's excellent 7-year/100,000-mile warranty. Whichever Ceed you choose, you'd expect to find it decently equipped - it is - but the key change this time round is the addition of much more safety technology. In addition to the car's seven standard airbags, included kit runs to High Beam Assist, Driver Attention Warning, Lane Keeping Assist and Forward Collision Warning autonomous braking with Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist.

Could I Live With One?

Rather to my surprise, the answer is yes. Some of the other cars in the sector still feel slightly more sophisticated but the price saving and that achingly long warranty of this improved Ceed would more than make up for that. Here is a Kia that needs no apologies - a car that sells on quality as well as price. If you're buying a family hatch in this sector, it's an alternative you can't afford to ignore.

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