Ford EcoSport 1.5 TDCi 95 Zetec 5dr - Rear Parking Sensors, Bluetooth & 16in Alloys Diesel Hatchback (2017) at County Motor Works Vauxhall

01245 932 703

£9,500

WAS £12,750, SAVE £3,250

Specification of this our Ford EcoSport includes Rear Parking Sensors, 16in 5-Spoke Magnetic painted alloy wheels, Chrome-finish front grille, Headlamps with LED day running lights, Front fog lights, Quickclear windscreen with heated washer jets, Electrically-operated and heated door mirrors, Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS), Electronic Stability Programme (ESP) with Hill Launch Assist, Manual air conditioning, Remote central locking, Leather handbrake and gear-knob, Rake/reach adjustable steering, Power front and much more.

19/12/2017

35654

Manual

Diesel 64.2 combined MPG

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Andrew Wragg

Andrew Wragg
Brand Manager

Manager's Comment

Our Ford EcoSport is a small SUV with room for four adults and handling that's refreshingly fun for a high-riding car with relatively city-friendly dimensions.

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Emissions and Fuel

CO2:
115 g/km

MPG:
64.2

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* Price does not include road fund license

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16in5-Spoke Magnetic painted alloy wheels, Chrome-finish front grille, Headlamps with LED day running lights, Front fog lights, Quickclear windscreen with heated washer jets, Electrically-operated and heated door mirrors, Tyre Pressure Monitoring System TPMS, Electronic Stability Programme ESP with Hill Launch Assist, Manual air conditioning, Remote central locking, Leather handbrake and gear-knob, Rake/reach adjustable steering, Power front & rear windows, Trip computer, Front and rear floor mats, Height/lumber adjustment on driver's seat, Rake adjustable rear seating, Thatcham alarm, Ford Easy Fuel capless refuelling system.

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.5
Badge Power: 95
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: TDCi 95
Coin Series: Zetec
Generation Mark: 2
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 10E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 1
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 93
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 77
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 4
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 58
NCAP Safety Assist %: 55
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 12500
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 60000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: 120
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: 125000
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO: 0.202
CO2 (g/km): 115
HC: N
HC+NOx: 0.118
Noise Level dB(A): 69
NOx: 0.164
Particles: 0.0007
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1498
Compression Ratio: 16.0:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 73.5
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 88.3
Engine Code:
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: COMMON RAIL
Gears: 5 SPEED
Number of Valves: 8
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 64.2
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 65.7
EC Urban (mpg): 58.9

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 14
Engine Power - BHP: 95
Engine Power - KW: 70
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 3750
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 159
Engine Torque - MKG: 21.9
Engine Torque - NM: 215
Engine Torque - RPM: 1750
Top Speed: 99

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 205/60 R16
Tyre Size Rear: 205/60 R16
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: 6x2 SPOKE
Wheel Type: 16" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1633
Height (including roof rails): 1650
Length: 4017
Wheelbase: 2519
Width: 1765
Width (including mirrors): 2057

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 52
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1760
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1238
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 310
Max. Loading Weight: 390
Max. Roof Load: 40
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 700
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 690
Minimum Kerbweight: 1370
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 10.6

ANOTHER QUESTION OF SPORT (used) 26/02/2018

By Jonathan Crouch

Introduction

The Ford EcoSport takes the underpinnings of the brand's Fiesta supermini and reworks them to better tackle the urban jungle. Back in 2013, this was a late arrival in the small Crossover class, but it brought the segment something different in a cute but rugged package that many target buyers liked. Compromises were made with this model's design approach, but if you're city-bound but adventurous at heart, there'll be plenty to like here.

Models

5dr SUV (Petrol - 1.5, 1.0 EcoBoost / 1.5 TDCi diesel)

History

Back in 2002, Ford did something very unusual. It missed an opportunity. The occasion was the launch of a model called the Fusion, a kind of Fiesta-on-stilts that offered a trendier, chunkier, more practical, yet more stylish take on Britain's best selling car. More than a decade on, in 2013, we were given the model that vehicle should - and could - have been. It was called the Ford EcoSport. You might recognise the kind of car this is. There are, after all, plenty of them about these days, supermini-based so-called 'Crossover' models offering SUV style and attitude in a trendier, more versatile small package. Back at the turn of the century, the Fusion could have brought the market exactly that - and done so nearly a decade before segment-defining small Crossovers like Nissan's Juke came along. Ford even presented it in trendy 4x4 regalia in motorshow concept form, but shrank back from selling the car that way in the showrooms, where it was merely presented as a slightly bigger, slightly more versatile kind of Fiesta. That mistake wasn't of course made with this EcoSport which, like its class counterparts, was marketed from the start with the full 'urban jungle' treatment. It doesn't have 4WD because the city streets and school run pavements of its natural habitat don't need it, but its raised driving position and chunky looks offer up a bit of Amazonian attitude, even if in truth, this car is more CBeebies than SAS in its take on hostile streetlife. The tall sides, faux-4x4 undertrays and big bumpers all suggest something originally intended to be an SUV but whose designer thought better of it at the last minute. This though, is what the market wants. Every mainstream manufacturer today either offers a supermini-based Crossover car of this sort. Indeed, Ford could still have entered this segment earlier if it had brought us the first generation version of this car that was designed and engineered solely for the South American market. Wisely perhaps, the Blue Oval chose not to. Just as with its larger Kuga Crossover model, the approach instead was wait, watch the opposition then try and come up with something better. Whether this EcoSport represented just that was debateable. It was updated with suppler suspension and various interior embellishments in 2015 and 2016 and a 140PS version of the 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol engine arrived in the range in 2015. Ford fundamentally facelifted the car in early 2018. It's the re-facelift versions though, that we're looking at here as a potential used buy.

What You Get

The EcoSport is a real global effort, designed in Brazil, with the version launched in 2013 built in India. It leans heavily on Ford's so-called Kinetic2 design language, with its large trapezoidal grille, smeared back headlights, short overhangs and an interesting blend of sharp angles and more organic curves that try to soften a front end sheerer than the North Face of the Eiger. Joao Ramos' design team were clearly aiming for a bit of SUV attitude, but some may feel the finished result sails a little close to cuteness, with a look described by one writer as being akin to a Chihuahua in a studded collar. The Blue Oval brand will probably argue this to be exactly what many potential buyers would want - and we wouldn't disagree. The sharp-looking headlights feature LED running strips, there are indicators integrated into the door mirrors and there's a decent amount of shape and style in the flanks. As with most designs of this kind, it's very sensitive to colour and trim choice, so if you're a potential buyer, we'd spend a bit of time on selecting the right shade and considering wheel rim sizes. Talking of wheels brings us to the issue of the rear-mounted spare that you had to have when this car was originally launched. In 2015, Ford made this feature optional. If your EcoSport does feature this embellishment, you'll get a crossover harking back to the SUV-look of the Nineties, which apparently is still very much in vogue in this car's home Brazilian market, where quick and easy access to the spare wheel is essential for safety reasons. That's all well and good but this is supposed to be a 'global' Ford design and the company should have known from the start that outside of the tropics, buyers generally don't take to this feature. This isn't necessarily because they don't like the rugged look. Or because they don't want the kind of proper full-sized spare wheel that's such a rare feature in most of today's modern cars. No, buyers don't like it because a huge spare wheel on the back means you can't fit a conventional top-hinged tailgate and the side-opening rear door you must have instead creates all kinds of awkwardness when you're trying to access the boot when backed into a tight parking space. Even if your EcoSport of choice doesn't feature a tailgate-mounted spare wheel, there's still the issue that the side-opening door is hinged on the left side. That means it opens away from the pavement, so when you get your stuff out, you can't put it straight onto the safety of the sidewalk. Instead, you've to put it onto the ground, then move it out of the path of the door before it can be shut. This wouldn't be such an issue if the kind of opening rear door glass section you get on many modern estates and SUVs was present here for getting smaller items in and out. But unfortunately, this feature was never made available. All that said, you soon learn to live with the side-opening tailgate - maybe even to like it. Toyota LandCruiser owners seem to. As for boot space, well the 346-litre capacity isn't one of the largest in the segment. Still, it is over 40% more than the pathetic total you'd get in a rival Nissan Juke. If you want more space and can flatten the 60:40 split-folding rear bench, then up to 1,238-litres is available. Transport of bulkier stuff will be aided by the way that the smart standard-fit aluminium roof rails enable bikes and roofboxes to go up top quite easily. On to rear seat space. Getting in isn't especially easy as the door aperture is quite narrow, but once inside, you'll find the back of an EcoSport a surprisingly pleasant place to be thanks not only to the high, airy roofline but also to the fact that the rear seats are set slightly above those in the front for a better view out. Of course, as with all cars in this class, there'll be the issue of restricted width if, rather optimistically, you're trying to cram three full-sized adults in the back, but a trio of kids will be fine. And up front? Well, the Fiesta DNA that's lacking in the exterior looks is certainly well in evidence here, most notably with the mobile phone-style array of buttons on the centre console. It's a button-fest that can seem rather overly complex at first, but one you quickly adjust to. The six-way adjustable driver's seat offers a supportively commanding perch and the instruments are clear and concise. As for build quality, well you could easily guess that one of these is screwed together in an Indian factory from the hard, utilitarian plastics used around much of the dash. Still, it all feels solid and Ford's European division has done its best to plush things up with this smart gearstick and leather-trimmed multi-function steering wheel. It's a practical cabin too. The odd coat hook would have been nice but in terms of stowage space, owners are undeniably well provided for with no fewer than twenty different cubbies and compartments for 'phones, sunglasses, coins, cups, drinks and chocolate bars. You get properly sized doorbins able to swallow a 1.5-litre bottle of water, a decently sized cooled glovebox that can hold six 330ml cans, large seatback pockets and a drawer under the front passenger seat to keep valuable items away from prying eyes.

What You Pay

Please contact us for an exact up-to-date valuation.

What to Look For

We found lots of satisfied EcoSport customers but inevitably, our survey revealed quite a few issues too. One owner complained of a transmission shudder. Another found his audio system completely shutting down. In one instance, the airbags failed to deploy. And a few owners have recorded start-up problems. It's extremely unlikely that this car will have ventured beyond a paved surface, so you'll just need to look for the usual scratched alloys and evidence of child damage in the back. The cabin plastics mark easily, so check them carefully; this could be grounds for a small price reduction. As usual, check that the service book is fully stamped up to date. Some ex-fleet models may have missed out on garage visits.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a 2013 EcoSport 1.0 EcoBoost - Ex Vat) An air filter costs around £13-£15 and an oil filter costs around £6. Brake pads sit in the £21 to £50 bracket for a set. Brake discs can be as affordable as around £56. Wiper blades cost in the £7 to £10 bracket. A timing belt costs in the £15 to £32 bracket, while a water pump costs in the £75 bracket

On the Road

The news that this car is based on a Ford Fiesta should certainly set you off in a positive frame of mind when it comes to the drive on offer. The issue though, is one of exactly what would happen to a Fiesta if you gave it a lofty 190mm ride height, a bit of extra weight and a chunky high-riding body. After all, even Ford's chassis engineers aren't miracle workers. In the event, it seems like they're pragmatists. From their point of view, though it would have been nice to have been able to give this car the sweet handling sharpness of a Fiesta or a Focus, that would have entailed ride quality firmer than most typical small Crossover segment buyers would probably want, people with no need and even less desire to throw their cars about. So the EcoSport development team chose instead to put their efforts into ride and refinement. With mixed success. Body roll is quite prevalent and the stiff suspension supposed to restrict it delivers an over-firm ride. Inevitably, the exact level of refinement you get will be heavily influenced by the choice of engine you make. There are actually four options, the least powerful unit of the quartet, the 90PS 1.5-litre TDCi diesel, offering the most pulling power, though even there, we're only talking about a modest 203Nm of grunt, which probably won't be sufficient if you were thinking of doing a bit of serious towing. Here, 62mph is 14s away from rest en route to a maximum of just 99mph. Most EcoSport buyers will want one of the petrol options. Perhaps that'll be the normally aspirated 112PS 1.5-litre variant that manages 62mph in 13.3s on the way to 107mph. This is the only unit you can have with optional 6-speed Powershift automatic transmission, though bear in mind that if get a car fitted with that option, the weight that your EcoSport can potentially tow will fall from 750kg to a mere 400kg. Overall, the best engine option is probably the one most original buyers chose, a 125PS 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol model which manages to be significantly more economical than the base petrol variant whilst still managing to improve upon that car's performance figures - here 62mph from rest occupies only 12.7s on the way to 112mph. If you want to go faster, a 140PS version of this unit was made available in 2015. Either way, there's about 30kgs less weight in the nose with this smaller three cylinder engine fitted, which means that turn-in to corners feels a touch sharper - or at least it would do were there a bit more feel from the electric power steering. Still, as I've already suggested, this car isn't designed for handling heroics. Instead, it'll be at its happiest in an urban jungle you'll be able to tackle from a raised driving position over 150mm higher than that of a Fiesta. The light power steering will help here, as will the slick 5-speed gearbox and a decently tight 10.6m turning circle. In fact, the only real issues arise when the time comes to reverse into a parking space. That's the point when you'll find your rear view somewhat compromised by the huge tailgate-mounted spare wheel - if that's been fitted to the variant you'[re looking at. It tacks another 20cm onto the back of the car and makes the distance to what you're reversing towards that bit trickier to gauge. Rear parking sensors are optional and we'd definitely recommend seeking out a car fitted with them. We should probably finish by talking about off road capability - but then again, perhaps on second thoughts, maybe not: that might just encourage people to go places with this car that possibly they shouldn't. We say 'possibly' because this EcoSport isn't quite as feeble in this regard as you might expect. True, with the original version of this model, you don't get the optional 4WD system that Ford offered on this car in South America or any kind of Peugeot 2008-style Grip Control system to maximise the front end grip you do have. On the other hand though, the 190mm ground clearance figure we mentioned earlier means that this car sits higher of the ground than some RAV4-style soft roading SUVs, which means that in the very unlikely event of an owner fitting it with a proper set of winter tyres, it would probably get you a surprisingly long way. Ford talks bullishly of a 22.1-degree approach angle, a 35-degree departure angle and a wading depth of 550mm.

Overall

If Ford had brought us this car, or something like it, at the turn of the century when it could have done, you can't help thinking that today, our roads would be flooded with the things. As it is, the EcoSport turned out to be a late arrival to an already over-subscribed small Crossover market sector that was - and still is - bursting with alternative talent. Still, a fashionably tardy arrival at any party can always work to your advantage and in developing this model, the Blue Oval brand clearly studied the segment's existing offerings and sought to provide something a little different. You can see that by the way it goes against the grain in this class. Things like the high ride height, the side-opening tailgate and this car's refusal to prioritise 'sporty' handling all mark it out as a different way to go. In truth, all of these things were forced upon this design by the fact that, despite the 'global car' claims, this model was first and foremost developed for a South American market rather than a European one. That doesn't mean that the EcoSport can't work for a used car buyer here though. It's good looking, fashionable and practical. Ride and handling aren't great but it's very well equipped across the board. And the SYNC connectivity AppLink system is just brilliant for a car of this era. In short, we can see why you might like one.

ECO FRIENDLY (new2) 10/06/2016

The EcoSport, Ford's most compact SUV, still has an appeal for the right kind of customer. Jonathan Crouch reports

Ten Second Review

The Ford EcoSport uses tried and tested Fiesta mechanicals to offer buyers a small SUV with added ride height and chunky good looks. Now it's got a trendy 'Active' lifestyle variant too.

Background

Ford didn't rush into bringing us a supermini-based Crossover model. Indeed, the market was awash with the things by the time the brand brought us its own take in this genre, the Fiesta-based EcoSport, in the Spring of 2014. Even so, there were signs that all was not quite right with the product planning. Early buyers questioned the car's refinement, its driving dynamics, its interior and the need to drive around with a huge great spare wheel hanging off the back of the tailgate. Fortunately though, Ford was listening. So, the brand updated the car in both 2015 and 2016, before fundementally changing it in 2018 to create the version we're looking at here. As before, the chunky looks offer up a bit of Amazonian attitude, even if in truth, this car is more Cbeebies than SAS in its take on hostile streetlife. Let's check it out.

Driving Experience

The EcoSport range is now based around Ford's 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol engine, mainly offered in 125PS guise, but also available in 140PS form in the mid-range 'ST-Line' version. You can now only have manual transmission and front wheel drive. The news that an EcoSport is based on a Ford Fiesta should certainly set you off in a positive frame of mind when it comes to the drive on offer. The issue though, is one of exactly what would happen to a Fiesta if you gave it a relatively lofty 190mm ride height, 136kgs of extra weight and a chunky high-riding body. After all, even Ford's chassis engineers aren't miracle workers, something which is fairly evident from the driving experience served up by this car. To be fair, the Blue Oval brand has much improved it, tweaking the springs, dampers and steering of this revised model in order to make it better suit European roads. And there have been some wins as part of that process. The consistent and well-weighted steering for example, is way better than before. Plus the brakes are impressive, the shift change of the 6-speed manual gearbox is slick and highway cruising is pretty refined. Ultimately though, what could be achieved here was rather limited by the high, boxy shape, a big contributing factor to the way the car feels uncomfortable with fast cornering or sudden directional changes at speed. It also rides quite stiffly on its firm suspension. Still, it's nothing you couldn't live with and most likely buyers won't want to drive on their door handles anyway.

Design and Build

The EcoSport's styling at the time of its 2018 facelift was brought more into line with the look of Ford's larger SUVs. A sculpted bonnet with a central bulge delivers a clean front-end appearance and the front-end design is dominated by a smart trapezoidal grille design and distinctive angular headlights that incorporate LED daytime running lights. Angular fog light housings complete a front three quarter profile that was apparently inspired by the straps of a rucksack and was designed to reflect an adventurous character. The EcoSport's rear bumper and tail light designs also deliver a clean, sculpted appearance. Inside, you get an 8-inch SYNC centre-dash infotainment screen which features navigation, 'Apple CarPlay'/'Android Auto' smart-phone mirroring. The rear seat of an EcoSport is a surprisingly pleasant place to be thanks not only to the high, airy roofline but also to the fact that the rear seats are set slightly above those in the front for a better view out. At the back, that side-hinged tailgate still accesses a load space that Ford reckons is big enough to swallow a 560-litre washing machine - once the 60/40 split rear seats are folded, that is.

Market and Model

You can't have a poverty-spec EcoSport any more, so pricing starts a little higher than you might expect - at around £21,000 for the base 'Titanium'-spec version. Another £800 gets you the 'ST-Line' trim most will want with 125PS: it's £400 more for the perkier 140PS version of the 1.0-litre EcoBoost unit. The top 'Active' version costs the same as a 125PS 'ST-Line' model - just under £22,000. You'll spot the 'Active' version of the EcoSport by its 17-inch Y-design dark-inset alloy wheels, black painted roof and rear privacy glass. Or perhaps by its black body kit, which sees that colour applied to the headlamp bezels, the wheel mouldings, the front grille bars and the lower body side claddings. You also get Sport halogen tail lamps. Inside in an 'Active' model, there's partial Sensico upholstery with leather inserts and blue stitching. The thing that rather gives away the reality that this isn't an all-new generation design is the fact that it can't be had with many of the camera-driven safety features you'll find with more recently introduced rivals. So you'll look in vain on the spec sheet for things like autonomous braking and lane departure warning. Some compensation here though, lies in the fact that every EcoSport comes as standard with the potentially life-saving 'Emergency Assistance' set-up that competitors would make you pay extra for. In the event of an accident, this system will automatically call the rescue services to summon assistance anywhere you might be in Europe. It's also worth mentioning that a' Blind Spot Information System' is available at extra cost - one of those set-ups that warns you if, on the move, you're about to dangerously pull out in front of another vehicle.

Cost of Ownership

It's a lot harder to get a boxy Crossover model to return efficient fuel and CO2 returns than it is with a conventional supermini or family hatchback. To illustrate the point, let's look at the WLTP figures of the 125PS 1.0-litre variant most will choose. This returns 47.9mpg on the combined cycle and 136g/km of CO2 - which is some way off the figures the same unit will deliver in a comparable Ford Fiesta - but probably acceptable, given the extra 136kgs of kerb weight this car must cart around. I mention kerb weight: Ford makes a lot of the way that this model's Boron steel construction reduces weight while increasing structural strength. That may be so but the fact still remains that an EcoSport weighs more than virtually all its direct segment rivals. When it comes too booking your EcoSport in for a check-up, you can do this online through the 'My Ford' portal. This is part of the 'Ford BlueService' scheme that wraps up all of the care and maintenance of your car into one bundle that also includes a free 30-point 'eCheck' of vital parts. Here, any work required will be highlighted with red, amber or green traffic light warnings on a report you'll be given that will rank items needing attention in order of their importance. There's also the 'Ford Service App' that you can download to your phone for free. It lets you locate your nearest dealer to make maintenance bookings.

Summary

This EcoSport still has a little life left in it. It won't handle anything like as well as a comparable Puma - or deliver that mild hybrid model's standards of efficiency, but if you don't really care very much about either of those things and you want a small Ford SUV, you'll find plenty to like here. The visual embellishment of the top 'Active' version is well judged. And with any EcoSport, at the wheel, you'll sit higher than you probably would in that alternative 'B'-segment SUV model you've maybe been thinking of. Ultimately, it's been hard for Ford to get round this model's fundamentally South American origins. But in this form, the EcoSport makes more sense than it ever has before. My daughter, for example, would love one. It is, as ever, a case of giving the market what it wants.

Ford EcoSport average rating: 4.5/5 (40 reviews)

Ms K Loughlin - 03/03/20, owner of a Ford EcoSport Titanium Auto

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
Absolutely love my Ford Ecosport, great to drive, good on fuel consumption. What decided it for me on choosing the car was the way the boot opens, with 3 dogs it's so much simpler.

Mr B Irving - 17/03/20, owner of a Ford EcoSport Zetec Turbo

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
Great all round family friendly car. Good spec. A pleasure to drive. Loads of boot space seats are comfortable. Gives loads of information on the dash and screen very easy to use all features. parking sensors are fantastic. Electric folding mirrors would be a great add on. I can't really fault it.

Mrs S Williams - 09/03/20, owner of a Ford EcoSport Titanium

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
Love my new EcoSport. So pleased I made the decision to buy one.

Read all Ford EcoSport Reviews

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