SEAT Arona 1.0 TSI SE Technology 5dr Hatchback (2018) at County Motor Works Vauxhall

01245 932 703

£14,000

WAS £15,500, SAVE £1,500

This fantastic low-mileage Seat Arona is packed with incredible features including Cruise Control, Speed Limiter, Satellite Navigation System, AppleCarPlay/AndroidAuto, Bluetooth Connectivity with Voice Control, DAB Digital Radio, Steering Wheel Mounted Controls, Rear Parking Sensors, Auto-Lights, Front & Rear Fog Lights, Wireless Phone Charging Port, SD Card, USB Port x2, Air Conditioning, Alloy Wheels, Spare Wheel and more. Contact us for full specs and to arrange a test drive.

16/04/2018

9718

Manual

Petrol

RED

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Paul Alexander

Paul Alexander
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open quoteThis Seat Arona is in fantastic condition and comes packed with tech features including SatNav and AppleCarPlay/AndroidAuto.close quote

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Body Glass

Electric front/rear windows with one touch/anti pinch, Rear window wash/wipe

Brakes

ABS+EBA, Electronic stability control, Hill hold control + Tyre Pressure monitor, Multi-Collision braking, Traction control

Chassis/Suspension

Comfort suspension

Driver Aids

Cruise control, Electric speed sensitive power steering, Front assistant collision mitigation, Rear parking sensor

Driver Information

'Lights On' warning buzzer, Outside temperature display, Trip computer

Driving Mirrors

Electric adjustable door mirrors

Embellishment Trims

Interior chrome line trim

Entertainment

6 speakers, Bluetooth interface for hands free and audio streaming, DAB Digital radio, Steering wheel mounted audio controls

Exterior Body Features

Black roof rails, Black window surrounds, Body coloured bumpers, Body coloured door handle inserts, Chrome grille surround

Exterior Lights

Automatic activation of hazard warning lights, Automatic headlights, Electric headlight adjustment, Front fog lights with static cornering function, LED daytime running lights

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Air conditioning, Dust/pollen filter

Interior Features

2 cupholders, Cloth upholstery, Double boot floor, Driver and passenger sunvisors, Height/reach adjustable steering column, Leather handbrake, Leather steering wheel and gear knob

Interior Lights

Ambient interior lighting, Footwell ambient lighting, Front courtesy lights, Front reading light, Illuminated boot

Packs

Connectivity pack plus - Arona

Safety

3 point rear seatbelts x3, Child locks on rear doors, Driver/Front Passenger airbags, Front and rear seatbelt reminder, Front side/curtain airbags, Height adjustable active front headrests, Passenger airbag deactivate switch, Tiredness recognition system

Seats

3 rear height adjustable headrests, 60/40 split folding rear seat, Driver/front passenger seat height adjustment, Isofix attachments on rear seats

Security

2 folding remote keys with window open/close function, Immobiliser, Locking wheel bolts, Remote central locking + deadlocks

Wheels - Alloy

17" Dynamic alloy wheels

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.0
Badge Power: 95
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: TSI
Coin Series: SE Technology
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 8E
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 95
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 80
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 5
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 77
NCAP Safety Assist %: 60
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 111
HC+NOx: N
NOx: 0.032
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 999
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Cylinders: 3
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 74.5
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 76.4
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: DIRECT INJECTION
Gears: 5 SPEED
Number of Valves: 12
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 57.6
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 67.3
EC Urban (mpg): 46.3

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 11.2
Engine Power - BHP: 95
Engine Power - KW: 70
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 5000
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 129
Engine Torque - MKG: 17.8
Engine Torque - NM: 175
Engine Torque - RPM: 2000
Top Speed: 108

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 205/55 R17
Tyre Size Rear: 205/55 R17
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: DYNAMIC
Wheel Type: 17" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1552
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 4138
Wheelbase: 2566
Width: 1780

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 40
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1700
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 400
Max. Loading Weight: 610
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 1100
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 580
Minimum Kerbweight: 1090
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 10.6

CROSS PURPOSES (new2) 23/02/2018

Every volume brand seems to have its own idea of what a small supermini-based SUV should be. Jonathan Crouch takes a look at SEAT's offering, the Arona, in its popular 1.0 TSI petrol guise.

Ten Second Review

SEAT's Arona is a small SUV with an important role to play in the Spanish maker's model line-up. Sophisticated underpinnings make possible a more spacious cabin and a more engaging driving experience than most rivals can offer and across the range, this car has a sense of style that its fashionable clientele should like. Here, we test the volume 1.0-litre TSI petrol version.

Background

As you would expect, the Arona is based on the Barcelona brand's Ibiza supermini, which means that it also shares that car's sophisticated MQB A0 platform - making it the first 'B'-segment Volkswagen Group SUV to get it. That's important because it leaves the Arona lighter than many of its rivals, so potentially more efficient. If this chassis can also play its part in delivering the kind of engaging handling that's endeared the larger Ateca to so many buyers, then this car really will be well set. We'll see. For now, we'll merely tell you that in the arguably more important areas that potential buyers in this segment tend to prioritise - practicality, media connectivity and scope for personalisation - the Arona makes a strong case for itself on paper, especially in this 1.0 TSI guise. But what will the reality of buying and owning one be like? That's what we're here to find out.

Driving Experience

With its only slightly larger Ateca SUV, SEAT has already shown it can produce a compact Crossover with class-leading standards of ride and handling and if you come to this car in search of a slightly smaller Crossover of that kind, you'll find that the Arona continues that strong showing. If you happen to be familiar with rivals in the small SUV segment, you may well notice that the steering here is more direct, the corner turn-in's more precise and that body roll is rather better controlled. Credit for much of this can be given to the stiff, sophisticated MQB A0 platform this model shares with the fifth generation Ibiza supermini it's based upon. That's not to say that it feels in any way really sporty: no car in this segment is. SEAT's preference has been to set the Arona up for the low speed, traffic-jinking needs of the urban jungle and sure enough, it feels right at home in that environment, with its great all-round sight lines and tight turning circle. As for engines, well most will choose the likeable 1.0 TSI turbo petrol variant we tried. As usual, two variants of it are available, most folk likely to stick with the 95PS version which, if you're quick through slick ratios of the 5-speed gearbox, makes 62mph from rest in 11.2s on the way to 107mph. The alternative option is the 115PS unit we tested, which improves those figures to 9.8s and 113mph, gives you a 6-speed manual gearbox and comes with the option of 7-speed DSG auto transmission.

Design and Build

The Arona, says SEAT, 'transcends age barriers'. Not sure about that. The truth is that it's very obviously targeted at the younger folk driving sales in this segment, though there's also enough boxy practicality here to interest more adventurous small families too. These people will see at a glance that the Arona is a more versatile proposition than the Ibiza supermini it's based upon, 79mm longer and 99mm taller than that car. From the side, what would otherwise be a square rather unremarkable profile is enlivened by these two almost arbitrary upper coachwork slashes just below the glass line. And plenty of crossover trinketry - most obviously the contrast-coloured roof. While other makers in this sector have merely dabbled with this concept, SEAT has whole-heatedly embraced it, standardising this feature for those that want it and offering customers orange, black or grey colour options. And inside? Well if you like the funky attitude of the exterior, you might be a little disappointed to find that little of it has been carried over to the cabin, which is virtually identical to the rather conservative interior you get in an Ibiza - though you do sit a little higher. What's not up for debate is the quality of what's provided here, something nicely complemented by the classy glass-fronted 8-inch infotainment screen that most models get. As well as the usual Bluetooth and DAB tuner, this incorporates 3D navigation, voice recognition and SEAT's 'Full Link' smartphone-mirroring system. There's also a decently-sized 400-litre boot.

Market and Model

Arona pricing starts from around £16,000 and runs to just under £25,000 and there are three core trim levels - 'SE', 'FR' and 'XCELLENCE', with variants in each case. We'll get into detail on that in a minute. The engine choice on offer is pretty much the same as you get in an Ibiza and as usual in this segment, is primarily geared towards petrol power. The green pump-fuelled options are mainly 1.0-litre three cylinder units and most buyers will want the 1.0-litre turbo TSI powerplant we tried, offered with either 95 or 115PS, with the faster version gaining a 6-speed manual gearbox. That perkier 1.0-litre TSI derivative is the only variant in the range that can be ordered with an automatic gearbox, a 7-speed DSG transmission that costs an extra £1,300. The other Arona engines on offer will be rarely seen, but both have plenty to be said for them. For petrol people, there's a 1.5-litre TSI EVO unit that has plenty of power - 150PS - and impressive frugality too, thanks to clever cylinder deactivation technology. If efficiency really is a priority though, you'll want the 1.6-litre TDI diesel, offered with either 95 or 115PS. You've really got to be covering a much higher annual mileage than is typical for cars of this kind though, if you're to justify the TDI powerplant's price premium of more than £2,000 over the equivalent 1.0-litre TSI petrol variant.

Cost of Ownership

Of course, like all Crossover SUVs, the Arona is heavier than the conventional hatch it's based upon: in the case of the base 1.0-litre TSI variant, the weight gain over a directly comparable version of the Ibiza supermini is 43kgs. You'd think this wouldn't be enough to drain that frugal little car's fuel and CO2 showing too much and, sure enough, the impact is fairly minimal, the downside over an Ibiza being about 2mpg and 5g/km of CO2. You could cope with that couldn't you? To be specific, both 1.0 TSI Arona models can return up to 57.6mpg on the combined cycle. As for emissions, well the 95PS version delivers 111g/km of CO2 and you'll do no worse than 114g/km in the pokier 115PS variant. Opting for the 1.0 TSI 115PS model with DSG auto transmission has virtually no impact on these figures. Overall, it's difficult to do much better than that in this class. As for the reasons behind this showing, well they're not solely down to questions of weight. There's a lot of very clever engineering on offer here. Take the 1.0-litre TSI engine's particularly efficient variable camshaft adjustment and its optimised thermal management, which significantly reduces emissions in the warm-up phase.

Summary

Overall, the scorecard here is pretty complete. If you like your Crossover cues, you'll find that they're virtually all standard here, rather than being limited to pricier models or being restricted to the options list, as is the case with most rivals. The ride and handling combination is pretty much as good as you're going to get from a car of this kind. And the price premium over an Ibiza is, at least to some extent, justified by the extra versatility and equipment on offer. And in summary? Well we love the fact that the buying public has rejected the collective wisdom of most so-called motoring 'experts' and bought into cars like this one in their droves. People power has produced this kind of product. And if you've been a part of that, we reckon you'll like this end result.

SPANISH TRY (new2) 18/08/2017

SEAT's Arona is a small SUV with an important role to play in the Spanish maker's model line-up. Jonathan Crouch takes a look at what's on offer.

Ten Second Review

The Arona is SEAT's idea of a small sporty SUV and it's likely to find favour with the increasing number of buyers who would once have simply bought another supermini but now feel the need to get themselves something more interesting and lifestyle-orientated. It's good looking, safe, well connected and very personalisable. If this is the kind of car that appeals to you, then an Arona may well tick a lot of boxes.

Background

SEAT's conquest of the SUV segment continues with his Arona. It slots into the Spanish maker's line-up just blow the successful Ateca model, which is based in the running gear of the company's Leon family hatch. The Arona, in contrast, is a supermini-based Crossover, so shares its oily bits with the Barcelona marque's Ibiza supermini. This car was developed as part of the 900 million Euro investment set aside to create the fifth generation Ibiza. It targets a compact crossover segment which has increased four-fold in size since 2015 and claims to bring to the sector the 'sports DNA dynamism' that SEAT hopes characterises its brand.

Driving Experience

As expected, the Arona shares the engine line-up used in SEAT's Ibiza supermini, which means that all of the powerplants on offer have direct injection and a turbo. There are three different petrol units to choose from, the headline emphasis being on the usual Volkswagen Group three-cylinder 95PS 1.0 TSI petrol unit, available in 95PS form with a five-speed manual gearbox or in 115PS guise with either a six-speed 'box or dual-clutch seven-speed DSG auto transmission. The third petrol choice is a 1.5-litre four-cylinder 150PS TSI unit with active cylinder deactivation technology, which is exclusive to the 'FR' trim and is connected to a six-speed manual gearbox. Go for that sporty 'FR' trim and you get dual-mode suspension and the 'SEAT Drive Profile' that allows you to alter the steering, throttle response and suspension feel via four modes: 'Normal', 'Sport', 'Eco' and 'Individual'. As for diesel options, the efficient and reliable 1.6 TDI unit is available with 95 and 115PS. The 95PS version can be paired with a five-speed manual transmission or a seven-speed DSG auto, and the 115PS variant with a six-speed gearbox. All Arona models are front-driven: there's not much appetite in this segment for 4WD.

Design and Build

The Arona's sits on the same hi-tech MQB platform that underpins the latest Ibiza supermini and its styling follows the same structure as that used in the brand's slightly larger Ateca SUV. Here, that model's three-dimensional look is more pronounced, without being too aggressive. Like its rivals, this car is trying to give the feel of being a sturdy car for everyday life for the urban jungle, hence the strong protection in the bumpers, the wheel arches and the dark coloured rubber side skirts, as well as the roof rack and the aluminium look-like protection at the bottom of the bumpers. In terms of its dimensions, the Arona is 4,138mm long, which is 79mm more than an Ibiza. However, the real difference lies in its height, as the Arona is 99mm taller. As a result, this SUV offers not only higher ground clearance for any off-road adventures, but also more front and rear headroom, and, above all, a larger boot, with a 400-litre capacity. Another important feature is the seat cushion, which is 52mm higher and gives a dual advantage. Firstly, a higher driving position for raised view of the road ahead. And secondly, it makes it much easier to get in and out of the car. The passenger seats are also 62mm higher than they would be in an Ibiza, while headroom is 37mm greater in the front and 33mm in the rear. The suspension height has been increased by 15mm and the windscreen is slightly more vertical for a roomier interior.

Market and Model

Arona prices start at around £16,500 but expect most variants to sell in the same kind of £18,000 to £24,000 bracket common to the two leading small SUVs, Nissan's Juke and Renault's Captur. Trim levels are based around the usual 'SE', 'SE Technology', 'FR', 'FR Sport', 'XCELLENCE' and 'XCELLENCE Lux' SEAT spec options. The Spanish brand knows that the extent to which buyers will be able to personalise the Arona and make it their own will be important. Colour-wise, the car is divided into two: the lower body on the one hand, and the roof (plus the A- and C-pillars) on the other. The roof can be grey, black, orange or the same colour as the body. Globally, there are 68 possible colour combinations. Key equipment features available as options or fitted to plusher models include Auto lights and wipers, a Keyless Entry and Start System, a rear camera, an 8-inch black panel centre-dash infotainment touchscreen, a Park Assistance System and a 'Connectivity Hub' which comes with a Wireless Phone Charger and a GSM signal amplifier. Safety spec will also be crucial to sales interest in this car, so the Arona gets all the latest camera-driven tech, including the brand's 'Front Assist' autonomous braking system, 'Blind Spot Detection' (which stops you from pulling out to overtake when there's a vehicle in your blindspot) and 'Rear Traffic Alert' (which warns you of approaching vehicles if you're reversing out from a space). Other features available include Adaptive Cruise Control, Hill Hold control, a Tiredness Recognition System and Multi-Collision Braking.

Cost of Ownership

The headline engine is SEATs well regarded 1.0 TSI petrol turbo unit and it should certainly prove to be very frugal. Expect the 95PS version to manage over 55mpg on the combined cycle and under 110g/km of CO2. Obviously, the 1.6-litre TDI diesel will be much better. Expect about 70mpg and about 105g/km. All models get an automatic stop & start system to cut the engine when you don't need it, stuck in traffic or waiting at the lights. What else? Well there's SEAT's usual three year/60,000 mile warranty. That's unexceptional when rivals like Toyota and Hyundai offer five years of cover as standard and Kia offers up to seven years. However, the SEAT deal is extendable, so you might be able to negotiate on that. And it includes two years of Europe-wide roadside assistance. SEAT dealers also offer an 'It's Fixed!' low cost servicing programme. To even out the cost of regular maintenance, you can take up fixed price servicing packages for up to three scheduled halts and they go with the car when you sell it if the balance has still to be used.

Summary

The Arona, says SEAT, is designed for 'drivers looking for a sense of excitement, distinction and functionality. People who know that age is just a number, not an outlook on life.' In other words, the people who've been busily buying Nissan Jukes and Renault Capturs in considerable numbers over the last five years. The Spanish maker wants in on this lucrative market and this little Crossover looks to have everything necessary to entitle them to a useful slice of sales in this segment. The potential for personalisation will be key to this car's prospects, as will the efficiency made possible by its efficient engines and light, stiff MQB chassis. It's taken some time for the Iberian maker to bring us a Crossover of this kind but we can see quite a few target Arona customers feeling that the wait has been worthwhile.

SMALL - BUT DIFFERENT (family) 06/10/2017

Want a change from just another supermini? June Neary thinks you might just want something like this, SEAT's little Arona SUV.

Will It Suit Me?

Suddenly, it seems like everyone has to have an SUV. Even people who'd previously have bought a humble supermini. In fact, the smallest part of the SUV segment is the fastest growing, started by Nissan's Micra-based Juke and Renault's Clio-based Captur and continued by models like the Ibiza-based SEAT Arona model that I thought we'd look at this week. I'm target market here, so this kind of car ought to appeal.

Practicalities

A few years back, this model would have been an estate variant of SEAT's Ibiza. Now buyers want something more interesting than that - and the Arona does its best to provide it. Under the skin, just about everything that matters is Ibiza-based, but the demeanour here is quite different. Like its rivals, this car is trying to give the feel of being a sturdy car for everyday life for the urban jungle, hence the strong protection in the bumpers, the wheel arches and the dark coloured rubber side skirts, as well as the roof rack and the aluminium look-like protection at the bottom of the bumpers. The Arona's dimensions are a bit different from its supermini stablemate too - it's 79mm longer and 99mm taller. That frees up a bit of extra ground clearance for the mythical off-road adventures that likely buyers will never take. More pertinently, it frees up plenty more front and rear headroom, and, above all, a larger boot, with a 400-litre capacity. Not all 'lifestyle' SUVs of this sort sit you high and commandingly these days, but this one does - which also makes it much easier to get in and out of the car. The passenger seats are also 62mm higher than they would be in an Ibiza, while headroom is 37mm greater in the front and 33mm in the rear. The suspension height has been increased by 15mm and the windscreen is slightly more vertical for a roomier interior. I certainly had no trouble fitting in four passengers and a decently-sized supermarket shop.

Behind the Wheel

And on the move? Well if you can tell the difference between this car and the Ibiza it's based upon, you're obviously a better qualified reviewer than I am. Yes, if you really throw the Arona into a bend at speed, there's a tad more bodyroll than you might normally expect, but to be quite frank, I hardly ever drive like that - and I don't think likely buyers do either. You'll want to know about engines, all of them equipped with direct injection and a turbo, as is the modern way. There are three different petrol units to choose from, the headline emphasis being on the usual Volkswagen Group three-cylinder 95PS 1.0 TSI petrol unit, available in 95PS form with a five-speed manual gearbox or in 115PS guise with either a six-speed 'box or dual-clutch seven-speed DSG auto transmission. The third petrol choice is a 1.5-litre four-cylinder 150PS TSI unit with active cylinder deactivation technology, which is exclusive to the 'FR' trim and is connected to a six-speed manual gearbox. Go for that sporty 'FR' trim and you get dual-mode suspension and the 'SEAT Drive Profile' that allows you to alter the steering, throttle response and suspension feel via four modes: 'Normal', 'Sport', 'Eco' and 'Individual'. As for diesel options, the efficient and reliable 1.6 TDI unit is available with 95 and 115PS. The 95PS version can be paired with a five-speed manual transmission or a seven-speed DSG auto, and the 115PS variant with a six-speed gearbox. All Arona models are front-driven: there's not much appetite in this segment for 4WD. I can see why.

Value For Money

Having done a bit of research here for you, I can report that Arona prices start at around £16,500 but expect most variants to sell in the same kind of £18,000 to £24,000 bracket common to the market's two leading small SUVs, Nissan's Juke and Renault's Captur. Trim levels are based around the usual 'SE', 'SE Technology', 'FR', 'FR Sport', 'XCELLENCE' and 'XCELLENCE Lux' SEAT spec options. Buyers like me like to personalise their cars and, sure enough, the Arona meets that need. Colour-wise, the car is divided into two: the lower body on the one hand, and the roof (plus the A- and C-pillars) on the other. The roof can be grey, black, orange or the same colour as the body. Globally, there are apparently no fewer than 68 possible colour combinations. Is it decently equipped? Well if you spend enough, yes. Key equipment features available as options or fitted to plusher models include Auto lights and wipers, a Keyless Entry and Start System, a rear camera, an 8-inch black panel centre-dash infotainment touchscreen, a Park Assistance System and a 'Connectivity Hub' which comes with a Wireless Phone Charger and a GSM signal amplifier. Safety spec will also be crucial to sales interest in this car, so the Arona gets all the latest camera-driven tech, including the brand's 'Front Assist' autonomous braking system, 'Blind Spot Detection' (which stops you from pulling out to overtake when there's a vehicle in your blindspot) and 'Rear Traffic Alert' (which warns you of approaching vehicles if you're reversing out from a space). Other features available include Adaptive Cruise Control, Hill Hold control, a Tiredness Recognition System and Multi-Collision Braking. And running costs? Well the 1.0 TSI petrol turbo unit most buyers will choose should certainly prove to be very frugal. Expect the 95PS version to manage over 55mpg on the combined cycle and under 110g/km of CO2. Obviously, the 1.6-litre TDI diesel will be much better. Expect about 70mpg and about 105g/km. All models get an automatic stop & start system to cut the engine when you don't need it, stuck in traffic or waiting at the lights.

Could I Live With One?

Certainly. The market's now awash with models like this, but the Arona is one of your more appealing options in this class. Buyers don't seem to mind paying a price premium for a bit of extra style and in return, what's served up here is a small runabout you might really feel quite proud about.

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