Ford Focus 1.0 EcoBoost 125 Titanium 5dr Hatchback (2018) at Ford Ashford

01233 272 332

£18,250

WAS £20,000, SAVE £1,750

Ex - DEMONSTRATOR MODEL - Call to Confirm Mileage - Never lose your way again with the inbuilt Sat Nav, plus our Focus is fitted with Cruise Control, Automatic Headlights, Rain Sensing Wipers, Rear Parking Sensors, Keyless Start, One-Touch Electric Windows, a Heated Windscreen, Dual Zone Climate Control and a DAB Radio with USB in. Qualifies for Warranty4Life*

30/09/2018

2000

Manual

Petrol

Frozen White

New Lower Price



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V5 Document

V5 Document

MOT Certificate

MOT Certificate

Keys

Keys

Manuals

Manuals

Service Log Book

Service Log Book

Body Glass

'Quickclear' heated windscreen/heated washer jets, Automatic rain sensing wipers, Electrically operated front and rear windows with one touch opening and closing, Front variable intermittent wipers with electric wash, Heated rear window, Tailgate wash/wipe

Brakes

ABS+Electronic Brake force Distribution, Auto hold function, Electronic parking brake, Electronic stability control, Hill start assist, Post collision braking

Carpets/Rugs

Front/rear floor mats

Communication

Bluetooth system

Driver Aids

Eco mode, Front and rear parking sensors, Lane keeping aid with lane departure warning, PAS, Pre collision assist with autonomous emergency braking and pedestrian/cyclist detection, Selectable drive mode

Driver Convenience

Easy fuel capless refuelling system

Driver Information

4" TFT coloured cluster screen, Digital clock, Ford pass connect, Ford SYNC 3 nav system with DAB radio, 8" colour touch screen, voice control, app link, Apple car play/Android auto and 4.2" TFT coloured cluster, Trip computer

Driving Mirrors

Auto dimming rear view mirror, Body coloured electrically operated and heated door mirrors with side indicators, Power folding door mirrors with puddle lights

Entertainment

2 USB ports, Aux input

Exterior Body Features

Body colour large rear spoiler, Body coloured bumpers, Body coloured door handles, Polished twin tailpipe, Upper grille with chrome surround and horizontal bars

Exterior Lights

Auto headlamps (on/off), Front fog lamps with cornering function, Halogen reflector headlamps, LED daytime running lamp, LED rear lamps

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Dual zone electronic air temperature control

Interior Features

3 spoke leather trimmed steering wheel with integrated audio controls, Alloy finish pedals, Centre console with sliding front armrest, Cloth upholstery, Leather gear knob, Reach + rake adjustable steering column

Interior Lights

Ambient lighting

Safety

Driver airbag, Front and rear seatbelt reminder, Front inertia reel height adjustable seatbelts with pre-tensioners, Front passenger airbag, Front side airbags, MyKey system, Passenger airbag deactivate switch, Side curtain airbags, Three rear inertia reel lap/diagonal seatbelts, Tyre pressure monitoring system

Seats

60/40 split back and cushion rear seats with 2 height adjustable headrests, Driver's lumbar support, Heated front seats, Height adjustable front headrests, Isofix child seat preparation, Manual passenger seat height and lumbar adjust, Rear centre headrest

Security

Ford keyfree system with Keyless entry and keyless start, Remote central locking & engine immobiliser, Thatcham category 1 alarm

Wheels - Alloy

16" 15 spoke sparkle silver alloy wheels

Wheels - Spare

Mini steel spare wheel

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.0
Badge Power: 125
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: EcoBoost 125
Coin Series: Titanium
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 15E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 1
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 85
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 87
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 5
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 72
NCAP Safety Assist %: 75
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 24
Service Interval Mileage: 18000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 60000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: 120
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: 150000
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 107
HC+NOx: N
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 999
Fuel Delivery: TURBO DIRECT INJECTION
Gears: 6 SPEED
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 58.9
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 68.9
EC Urban (mpg): 47.9

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 10
Engine Power - BHP: 125
Engine Power - KW: 92
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 125
Engine Torque - MKG: 17.3
Engine Torque - NM: 170
Top Speed: 124

Test Cycles

Emissions Test Cycle: NEDC Correlated

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Space Saver?: True
Tyre Size Front: 205/60 R16
Tyre Size Rear: 205/60 R16
Tyre Size Spare: SPACE SAVER
Wheel Style: 15 SPOKE
Wheel Type: 16" ALLOY

Weight and Capacities

No. of Seats: 5

FOCUS GETS A BOOST (new2) 28/09/2018

Much is expected from this fourth generation Ford Focus. Designed from a clean sheet of paper, it looks set to give its rivals plenty to think about. Jonathan Crouch takes a look.

Ten Second Review

The fourth generation Ford Focus puts its maker right back into contention in the family hatchback segment, with smarter looks, much improved interior quality and extra technology. There's also what Ford claims to be class-leading levels of safety. And greater efficiency beneath the bonnet from a completely rejuvenated range of engines, including the 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol unit we look at here, which gains efficient cylinder deactivation technology. The best part though, is that this car still remains as rewarding to drive as it's always been. The Focus might have grown up but it certainly hasn't lost its spark.

Background

This fourth generation Focus is about the same size as before and though this lighter, stronger bodywork may not look too different, it clothes an all-new C2 platform that enables a longer wheelbase that for the first time allows this car to offer properly class-competitive rear seat room and luggage space. Much has changed beneath the bonnet too, with clever cylinder deactivation for petrol models like the 1.0 EcoBoost variants. Also new is the much higher quality cabin which features half the number of previous buttons. On top of all that, the brand claims class-leading camera-driven safety standards too. This car does, in short, promise the kind of significant step forward that'll be absolutely necessary if Ford is to retain its place amongst the sales leaders in this segment. Time to put this car to the test.

Driving Experience

This fourth generation Focus, like its predecessors, has a reputation as a family hatchback with the ability to entertain at the wheel - and if you enjoy your driving, that's something you'll appreciate pretty early on the first time you try one. Twenty years ago, the original version of this model achieved much the same thing by standardising advanced multi-link rear suspension across its model line-up. Today, you only get that on the most powerful 1.5-litre EcoBoost petrol and 2.0-litre EcoBlue diesel variants. If, on the other hand, you go for the 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol engine we tried - as the majority of buyers will - then the damping's a little different. These volume models come with a much less sophisticated torsion beam arrangement, though Ford has embellished it with the clever 'force vectoring' rear axle springs that it first developed for its Fiesta ST hot hatch. As a result, the ride isn't overly firm, but body control through the bends is still exemplary, allowing you at the wheel to make the most of the stiff new C2 platform, the feelsome power steering and the torque vectoring control system that helps you get the power down through the bends. It all combines to create a car that really can still reward at the wheel, even in its most affordable forms: there's still nothing else in this segment that feels quite the same. Yet it still does the sensible stuff well too, being decently refined, with confident braking and a lovely tactile gearshift. Most tend to go for the 1.0-litre unit we tested, offered with either 85, 100 or 125PS. All get a driving modes system which offers three settings - 'Eco', 'Normal' and 'Sport'. The quickest 125PS 1.0-litre powerplant can be ordered with the option of Ford's latest 8-speed auto gearbox, which adapts to your driving style.

Design and Build

Here's a car that's grown up - matured - in almost every way. You might, like us, wish that Ford had been a touch more adventurous about this fourth generation Focus model's design, but you can see at a glance that it better meets the key criteria for the kind of car a family hatchback should be. The wheels are further apart, the glass area's larger, the overhangs shorter, all of this part of the brand's current 'human-centric' design philosophy. To some extent, that works. Put this improved Focus next to its predecessor and it certainly looks a more expensive proposition. Up-front inside, the dashboard has been pulled forward and there's a slimmer, lower centre console, plus that new body shell has freed up more room for shoulders and knees. As a result, you no longer feel quite so hemmed-in at the wheel, but by the same token, there's also slightly less of the cockpit-style positioning that we rather liked before. You can't fault the cleaner, sharper ergonomics though, aided by a massive 50% reduction in button clutter, with as many functions as possible relocated to a prominent SYNC 3 infotainment screen that, in keeping with current automotive fashion, sprouts from the top of the dash. There's now proper rear seat space, thanks to that extended wheelbase. And a properly-sized boot, which can be up to 375-litres in size.

Market and Model

Ford claims to have been a little more realistic with pricing this time round, pointing to a range starting figure which from launch was around £18,000 for the cheapest 1.0-litre EcoBoost version. This powerplant comes in three forms, available with either 85, 100 or, as we tested, 125PS. The variants that most will actually want don't undercut their direct predecessors by all that much, selling in the usual £20,000 to £25,000 bracket. As before, there are two body styles, the usual five-door hatch or, for a model-for-model premium of £1,000, a more versatile estate option. An 8-speed automatic gearbox is an option on 125PS EcoBoost models - for an extra £1,350. Ford claims to have reduced the number of orderable Focus configurations by 92% this time round, but the vast model line-up still takes a bit of getting your head around. Basically, in the mainstream range, there are a couple of budget-minded model lines ('Style' and 'Zetec'), then three luxury-orientated variants ('Titanium', 'Titanium X' and top 'Vignale'), plus a couple of 'Sport' models ('ST-Line' and 'ST-Line X'). There's also an SUV-style 'Active' version with crossover styling cues and a raised ride height.

Cost of Ownership

It's obviously crucial for Ford to get its cost of ownership sums right, hence the changes made to the engineering of this fourth generation Focus that see improvements of up to 10% in fuel efficiency across the range. A key factor in achieving this has been the introduction of cylinder deactivation technology on the three cylinder petrol powerplants that the majority of buyers will probably choose. You might be familiar with this sort of thing from larger engines but if you're not, we'll tell you that at less than 50% throttle and between 1,500 and 4,500rpm, one cylinder is shut off, improving fuel consumption (so Ford says) by as much as 6%. Let's get to the quoted readings for the 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol 100 and 125PS petrol derivatives, all of which we'll quote on the basis of a five-door hatch variant with manual transmission and the smallest wheels available for any given version. Starting with the 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol 100 and 125PS petrol derivatives, which tend to be the most popular in the range. These respectively manage 60.1 and 58.9mpg on the combined cycle and around 108g/km of CO2. The base 85PS version of this engine manages 58.9mpg and 110g/km.

Summary

Even in its most basic form, this Focus remains an entertainer at heart, a car you'll feel at one with thanks to its progressive body control and steering precision. As a result, it's still a default pick amongst family hatchbacks if you like your driving. But not everyone does. Many family hatchback folk are buying a car of this kind simply because it ticks the right boxes for safety, practicality and running costs and I've a suspicion that it's these people who'll have their perceptions most changed by this much improved MK4 model. They may, like us, wonder why it couldn't have been just a touch more visually interesting. And wish for a slightly more classy cabin. But they'll certainly like the responsively frugal new-generation engines, the higher safety standards, the improved quality and the fact that at long last, there's decent rear passenger and luggage space. In short, if you can afford the asking prices, you'll find that here's a family hatchback that now has its priorities right, a car that's grown up, but one that still knows how to enjoy itself. I wonder just how many owners will ever discover that?

SHARPER FOCUS (new2) 01/06/2018

Much is expected from this fourth generation Ford Focus. Designed from a clean sheet of paper, it looks set to give its rivals plenty to think about. Jonathan Crouch takes a look.

Ten Second Review

The Ford Focus has evolved, this MK4 version offering slicker looks, higher interior quality and extra technology. There's also greater efficiency beneath the bonnet thanks to the addition of a hi-tech range of petrol and diesel engines. The best part though, is that this car should still remain as rewarding to drive as it's always been. The Focus might have grown up but it certainly hasn't lost its spark.

Background

It's very difficult to over-state the importance of the Focus family hatch to Ford's European business. To understand its significance, press the rewind button for a moment and shuttle back to 1997. Ford's family hatch contender during this period was the fifth generation Escort, a car so all-encompassingly woeful that the brand was almost embarrassed to sell it. When the time came for a replacement, we all expected something better. What we got in the Focus model first launched in 1998 was something much, much more than that, a car that, at a stroke, offered arguably the biggest step forward in family car design the market has ever seen. Here at last was technology directed firmly at the man in the street who, in this apparently humble family hatchback, could experience a car more entertaining and rewarding to drive than almost anything this side of a sizeable lottery win. It was asking a lot for the MK2 model we saw in 2005 to repeat such a seismic step forward but that second generation Focus was still quite good enough to remain acclaimed as the driver's choice against rival Astras and Golfs that made up for their dynamic failings with a better ride and a more luxurious big car feel. These were attributes the Focus also needed and when it came to developing the MK3 version, launched early in 2011, Ford tried to provide them without compromising the car's class-leading handling. That's also been the goal with this more sophisticated MK4 model, announced in the Spring of 2018.

Driving Experience

Our test of this fourth generation Focus confirmed that the sharp driving dynamics that marked out previous models have been retained. That's aided by the standard inclusion of a driving modes system this time round with settings that can alter steering feel, throttle response and, if you've an auto variant, transmission response times. Talking of autos, there's a new 8-speed self-shifter on offer. Otherwise, you'll be swapping cogs with a 6-speed manual. The engine range initially looks familiar, but closer inspection reveals that it's been heavily revised. As before, the range primarily hinges around Ford's familiar three cylinder 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol unit, which gets a new turbocharger and cylinder head and is available in 85, 100 and 125PS guises. There's also a new 1.5-litre EcoBoost petrol engine with 150 or 182PS. Plus a fresh 1.5-litre EcoBlue diesel with 95 and 120PS. And a 2.0-litre EcoBlue unit with 150PS. As for the suspension, well a little disappointingly, Ford has followed Volkswagen's lead in equipping lower-powered 1.0-litre petrol and 1.5-litre diesel variants with a cruder twist-beam set-up. If you want the more sophisticated independent rear double wishbone suspension system that's supposed to improve ride comfort, you'll need an estate, the 'Active' crossover version, top-spec 'Vignale' trim or a hatch with 1.5-litre petrol or 2.0-litre diesel power. The 'ST-Line' version gets stiffer, lowered suspension.

Design and Build

There's nothing particularly striking about the way this fourth generation Focus looks but the lines are crisp and pleasing, whether you opt for the five-door hatch body style or the alternative small estate. The overall length is 18mm longer than before and the car rides 15mm lower. Or at least it does in standard guise. The SUV-style 'Active' variant has a slightly higher ride height; the sporty 'ST-Line' model rides slightly lower than normal versions. As ever though, what's more important is the stuff you can't see: this Focus rides on the brand's latest 'C2' platform, which enables the wheelbase to be 53mm longer, freeing up extra cabin space. You should certainly feel that inside. Rear knee room has increased by 56mm and, thanks to a re-profiling of the rear doors, the rear passengers' heads are now adjacent to glass rather than metal, so they'll be able to see out more easily. Up-front, as you'd expect, it all feels of much higher quality - the fascia now has half the number of buttons that were there before. And shoulder room is class-leading. The extra body length has freed up more boot space too. In the estate version, there's now a class-leading 1.14m of width between the wheel arches and overall load length with the rear seats folded (1,700mm) is up by 134mm. That means 1,650-litres of carriage capacity.

Market and Model

The Focus range kicks off with the base 'Style' variant priced at around £18,000, before progressing through 'Zetec', 'ST-Line', 'ST-Line X', 'Titanium', 'Titanium X' and 'Vignale' variants. An SUV-style 'Active' version and an 'ST' hot hatch will be along soon. Equipment levels reflect the fact that most customers will be paying upwards of £20,000 for this once very affordable family hatch. Even the Focus 'Style' comes as standard with 16-inch alloy wheels, air conditioning, a DAB digital radio with Bluetooth and Emergency Assist, an electronic parking brake, autonomous emergency braking, tyre pressure monitoring, Hill Start Assist and a Lane-Keeping Aid. If you prioritise luxury and you've a healthy budget, you'll like the top 'Vignale' variant, which gets a unique front grille and body styling with 18in wheels, full LED lighting, leather upholstery, a head-up display, a rear view camera, a heated steering wheel and the 675-watt 10-speaker B&O Play Premium Audio System. For sporty drivers, the 'ST-Line' variant offers unique body styling, including unique upper and lower grille, rear spoiler and polished twin tailpipes. Inside there's a flat-bottomed steering wheel, black headlining, an aluminium gear knob, alloy finish pedals and red stitching. Sophisticated features available across the range include a head-up display, radar-operated cruise control, a more advanced Park Assist system and a wi-fi network that will connect up to 10 devices.

Cost of Ownership

Ford has re-fettled its engines in pursuit of greater efficiency. The 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol unit gets a higher compression ratio and increased injection pressure to facilitate this. It'll also help that this MK4 model Focus can be up to 88kg lighter than its predecessor. Around 33kgs of that comes from the new C2 platform, which uses a higher proportion of high-strength steel. A further 17kg of weight has been taken out of the interior, the powertrain is around 6kgs lighter and the electrical system loses 7kgs of weight too. A standard 'Active Grille Shutter' closes a flap in the front gill to reduce drag at speed. Plus there's clever 'Air Curtain' technology that guides airflow across the front wheels in a way that reduces turbulence. The result of all this effort is, according to Ford, a 10% improvement in running cost efficiency across the board. Specifically, on the volume 1.0-litre EcoBoost petrol models, that means a CO2 emissions figure which can be as low as 108g/km, regardless of your choice between 85, 100 or 125PS versions of this powerplant. The 1.5-litre EcoBoost petrol unit can put out as little as 122g/km. As for the 1.5-litre EcoBlue diesel, well in 95PS form, this unit produces 94g/km of CO2. Choose the 2.0-litre EcoBlue diesel unit and the CO2 figure is 110g/km.

Summary

Has any car had more of an impact on modern era motoring than the Ford Focus? With over 16 million global sales on the board, it's hard to argue the point. Other manufacturers can better this car in some regards, but they still can't make their family hatchback contenders drive like a Focus. True, this car is still far from perfect. There are cheaper rivals - and there are certainly more spacious ones. As an overall package though, it remains hard to beat. This car no longer depends solely on handling supremacy to justify its position at the top of the sales charts. Smarter and more sensible, it is, more than ever, number one for a reason.

Ford Focus average rating: 4.5/5 (75 reviews)

- 09/01/2019, owner of a Ford Focus ST-3 Tdci

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
Great experience and great car!

- 15/01/2019, owner of a Ford Focus 5 Door Titanium 1.0L EcoBoost 125PS 6 Spd

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
For a 1000cc it feels very sporty. Would recommend this vehicle.

- 20/12/2018, owner of a Ford Focus 5dr ST-Line 1.0T EcoBoost 140PS 6 Speed

User rating: 4.5/5

User comment:
I love my new Ford Focus - very economical, comfortable and quick on the acceleration.

Read all Ford Focus Reviews

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