Mini Countryman 1.6 Cooper S 5dr CHILI PACK Hatchback (2016) at Bolton Motor Park Abarth, Fiat and Mazda

01204 910 361

£14,000

WAS £16,500, SAVE £2,500

Fitted with 6 Speed Manual Gear Box, CD/Radio, Bluetooth Phone connection, Auto Lights, Electric Windows, Cruise Control, Alloy Wheels, Cup Holders in the centre.

28/12/2016

18600

Manual

Petrol 45.6 combined MPG

WHITE

New Lower Price


We pride ourselves in only providing cars of the highest of standards - all vehicles are taken through a pre-delivery inspection and are fully HPI checked for your peace of mind. We price our vehicles for sale on the basis of age, condition and mileage. The vehicles for sale may have previously been used for business or hire purposes and so may have had multiple users. Where we hold documents relating to vehicle history, these are available for inspection on request and we are happy to address any specific queries before you view or make an offer to purchase any vehicle.


Customer Views 0

Location: Bolton Motor Park Abarth, Fiat and Mazda - Stock At This Dealer

Get Directions

MD66FAU


All vehicles can be purchased from your local Motorparks dealer regardless of their physical stock location.

Best part-ex price paid
Ready to test drive
Finance Available
Qualifies for Warranty4life

Warranty 4 Life

Email Me Details Email Similar
Get Your Sale Price

Our Lowest Price Within 3 Minutes.

Finance My Car Reserve Now

£200 off GardX paint protection with the purchase of any vehicle! Was £499 now just £299.

£200 off GardX Vehicle Protection Vehicle Enquiry Value My Car Call Me Back Test Drive Make a Bid Save CarRemove Car
Can I Get Credit?
Barry Linnell

Barry Linnell
Business Manager

Manager's Comment

open quoteAsk about our unique Warranty4Life with comprehensive AA cover on qualifying vehicles subject to terms and conditions.close quote

Can I Get Credit?

CO2: 144 g/km

MPG: 45.6

Fitted with 6 Speed Manual Gear Box, CD/Radio, Bluetooth Phone connection, Auto Lights, Electric Windows, Cruise Control, Alloy Wheels, Cup Holders in the centre, and more.

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.6
Badge Power: 190
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: 190
Coin Series: Cooper S [Chili]
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 23E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 84
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 83
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 5
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 63
NCAP Safety Assist %: 71
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 36
Service Interval Mileage: 30000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 999999
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: N
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: N
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 144
HC+NOx: N
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1598
Compression Ratio: 11.0:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 77
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 85.8
Engine Code: N18B16M0
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: TURBO INJECTION
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 45.6
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 53.3
EC Urban (mpg): 36.7

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 7.5
Engine Power - BHP: 190
Engine Power - KW: 140
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 5500
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 192
Engine Torque - MKG: 26.5
Engine Torque - NM: 240
Engine Torque - RPM: 1600
Top Speed: 135

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 225/45 R18
Tyre Size Rear: 225/45 R18
Tyre Size Spare: RUN FLAT TYRES
Wheel Style: Turbo fan
Wheel Type: 18" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1544
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 4109
Wheelbase: 2595
Width: 1789

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 47
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1820
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1170
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 350
Max. Loading Weight: 510
Max. Roof Load: 75
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 750
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 500
Minimum Kerbweight: 1310
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 11.6

NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (new2) 04/11/2016

The Countryman was the first five-door, family-sized MINI. This bigger second generation version gives that recipe a more sophisticated spin. Jonathan Crouch reports

Ten Second Review

The second generation MINI Countryman is the biggest and most versatile model to be launched in the brand's 57-year history. With its larger external dimensions and increases in space throughout the cabin and luggage area, it offers a more credible premium alternative to Qashqai-sized family Crossover segment rivals. There's a bit of interior innovation - and the option of Plug-in hybrid tech too.

Background

Back in the late Sixties, Sir Alec Issigonis, designer of the original British Mini, was faced with a rather difficult task. His little city runabout was a huge success, driven and loved by everyone from Peter Sellers to the Beatles, but beyond it, there was little for family owners to move on to. What was needed was a five-door, four-metre-long sister model that still kept much of the Mini's cleverness. And the result was the Austin Maxi. Forty years on in 2010, BMW were faced with a similar issue. Their new MINI was a hit but it couldn't offer five proper doors or decent space for rear passengers or luggage. That time round, the issue was solved by the first generation version of the car we look at here, the MINI Countryman. That model did well for MINI, but it was never quite large enough to properly compete with family-sized Crossover models in the Qashqai class. Nor was it quite sophisticated enough to tempt users of premium-badged compact Crossovers, cars like Audi's Q3 and Mercedes' GLA. This larger, cleverer second generation Countryman addresses both these issues.

Driving Experience

The new MINI Countryman is available at launch with a choice of five new engines: two diesels and three petrol-powered variants, all of them featuring MINI's TwinPower turbo technology. Most will want one of the 2.0-litre diesels - there's a 150bhp unit in the Cooper D or a 190bhp powerplant in the Cooper SD that puts out 400Nm of toque, providing for a 0-62mph sprint of just 7.7 seconds. The petrol line-up starts with the 136bhp 1.5-litre three-cylinder unit used in the Cooper Countryman. The alternative is the 192bhp 2.0-litre powerplant you'll find in the pokey Cooper S, a variant able to complete the sprint to 62mph from rest in just 7.5 seconds. Steptronic auto transmission with paddleshifters is optional across the range. Another option across the line-up is an improved version of MINI's 'ALL4' all-wheel drive system. This set-up now reacts more quickly and precisely to changing situations. The most interesting engine option though, is the Plug-in hybrid set-up used in the priciest variant, the 'Cooper S E ALL4' model. Here, the 1.5-litre 136bhp Cooper engine is mated with an 88bhp electric motor and the whole package is combined with Steptronic auto transmission and 'ALL4' 4WD.

Design and Build

The problem with the original Countryman was that in size, it sat rather awkwardly between the compact 'Juke'-shaped part of the compact Crossover segment and the larger 'Qashqai'-shaped family section of this class. With this larger MK2 model, the target market for this car can be much more clearly defined and high-ish pricing can much more easily be justified. It's 20cms longer than before with 7.5cms of extra wheelbase length, enlarged dimensions that make it the largest MINI ever made. You certainly feel that inside, where both driver and front passenger benefit from extended head and shoulder space. The second row of seating now contains three fully-fledged seats, and the rear door openings have been enlarged, enabling easier entry and exit. In addition to overall interior width, leg space is now significantly more generous too, with an extra five centimetres of knee room over the previous model. The rear seats can be shifted back and forth by up to 13cm, prioritising either passenger legroom or boot capacity depending on the situation. The folding rear backrest offers a 40:20:40 split and also provides a variable tilt angle so as to also offer either increased seating comfort or additional storage space for the bigger 450-litre boot at the rear.

Market and Model

Prices have risen significantly: it's no longer possible to buy any sort of Countryman for well under £20,000. Still, given that this car is now large enough to compete in a larger section of the Crossover market, you could argue that this is fully justified. The asking figures start at around £22,500 for the least expensive Cooper model and rise to around £30,000 for the car in Cooper SD ALL4 guise. Throughout the range, there's the option of finding around £1,500 more for Steptronic automatic transmission. The 'Cooper S E Countryman ALL4' plug-in hybrid model is priced from around £31,500. Reflecting customer demand for high-end features, equipment levels on this MK2 model have been increased. All variants get a Navigation System, Bluetooth, Cruise Control an Emergency E-call set-up and 'Active Guard' autonomous braking. Naturally, being a MINI, there's broad scope for personalisation, with extensive colour and trim options and advanced technology including a new 8.8" inch touchscreen display as part of the MINI Navigation System XL. The luggage area can be accessed via an optional electric tailgate that can be opened with a wave of your foot beneath the bumper. One unique option is the Picnic Bench - a flexible surface that folds out of the luggage compartment and provides seating for two people.

Cost of Ownership

The Countryman has certainly cleaned up its act. The 2.0-litre diesel unit most will choose returns 64.2mpg on the combined cycle and 113g/km in 'Cooper D' guise - or 61.4mpg and 121g/km on 'Cooper SD' form. Petrol people get a 1.5-litre motor in the 'Cooper' that returns 51.4mpg and 126g/km. Or a 2.0-litre unit in the 'Cooper S' that manages 45.6mpg and 141g/km. The efficiency headline with this MK2 model range is the addition of MINI's first Plug-in hybrid engine, a unit you'll find in the 'Cooper S E Countryman ALL4' variant. Here, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are very low, with 134.5mpg and 49g/km claimed respectively. Plus this model can travel up to 25 miles on electric power alone. Via a wallbox, the 7.6kWh battery can be recharged in two and a quarter hours: use a regular household socket and it'll take an hour longer. As you drive, there's an 'eDrive' toggle switch that gives you three operating modes. In 'Auto', the car will run on electric power alone at speeds of up to 50mph or in 'MAX' at up to 78mph. Finally, there's a 'SAVE Battery' option that allows you to 'freeze' your all-electric charge capability so you can activate it later in your trip - say in urban driving you'll reach at the end of a long motorway haul.

Summary

The Countryman is a MINI - but not as many will know it. But then if it was, this Countryman wouldn't be able to continually keep existing MINI people loyal when they out-grew their city runabouts and shopping rockets. Nor would 80% of its sales tempt in buyers new to the brand. Customers liking the vibrant SUV-inspired Crossover concept, but wanting it with a little more tarmac sparkle. This larger, more sophisticated second generation Countryman model has achieved both these things, though arguably at the cost of British style and charisma. Still, now cleaner under the bonnet and smarter inside and out, it's as suited to the urban jungle as a Land Rover is to the Amazon, a car created for the times we live in. And a Country you could be proud of.

COUNTRYFILE (used) 27/01/2017

By Jonathan Crouch

Introduction

With decent room for four and a good boot, the first generation MINI Countryman opened the possibility of MINI ownership up to buyers who found the smaller models in the range too impractical. It especially targeted buyers thinking of Qashqai-class SUV-style Crossover models, bringing them more performance, sharper handling and all the cute retro design cues that have underpinned this brand's success. Let's check this model out as a used car buy.

Models

5dr SUV (1.6 petrol/2.0 diesel [One/ Cooper / Cooper S/ Cooper SD/ JCW])

History

Back in the late Sixties, Sir Alec Issigonis, designer of the original British Mini, was faced with a rather difficult task. His little city runabout was a huge success, driven and loved by everyone from Peter Sellers to the Beatles, but beyond it, there was little for family owners to move on to. What was needed was a five-door, four-metre-long sister model that still kept much of the Mini's cleverness. And the result was the Austin Maxi. Forty years on, BMW, by then the owner of the MINI marque, found itself faced with a similar issue. Their new turn of the century MINI Hatch was a hit but it couldn't offer five proper doors or decent space for rear passengers or luggage. Hence the need for this model, a MINI that could - the Countryman. At the time of the original version's 2010 launch, never had anything badged 'MINI' ventured to such a size - or boasted anything like this car's level of five-door practicality. Fully 37cms longer, 10cm wider and 15cm taller than a standard three-door version, this was easily the biggest model the brand had ever built. Its name is borrowed from the old Austin designation for estate cars in times past, models with quaint wood adornment on their rear ends. But this was no Countryman for old men, appealing instead to the youthful, vibrant Crossover market, full of Qashqai-class cars that mixed design ideas from ordinary family hatchbacks and 4x4s to produce practical on-road transport with a dash of off-road ruggedness thrown in. The MK1 model Countryman was mildly updated in 2015, then replaced early in 2017 by a larger second generation version.

What You Get

Anyone still clinging to vestiges of Britishness in the modernday MINI brand will be a little discomforted by this Countryman. The minimal design cues shared between current-day hatch and the Issigonis original are forgotten here. Unlike other modern MINIs, it was never even built in Blighty, though potential owners will be cheered by the news that early versions rolled along Austrian production lines alongside £150,000 Aston Martin Rapides. Which is not to say that brand identity has been lost. Quite the opposite in fact. Look around and all the usual MINI traits are very much in evidence, from the foursquare stance with wheels pushed right out to the extremities to the unmistakable font end with its rounded headlamps. Everything was scaled up for this larger five-door car though and back in 2010 at this model's original launch, the wheelbase and the overall height of this car was far in excess of anything that this marque had tried before. And it's the same inside, where a stretched floorplan means that at last in this model, a MINI could offer you two proper rear doors and a back seat that two fully-sized adults could get comfortable in. Many buyers were satisfied with two individual rear seats in this car, but for original purchasers, there was also the option of a rear bench, theoretically big enough for three (provided that the middle occupant is a fairly small child). That does mean however, doing without the full extent of a novel centre rail system onto which all manner of (mostly optional) items can be clipped. Most Countryman models you'll find will have cupholders and a sunglasses-holder attached to it, but buyers who made free with the options list could clip on everything from iPhone chargers to dog bowls. The rear seats can recline for greater comfort on longer journeys and slide backwards and forwards so that you can have a large boot or plenty of legroom. Sadly, there's not quite enough space for you to have both at the same time. Still, the VW Golf-rivalling 350-450-litres you do get is double that of an ordinary MINI from this MK1 model Countryman's era, even if the seats-folded total of 1170-litres isn't especially class-competitive. There's a bit of a step up in the boot floor with the seats down too. Up-front, all the expected MINI design cues are present and correct. With the exception of the rather awkward-to-use aircraft-style handbrake, owners familiar with the brand's smaller models will feel right at home. There's the usual over-sized speedometer, here with an optional high definition colour screen at its centre that displays the clever MINI Connected system, capable of replicating everything on your iPhone for easy reference as you drive. Plus the usual (and initially slightly confusing) chromed controls for windows, air conditioning and locking, are all clustered together. What To Look For

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

Generally, the MINI Countryman owners we came across in our buyers' survey were pretty satisfied but inevitably, we did come across a few issues. There are various reports of dashboard creaks over bumps, so look out for that on your testdrive, along with the annoying buzzing sound from the doors that one owner we found had to endure. There have been reports of heavy clutch wear on 'ALL4' 4WD models, though that's not such an issue on post-2012 models, which had a more durable clutch assembly. The outside chrome trim apparently has a tendency to peel on the belt line and there have been reports of surface rust taking hold on some components, specifically the water pump and the wheel nuts. Plus corrosion has been reported on the optional two-tone alloy wheels. Finally, we came across a couple of owners who reported that the interior reading lights had a mind of their own, switching on when the car was locked.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a 2012 MINI Countryman Cooper D 112bhp excl. VAT) Brake pads are between £30-£45 for cheap brands and up to £65 if you want an expensive make. Brake discs start in the £40 to £70 bracket, but you can pay in the £80 to £110 bracket for pricier brands. Brake callipers sell at around £100. A drive belt is around £12-£15. Air filters sit in the £16-£20 bracket. Oil filters cost between £10 and £22 depending on brand. A wiper blade set is around £4-£15, while a thermostat would be around £35 to £45, though a pricier brand item could cost you up to £85. A timing chain would cost around £28-£55, though a pricier brand item could cost up to £217. A radiator would set you back about £245, while a fuel filter would cost in the £25 to £40 bracket.

On the Road

This car's price and size suggest it to be a more grown-up thing than any ordinary MINI, safer, more spacious and able to cover longer distances. But as any teenager will tell you, being grown-up can also mean being boring. So does driving a Countryman feel like driving a MINI? First impressions are that it does. You get remarkably quick steering which immediately gives the car a keener feeling than you'd get in the kind of rival Golf-sized hatch or Crossover model you could buy for similar money. A good start then, though once you throw the car hard into a corner, it is immediately obvious that you're driving something quite different from the MINIs we know and love. This model's Crossover class pretentions see it riding 10mm higher than the brand's ordinary three-door model and it's nearly 300kgs heavier, statistics that have to tell somewhere. But even so, this manages to be one of the best driver's choices in this segment, not a class noted for dynamic prowess. Few other small Crossovers would dare come equipped with as much as 184bhp, the output offered in the pokey 1.6-litre petrol Cooper S version which can sprint to sixty in as little as 7.6s on the way to 134mph. This variant, along with the mainstream diesel option, a 112bhp BMW-sourced 1.6, can be had with either front wheel drive or MNI's 'ALL4' 4WD system. This is one of those smart systems able to automatically vary the power distribution between the front and rear axles according to the grip available. Usually, the torque will be split 50/50 front-to-rear, but should conditions get slippery, up to 100% of the power will be automatically directly towards the most appropriate axle. No fiddly knobs or buttons to press: the car will decide what to do and how to do it all on its own. This is no offroader of course, this Country being one designed for snowy pavements, slippery grass and that bit of extra peace of mind on an icy February morning - exactly as many potential buyers will want. The rest of the time, it'll be the fun family runabout you bought it to be in the first place, compensating for its extra bulk with ride quality that's far better than an ordinary MINI, if not quite as good as some rivals, and a slick-shifting 6-speed gearbox that's standard if you don't need the optional Steptronic 6-speed auto. Most Countryman owners of course, won't want to have to afford niceties like powerful engines, auto gearboxes and 4WD. And for them, BMW provided another batch of 1.6s, an entry-level 98bhp petrol unit, also available to Cooper buyers with 122bhp, plus an 90bhp diesel. Don't expect any performance fireworks from these, but most will feel a rest to sixty time of between 12 to 13s on the way to a maximum of around 107mph is quite as fast as they will want to go in a car of this kind.

Overall

Here is a MINI - but not as you might know it. But then, if it was conventionally sized, this Countryman wouldn't be able to keep existing MINI people loyal when they out-grew their city runabouts and shopping rockets. Nor would it tempt in buyers new to the brand. Customers liking the vibrant SUV-inspired Crossover concept, but wanting it with a little more tarmac sparkle. This Countryman has done both these things, though at the cost of British style and build. It's as suited to the urban jungle as a Land Rover is to the Amazon. It's a car created for the times we live in. And a Country you could be proud of.

A WEEK IN THE COUNTRY (family) 15/02/2010

Introduction

June Neary spends some time with a more versatile MINI, the Countryman

Will It Suit Me?

I've always like the thought of owning a MINI but space has always defeated me. MINIs are cute - but just not big enough. Even the Clubman estate, innovative though it is, wasn't quite what I was looking for. But here's a MINI model that may be - the Countryman. The first generation Countryman was the largest MINI to date at its original launch back in 2010 and this MK2 model is larger still, offering extra potential for this cheeky brand to capitalise on the well documented loyalty of its customers. This model provides somewhere to go for those with commitments who, like me, have outgrown a very compact car.

Practicalities

Like all MINIs, this one looks unique, displaying all of the brand's usual traits, from the foursquare stance with the wheels pushed right out to the extremities of the vehicle to the unmistakable font end with its rounded headlamps. Everything is scaled up for this larger five-door car though, with the wheelbase and the overall height far in excess of anything that has gone before. I liked it. MINI's usual high beltline looks even higher on the Countryman and there's a hatchbacked rear end giving access to a bigger 450-litre boot. That's easily enough for pushchairs and the like. The second row of seating now contains three fully-fledged seats and the rear door openings have been enlarged, enabling easier entry and exit. In addition to overall interior width, leg space is now significantly more generous too, with an extra five centimetres of knee room over the previous model. The rear seats can be shifted back and forth by up to 13cm, prioritising either passenger legroom or boot capacity depending on the situation.

Behind the Wheel

If you like the driving experience of the standard third generation MINI models, then you'll like the feel of a Countryman since the recipe very much the same. There are five new engines this time round: two diesels and three petrol-powered variants, all of them featuring MINI's TwinPower turbo technology. Most will want one of the 2.0-litre diesels - there's a 150bhp unit in the Cooper D or a 190bhp powerplant in the Cooper SD that puts out 400Nm of toque, providing for a 0-62mph sprint of just 7.7 seconds. The petrol line-up starts with the 136bhp 1.5-litre three-cylinder unit used in the Cooper Countryman. The alternative is the 192bhp 2.0-litre powerplant you'll find in the pokey Cooper S, a variant able to complete the sprint to 62mph from rest in just 7.5 seconds. Steptronic auto transmission with paddleshifters is optional across the range. Another option across the line-up is an improved version of MINI's 'ALL4' all-wheel drive system. This set-up now reacts more quickly and precisely to changing situations. In my opinion, the most interesting engine option though, is the Plug-in hybrid set-up used in the priciest variant, the 'Cooper S E ALL4' model. Here, the 1.5-litre 136bhp Cooper engine is mated with an 88bhp electric motor and the whole package is combined with Steptronic auto transmission and 'ALL4' 4WD. That optional 'ALL4' 4WD system I mentioned is worth having I think, if you're to comfortably get the kids to school in a snowy snap. It's an advanced set-up with an electro-hydraulic differential to vary the power distribution between the front and rear axles according to the detected levels of grip. Under normal conditions, 50% of the engine's output is sent to the rear but as grip is lost, up to 100% of drive can go in that direction. This should add a further dimension to the MINI's acclaimed on-road handling. And it does. Throw the car hard into a corner, and it becomes clear that you're driving something quite different from the MINIs we know and love. It rides higher than the brand's ordinary three-door model and of course, it's much heavier, statistics that have to tell somewhere. But it's one of the better driver's choices in a segment not noted for setting any standards in dynamic prowess.

Value For Money

With prices starting at over the £22,500 mark, it isn't cheap for its size - but it is decently equipped. Reflecting customer demand for high-end features, equipment levels on this MK2 model have been increased. All variants get a Navigation System, Bluetooth, Cruise Control an Emergency E-call set-up and 'Active Guard' autonomous braking. Naturally, being a MINI, there's broad scope for personalisation, with extensive colour and trim options and advanced technology including a new 8.8" inch touchscreen display as part of the MINI Navigation System XL. The luggage area can be accessed via an optional electric tailgate that can be opened with a wave of your foot beneath the bumper. One unique option is the Picnic Bench - a flexible surface that folds out of the luggage compartment and provides seating for two people. Throughout the range, there's the option of finding around £1,500 more for Steptronic automatic transmission. As is the norm elsewhere in the MINI line-up, the Cooper S and JCW cars have a lot more visual aggression about them with a redesigned front grille and more shapely bumpers. Safety-wise, all cars get front, side and curtain airbags along with three-point seatbelts for all occupants.

Could I Live With One?

This was the first MINI that I felt I could really live with, family commitments and all. Yet it isn't boringly practical, the whole reason why MINIs appeal to me in the first place. The Countryman then, is a car that will continue to bring new customers to the brand: they might even include me.

Can I Get Credit?