Fiat 500 1.2 Pop 3dr Hatchback (2016) at Bolton Motor Park Abarth, Fiat and Mazda

01204 910 361

£6,500

WAS £8,000, SAVE £1,500

Features include Facelift design, Multi-function steering wheel, USB/3.5mm/12v Inputs, Dual-drive PAS, Electric front windows, Electric/Heated door mirrors, Rear Isofix, Colour coordinated interior, Remote central locking, Daytime running lights, ABS with EBD, Body colour coded bumpers and much more.

31/03/2016

23218

Manual

Petrol 60.1 combined MPG

CORAL

New Lower Price



Customer Views 0

Location: Bolton Motor Park Abarth, Fiat and Mazda - Stock At This Dealer

Get Directions

MJ16BXE


All vehicles can be purchased from your local Motorparks dealer regardless of their physical stock location.

Best part-ex price paid
Ready to test drive
Low Finance Available
Qualifies for Warranty4life

Warranty 4 Life

Email Me Details Email Similar
Get your sale price

Our Lowest Price Within 3 Minutes.

Finance My Car Reserve Now £100 Voucher Vehicle Enquiry Value My Car Call Me Back Test Drive Make a Bid Save CarRemove Car
Can I Get Credit?
Daryl Atherton

Daryl Atherton
Business Manager

Manager's Comment

open quoteNew Shape Fiat 500 with only £20 year road tax and great features.close quote

Can I Get Credit?

CO2: 110 g/km

MPG: 60.1

Features include Facelift design, Multi-function steering wheel, USB/3.5mm/12v Inputs, Dual-drive PAS, Electric front windows, Electric/Heated door mirrors, Rear Isofix, Colour coordinated interior, Remote central locking, Daytime running lights, ABS with EBD, Body colour coded bumpers and much more.

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.2
Badge Power: 69
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: N
Coin Series: Pop
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 7U
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 8
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 66
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 49
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 3
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 53
NCAP Safety Assist %: 27
Service Interval Frequency - Months: N
Service Interval Mileage: 18000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 999999
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: N
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: N
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 124
HC+NOx: N
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: SOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1242
Compression Ratio: 11.1:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 70.8
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 78.9
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: MULTI POINT FUEL INJECTION
Gears: 5 SPEED
Number of Valves: 8
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 53.3
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 61.4
EC Urban (mpg): 42.8

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 12.9
Engine Power - BHP: 69
Engine Power - KW: 51
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 5500
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 75
Engine Torque - MKG: 10.4
Engine Torque - NM: 102
Engine Torque - RPM: 3000
Top Speed: 101

Test Cycles

Emissions Test Cycle: NEDC Correlated

Tyres

Tyre Size Front: 175/65 R14
Tyre Size Rear: 175/65 R14
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: N
Wheel Type: 14" STEEL

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1488
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 3571
Wheelbase: 2300
Width: 1627
Width (including mirrors): 1893

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 35
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1345
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 474
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 185
Max. Loading Weight: 365
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 800
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 400
Minimum Kerbweight: 980
No. of Seats: 4
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 9.3

LESS IS MORE (new2) 28/04/2017

Fiat's rejuvenated little 500 arguably makes most sense in the 1.2-litre 69bhp entry-level guise that most customers choose. Jonathan Crouch drives it.

Ten Second Review

Fiat's cheeky little 500 is a stylish citycar that remains as appealing as ever in this much improved guise. It's not been fundamentally changed - but then loyal buyers didn't really want it to be. These people tend to go for the base 1.2-litre version we look at here and will like the smarter look, the extra media options and the more individual feel. You can tell that Fiat knows its market.

Background

If ever a car has built its brand, it's this one, Fiat's 500. In fact, it's done so twice. First at its original launch back in 1957. And more recently with this modern era version, first launched in 2007 and significantly improved in mid-2015 to create the refreshed version we're going to look at here. In recent times, this Fiat has faced tougher competition, not only from the MK3 version of the MINI Hatch but also from other style-orientated small cars like the Vauxhall ADAM, the Citroen-derived DS3 and new generation versions of smart's fortwo and forfour models. Hence the thorough update that's created the revised version we're going to look at here. The look hasn't changed much - why would it? That's the main reason why over 1.5 million people have bought themselves this car. Minor tweaks though, have brought the styling into line with other larger models in the wider 500 range, plus there's a little more efficiency, more scope for personalisation and wider availability of the Fiat Group's Uconnect infotainment technology. Will it all be enough? Let's find out at the wheel of the volume 1.2-litre model.

Driving Experience

And on the move? Well the Italian brand has enhanced refinement and improved the braking performance of this revised model but in truth, the dynamic feel of this car won't be a very important consideration for most potential buyers. They'll be more interested in the super-tight 9.3m turning circle and the way you can twirl this car into the tightest parking space thanks to the super-light 'City' steering feature. These people will often be urban-based - hence the relatively high take-up for the clutchless 'Dualogic' transmission option. And over 80% of them tend to opt for the powerplant we tried, the 69bhp 1.2-litre petrol unit. There are other engine options - a 1.3-litre MultiJet diesel and the 1.4-litre T-Jet turbo petrol unit used in the hot hatch 'Abarth' models for example - but if you really don't want the rather feeble petrol 1.2, then the powerplant your dealer will probably point you towards is the clever 0.9-litre two cylinder TwinAir petrol unit, offered in either 85bhp or 105bhp guises. This delivers a lovely putter-putter thrum that seems to be exactly the kind of thing you'd have heard from the 1957 original nipping through the back streets of Naples. More importantly, in a TwinAir 500 model you'll be getting around 50% more pulling power than you would be in this 1.2-litre variant, yet this is mated to the potential for quite outstanding frugality.

Design and Build

We'd understand if you concluded that this 'new' Fiat 500 looks pretty much the same as the old one. Nevertheless, Fiat insists that no fewer than 1,800 changes have been made in improving it. None of these have altered the dinky external dimensions, so at just 3.5m long, 1.6m wide and 1.5m high, this Fiat can still fit into spaces that even a MINI would have to avoid. If you choose the 500C variant rather than the fixed-top model that we tried, you get what amounts to a full-length canvas sunroof which electrically retracts into a concertinaed bundle just above the boot. Most of the exterior styling tweaks that have been made can be found at the front. The main round headlights adopt clever polyellptical modules for improved night time vision and integrate dipped-beam headlamps and turn signals. Inside, delicious details are everywhere, the coloured fascia panels featuring iconic '500' badging and colour-matched against the bodywork. As for the key change to this improved model, well on a plush variant like our 'Lounge'-spec test car, that's very obvious, the 5-inch 'Uconnect LIVE' infotainment display screen mounted high on the dashboard, right in your line of sight. This system, optional on lower-spec models, allows Bluetooth hands-free calling, music streaming, voice recognition and an SMS reader that will read text messages to you. As for practicalities, well there's obviously not much room on the rear seat but in the boot, the 185-litre space is no smaller than an ordinary mainstream citycar like Toyota's Aygo would give you.

Market and Model

Pricing for this three-door Fiat 500 occupies quite a wide span - anything between around £11,000 to around £17,000 for mainstream versions, with a significant £2,500 model-for-model premium if you want the '500C' version with its electric fabric folding roof. Here though, we're focusing on the normal fixed-top three-door hatch. Bear in mind that at the bottom of the range, you'll be limited to the 69bhp 1.2-litre petrol engine we tried, entry-level 'Pop' models only available with this unit. Progress up to mid-range 'Pop Star' trim and the more efficient 85bhp TwinAir petrol engine becomes available - at a premium of around £1,300 over the 1.2. Whichever of these two petrol powerplants you favour, there's the £750 option of the Dualogic clutchless gearbox if you want it. Is it worth stretching up to a TwinAir-powered 500 model? Over 80% of buyers choose not to, before usually going on to spend the money they saved on optional extras or personalised trim. For the few who do want something more sophisticated, pokey and efficient under the bonnet and are prepared to pay upwards of £13,000 to get it, the TwinAir option has its appeal, though we'd be mindful here of two facts. First that in tweaked 'Eco' form, the base 1.2 can be nearly as economical. And second, that for not much more than TwinAir money, you could get yourself a 1.3-litre MultiJet diesel model that really would give you better day-to-day running cost returns.

Cost of Ownership

The more time we spent with this base 1.2-litre 500 variant, the more we understood why over 80% of buyers of this car choose this unit. For one thing, a lot of these people know that the quoted figures for the pokier, pricier TwinAir versions are very difficult to achieve in the real world. If fact, they're impossible to achieve unless you drive a 500 TwinAir model with its 'Eco' mode permanently activated. Almost nobody does this because the 'Eco' feature significantly limits the extra pulling power that would have prompted you to pay extra for the TwinAir model in the first place. On top of that, the four cylinder 1.2 has been getting progressively more class-competitive when it comes to efficiency, able to deliver 60.1mpg in this latest Euro6 guise - or 62.8mpg when mated to the Dualogic clutchless gearbox. The CO2 figures aren't bad either - 110g/km with a normal stick-shift or 105g/km in Dualogic form. Plus Fiat is also offering an 'Eco' version that can cut your CO2 to just 99g/km thanks to minor exterior and mechanical revisions.

Summary

To be honest, Fiat hasn't needed to do a whole lot to retain this 500 model's popularity. It still looks great, it's always been fun to drive and providing the pricing doesn't get too ambitious, the market remains there for it. As for this updated version, well issues like restrictions in bootspace and rear seat accommodation remain, but the things the brand could improve without a major redesign have been usefully updated. As a result, it's now a more modern-feeling product. In summary then, this car remains as likeable as ever, especially in its most affordable base 1.2-litre guise. Choosing a 'fashionable' little runabout can often be a risk. Here though, is one you can enjoy without a worry.

500 Not Out (new2) 17/07/2015

The 500 has been a great success story for Fiat, offering buyers a cute, retro citycar at affordable prices. With over 1.5 million sold since 2007, the Italian brand has decided it was time for an update. There's nothing too radical here, but it should usefully refresh this car's appeal. The experts and Car & Driving investigate.

Ten Second Review

Fiat's trendy little 500 citycar may look little different but it's been significantly improved. Outside, the only changes are a re-styled front grille and sleeker rear tail lights, but under the skin, the Italian brand claims that over 1,800 modifications have been made. There are cleverer infotainment systems across the range, extra efficiency under the bonnet and more options in terms of personalisation.

Background

If ever a car has built its brand, it's this one, Fiat's 500. In fact, it's done so twice. First at its original launch back in 1957. And more recently with this modern era version, first launched in 2008. Ever since, it's been a money-spinner for the Italian brand, who've never stopped trying to improve it. We got quite a wide-ranging package of updates in early 2014 that added a more powerful 105bhp TwinAir petrol unit to the line-up and gave buyers of more expensive versions the company's 'UConnect' infotainment technology. Now those UConnect systems have been rolled out across the range as part of a wider-ranging update that also brings us a slightly smarter look and a more extensive range of personalisation options. It all means that on paper at least, this car remains a strong proposition. The small, fashionable citycar segment though, has changed substantially since this model's original launch. Does this Fiat still have what it takes to compete? Let's find out.

Driving Experience

Fiat promise improvements to both ride and handling for this revised 500, though this will probably be of limited interest to the car's urban-minded audience. The petrol engine range is pretty familiar from before, which means that the entry level option is still a 1.2-litre naturally aspirated four cylinder petrol unit with 69PS. Cars fitted with this engine now receive bigger brakes to help safety and get the option of an 'Eco' package. Spend a little more and you can choose one of the two far more modern and efficient 'TwinAir' two cylinder turbocharged petrol powerplants, with either 85PS or 105PS. There's a 95bhp 1.3-litre MultiJet engine option if you want it. Plus, as before, there are potent 1.4-litre turbo petrol Abarth models on offer for hot hatch fans. Go for a 500 with a TwinAir petrol unit, as many buyers will, and you'll find that the engine can get a bit vocal if you work it hard. Even then though, the gruff, slightly throbby note is characterful rather than unpleasant and around town, refinement is more than acceptable. If you are urban-bound, you might also want to consider the optional (but rather jerky) Dualogic gearbox, a kind of manual transmission without a clutch. Unless you like all that left-foot pumping of course. City dwellers will also appreciate the tight 9.3m turning circle.

Design and Build

Fiat would've been unwise to mess with the 500's shape too much, so sensibly, they've kept exterior styling tweaks to the minimum with this improved model. As before, there's a single three-door bodystyle, though you can order it in soft-topped '500C' form if you like the idea of having an electric fabric-folding roof. As for those design changes, well up front, there's a sleeker chrome grille that sits below revised headlights and is positioned at more of an angle than before. Between these two elements are smarter daytime running lights, with a shape that echoes the zeros of the '500' logo. Rounding the front off are updated chrome trims and a ribbed bonnet that that looks a little more stylish. At the rear, there are smarter tail lights that incorporate a body-coloured panel in the centre. This has meant the reversing and fog lights have moved from the clusters to the lower rear bumper. Your Fiat dealer will also offer you a more fashionable choice of wheels, graphic packages and paint colours to round off the updates. Inside, the biggest change is the inclusion of 'Uconnect' infotainment systems on all models, although only the top 'Lounge' variant is fitted with a touchscreen as standard. Redesigned air vents flank the screen, leading to a much more integrated feel than you'd get in many more expensive cars. Drivers will also appreciate the smarter steering wheel with its chrome-plated switches. Plus, if they're in a plush 'Lounge' model, they've the benefit of an optional 7" TFT instrument cluster. The 185-litre boot remains as before, no bad thing as this still trumps many rivals.

Market and Model

As before, there's a choice of fixed-top and convertible 500 models. The open-topped 500C variants require a premium of around £2,500 over their standard counterparts. If you're happy with tin-top 500 motoring, then you'll find pricing that's a fraction higher than before, yet which still starts just shy of £11,000 for the baseline 1.2-litre Pop version. Above this variant, you can upgrade yourself to 'Pop Star' trim, which opens access to the TwinAir engine options you'll probably want. You'll need a £15,000 budget for top 'Lounge' trim. While there are cheaper and more practical cars out there, these prices are on par with other style led hatchbacks like Vauxhall's ADAM - and they undercut what you'd pay for a comparable MINI Hatch 3-door. Key options include the Dualogic semi-auto gearbox which requires a premium of around £750. So what do you get for your money? Base 'Pop' trim has LED daytime running lights and a Uconnect infotainment system with six speakers, plus AUX-in/USB ports and steering wheel remote controls. Plusher 'Pop Star' spec adds air conditioning, 15-inch alloy wheels and heated mirrors with body-colour caps. Top 'Lounge' spec meanwhile, gets you a panoramic glass sunroof, rear parking sensors, a chrome front grille, front fog lights, a leather-trimmed steering wheel and a Uconnect 5" LIVE touchscreen infotainment system with smartphone integration. If you want to go further, then your dealer will want to tell you about the latest range of so-called 'Second Skin' decal packages. 500 models are safe too, with a five star Euro NCAP safety rating, seven airbags, ABS with electronic brake distribution, electronic stability control, a Hill Holder clutch to make pulling away on an incline easier and hydraulic brake assistance to help with emergency stops.

Cost of Ownership

One of the advantages of such a small car is that tiny fuel efficient engines are more than adequate for hauling you and your little Fiat around. Even the basic 1.2-litre model is capable of 60.1mpg on the combined cycle, while producing 110g/km of CO2. These figures improve to 62.8mpg and 105g/km if you go for the optional Dualogic semi-auto gearbox. Or 65.7mpg and 99g/km if you go for the 'ECO' version. The economy champion for petrol buyers is the 85PS TwinAir petrol variant, a car capable of 74.3mpg and 90g/km of CO2 (or 2g/km less if you opt for the Dualogic 'box). Even the quickest 105PS TwinAir model manages 67.3mpg and emissions of 99g/km. For the 1.3-litre MultiJet diesel, the figures are 83.1mpg on the combined cycle and 89g/km of CO2. If you decide to go for the open-topped 500C variant with any of these engines, you'll see no penalty for either economy or emissions. What else? Well, this car should certainly be cheap to insure. For the base petrol 1.2, you'll be rated at between groups 5 and 9, for the TwinAir 85bhp, you'll be rated at between groups 10 and 13 and for the TwinAir 105bhp variant, you'll be rated at group 15. The warranty is a typical three year affair but with a 100,000 mile limit that's significantly higher than some other brands will give you. 500 models hold their value very well and that's unlikely to change any time soon. Don't be tempted to go customisation-crazy with the options list though: not everyone will share your taste or want to pay extra for graphics when it comes time to sell.

Summary

To be honest, Fiat hasn't needed to do a whole lot to retain this 500 model's popularity. It still looks great, it's always been fun to drive and providing the pricing doesn't get too ambitious, the market remains there for it. As for this updated version, well the interior improvements are welcome as is the extra technology. And there are plenty of extra personalisation options for Fiat dealers to talk about in the showroom. Otherwise, things are much as before, which means that the TwinAir two cylinder petrol unit remains a key part of this Fiat's appeal. The sound and eager response suit the car and though the quoted running cost returns are difficult to achieve in real-world motoring, it certainly makes the 500 a very cheap thing to run indeed. Yes, this model remains pretty small inside, but then smallness is all part of the appeal. You'll appreciate that when zipping around town in one. In summary then, this car remains as likeable as ever. Choosing a 'fashionable' little runabout can often be a risk. Here though, is one you can enjoy without a worry.

SEX IN THE CITY (family) 01/11/2010

Introduction

Fiat's 500 is the citycar of the moment. June Neary looks at the revised version

Will It Suit Me?

I'm pleased to say that I don't remember the original Fiat 500. It was half a century ago that car was launched after all. So I can't tell you whether the latest Fiat 500, now recently updated, is a true retro tribute to the original. Sorry. But of course, like me, you don't care. All that matters is that it's cute, it's nippy and it's the latest thing to be seen in. A MINI? That's so yesterday...

Practicalities

I was a bit disappointed to learn that for all its Italian heritage, this car is in fact built in Poland. Oh well, better news comes in the realisation that it shares its platform with the Ford Ka and, as even I know, that car has a reputation as an entertaining steer. At 1.65m wide, 1.49m high and 3.55m long, the 500 doesn't take up a great deal of space. For reference, a MINI is much wider, a little lower and a fair bit longer. Even little runabouts like Renault's Twingo won't fit into some parking spaces the 500 will be able to squeeze into. My local Lidl supermarket has a ridiculously tight underground carpark, so I can testify to the benefits of this. I tried the revised version but to me, it looks no different. For what it's worth, design changes up-front include a sleeker chrome grille that sits below revised headlights and is positioned at more of an angle than before. Between these two elements are smarter daytime running lights, with a shape that echoes the zeros of the '500' logo. As before, delicious design details drip from this design. It's like a tiny pearl, especially when the ivory finish interior fitted to my test car is specified. There's a very well-judged blend of retro chic and ruthlessly modern contemporary design inside, with circular head restraints, a glass roof and iconic 500 badging on the Panda-sourced dashboard. Chrome-ringed vents and a fascia that can be specified in the same colour as the body are just some of the interior design features. The exterior treatment is cool and clean too. The neighbours had a good old stare.

Behind the Wheel

Fiat knows how to make great little engines for great little cars. But I did wonder what the petrol TwinAir version might be like. Fiat claims that it's the world's cleanest and greenest four-seater petrol-powered production car. My expectations weren't high. Something driven by battery packs perhaps? Or perhaps so feebly powered that it would struggle to show a bike courier a clean pair of tailpipes. I was wrong. The TwinAir 500 puts out a perky 85bhp and sprints to sixty in just 11 seconds. That really is cheeky: a city runabout that's fun as well as frugal and a design that's now developed into the kind of car Fiat fans always hoped it would be following its launch in 2007. This same engine is also available in 105bhp form at the top of the range. As before, there's also a base 1.2-litre petrol variant and a 1.4-litre turbo petrol option. Of course, in preference to a 500, you could save a few thousand and buy the more practical Fiat Panda. But then, you only live once and how often are you going to need five doors in a citycar anyway? If it helps you to justify things, Fiat claims that body rigidity is around 10 per cent better than the Panda's, so in theory, the 500 should be slightly more crash-proof.

Value For Money

As before, there's a choice of fixed-top and convertible 500 models. The open-topped 500C variants require a premium of around £2,500 over their standard counterparts. If you're happy with tin-top 500 motoring, then you'll find pricing that's a fraction higher than before, yet which still starts just shy of £11,000 for the baseline 1.2-litre Pop version. Is that good value? Well, unless you save a few hundred pounds and buy a smaller smart fortwo, trendier town tots all cost more. You'll need to find at least £2,000 more on top of Fiat 500 prices to buy an equivalent MINI. Fiat's Panda is one of the cheapest cars to own, so the '500' will prove little different. The 1.2-litre petrol unit will average around 50mpg. Most frugal of all is the TwinAir model which pushes 70mpg and combines it with just 99g/km of CO2. Depreciation won't be anything like at MINI levels but will be much better than you'd expect on a Panda. Which is good news since insurance costs shouldn't be much more expensive.

Could I Live With One?

I much prefer this approach to retro design to the kind of thing BMW have delivered us with the MINI. It seems more real somehow - and infinitely more exciting. The fact that it's more affordable too is just the icing on the cake. Right now, this remains one of the most fashionable things you can be seen in up and down the high street. How long it will remain that way is, of course, quite another question...

Fiat 500 average rating: 4.5/5 (59 reviews)

- 19/07/2018, owner of a Fiat 500 1.2 Pop 3dr [Start Stop]

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
Love my Fiat 500, she is great to look at, lovely colour and style inside. Smooth economical to drive.

- 13/06/2018, owner of a Fiat 500X Special Edition 1.4 Multiair Mirror 5dr

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
Love the car, it handles incredibly well on winding country roads. Very smooth in urban traffic and a joy to drive on the motorway. If you need to accelerate quickly that's no problem. 7inch U-Connect touchscreen is very user friendly.

- 15/05/2018, owner of a Fiat 500 1.2 Pop 3dr [Start Stop]

User rating: 4.5/5

User comment:
Love my new car. She is economical, nippy and easy to park. Love the smooth mint colour too.

Read all Fiat 500 Reviews

Can I Get Credit?