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Kia Picanto 1.0 2 5dr Hatchback (2018) at County Motor Works Vauxhall

01245 932 703

£7,000

WAS £8,000, SAVE £1,000

The Kia Picanto is more polished, practical than ever before and comes well loaded with desirable essential like Front electric windows, Air conditioning, Audio system with Bluetooth that includes phone connection and music streaming. The Kia Picanto is cheap to fuel, enjoyable and keep on the road.

28/09/2018

12005

Manual

Petrol 53.3 combined MPG (WLTP)

BLACK

New Lower Price


We pride ourselves in only providing cars of the highest of standards - all vehicles are taken through a pre-delivery inspection and are fully HPI checked for your peace of mind. We price our vehicles for sale on the basis of age, condition and mileage. The vehicles for sale may have previously been used for business or hire purposes and so may have had multiple users. Where we hold documents relating to vehicle history, these are available for inspection on request and we are happy to address any specific queries before you view or make an offer to purchase any vehicle.


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Emissions and Fuel

CO2:
106 g/km

MPG:
61.4

WLTP CO2:
121 g/km

WLTP MPG:
53.3

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* Price does not include road fund license

V5 Document

V5 Document

Manuals

Manuals

Body Glass

Front and rear electric windows with drivers's auto up/down function, Heated rear window, Rear wash/wipe, Tinted glass, Variable front intermittent wipers

Brakes

ABS/EBD, ESC + BAS + VSM + HAC, Traction control

Driver Aids

Emergency stop signalling system, Motor driven power steering

Driver Information

3.8" monochrome audio display with RDS, Colour information display, Digital clock, External temperature gauge, Tachometer, Trip computer

Driving Mirrors

Day/night rear view mirror, Electric adjustable heated door mirrors

Entertainment

4 speaker audio system, Bluetooth with music streaming, Steering wheel mounted controls, USB and auxiliary socket

Exterior Body Features

Black radiator grille with chrome surround, Body colour bumpers, Body colour mirrors and door handles, Visible VIN plate

Exterior Lights

Automatic headlights, Daytime running lights, Headlamp levelling, High mount brake light, MFR Multi - Focus Reflector headlights with black bezel, Rear fog lights, Welcome and follow-me home light functionality

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Manual air conditioning

Interior Features

12V power point front, 3 x passenger assist grips, Coat hooks, Cupholders in centre console, Glovebox, High gloss lower centre fascia trim, door armrest and air vents, Leather trimmed steering wheel and gearshift, Luggage area parcel shelf, Passenger front seatback pockets, Premium cloth upholstery, Silver paint finished interior door handles, Tilt adjustable steering wheel

Interior Lights

Front cabin lights, Luggage area light

Safety

3x3 point rear seatbelts, Automatic unlocking of doors in case of impact, Dual front airbags, Front seatbelt height adjusters, Front seatbelt pretensioners + load limiters, Passenger airbag deactivate switch, Rear child proof door locks, Seatbelt warning, Side impact protection, Twin Curtain Airbags, Twin front side airbags, Tyre pressure monitoring system

Seats

60/40 split/folding 2nd row of seats, All round height adjutable headrests, Driver seat height adjust, ISOFIX Child seat top tethers and anchor fixings, Slide/reclining front seats

Security

Anti theft alarm, Engine immobiliser, Folding key, Locking wheel nuts, Remote central door locking

Vanity Mirrors

Driver and front passenger sunvisor with vanity mirror

Wheels - Alloy

14" alloy wheels

Wheels - Spare

Tyre mobility kit

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.0
Badge Power: 66
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: N
Coin Series: 2
Generation Mark: 2
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 5E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 6
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 79
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 64
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 4
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 54
NCAP Safety Assist %: 25
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 10000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 100000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 7
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO: 0.437
CO2 (g/km): 106
HC: 0.023
HC+NOx: N
Noise Level dB(A): 70
NOx: 0.019
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6
WLTP - CO2 (g/km) - Comb: 121

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: SOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 998
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 3
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: MULTI POINT FUEL INJECTION
Gears: 5 SPEED
Number of Valves: 12
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 61.4
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 68.9
EC Urban (mpg): 51.4
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb: 5.3
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Extra High: 5.9
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - High: 4.7
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Low: 6.2
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Medium: 4.9
WLTP - MPG - Comb: 53.3
WLTP - MPG - Extra High: 47.9
WLTP - MPG - High: 60.1
WLTP - MPG - Low: 45.6
WLTP - MPG - Medium: 57.6

Performance

0 to 60 mph (secs): True
0 to 62 mph (secs): 13.8
Engine Power - BHP: 66
Engine Power - KW: 49
Engine Power - RPM: 5500
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 71
Engine Torque - MKG: 9.8
Engine Torque - NM: 96
Engine Torque - RPM: 3500
Top Speed: 100

Test Cycles

Emissions Test Cycle: NEDC Correlated

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 175/65 R14
Tyre Size Rear: 175/65 R14
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: N
Wheel Type: 14" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1485
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 3595
Wheelbase: 2400
Width: 1595
Width (including mirrors): N

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 35
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1400
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1010
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 255
Max. Loading Weight: 465
Max. Roof Load: 60
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: N
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: N
Minimum Kerbweight: 935
No. of Seats: 5

THE SMALLER PIC (new2) 14/07/2017

Kia's Picanto is at its most affordable - and potentially at its most appealing - in base 1.0-litre form. Jonathan Crouch looks at what's on offer.

Ten Second Review

We know the Kia Picanto makes sense as a citycar, but this third generation model also adds a big dash of driving fun. That's an important factor when it comes to separating the best from the rest in this hotly contested sector. So, is the Kia among the class leaders? Let's check out the entry-level 1.0-litre version and try to find out.

Background

Citycars are by their nature small. In the past, that's been an excuse for some car makers to ignore the driving experience and cabin quality in the pursuit of low prices. Kia thinks differently and with the third generation version of its urban orientated Picanto model, the Korean company has introduced a big dose of driving fun that aims to elevate this car firmly into contention in this keenly fought sector. Will that convince buyers to choose the Picanto over its Fiat 500-sized rivals? Given the sharp looks of this third incarnation of the Kia, it would be a brave man who bet against this Korean extending its market share. How will it do that? A drive in the base 1.0-litre version may help us find out.

Driving Experience

City cars have to balance ease of driving around town with being able to drive on motorways with equal ability. That's no easy task, but it's one the latest Picanto manages as well as, or even better, than most of its rivals. One of the core reasons for this is the steering. It's an electrically assisted system that provides plenty of feel as you pilot the car through town or along country lanes. Just as vitally, it also imparts a great sense of stability on the motorway, so you're never left worrying about driving a city car outside of its natural habitat. nderpinning this is the way the Kia keeps the lumps and bumps of the average road at bay. Its suspension is supple and absorbs all but the very biggest potholes with grace, yet it keeps body lean in check as you corner. Add in good grip, well contained wind and road noise and you have a small car that feels very grown up. That impression is underlined by the engine range on offer in the Picanto. It starts with the 66hp 1.0-litre 'MPi' unit we're looking at here, this three-cylinder motor pulling eagerly from tick-over. There's the usual triple pot hum from under the bonnet that's pleasing to the ear, while 0-62mph in 13.8 seconds is on a par with the competition.

Design and Build

It may be the smallest car in its range, but Kia has packed in a lot of design thought and clever engineering to the Picanto. It's based on the firm's 'H platform' and has twice as much high strength steel than the previous generation. This makes it safer in the event of a crash and lighter to help save on fuel and emissions. Overall, it weighs 23 kilograms less than the last model, which is a lot for a citycar. Getting comfy in the Picanto is easy thanks to all but the base '1' model coming with a height adjustable driver's seat. The helm for all variants except the entry-point model features remote controls for the stereo, hands-free phone connection and the trip computer. You might be forgiven for thinking a city car isn't going to offer up much room on the back seat. Well, the Picanto shows you can fit a quart into a pint pot as two adults can sit in the rear quite comfortably. If they're taller, you may find knees rubbing against the front seat cushions, but elbows, shoulders and heads are accommodated easily. As for the boot, well the Picanto offers 255-litres of capacity, which puts it among the more spacious luggage carriers in this class.

Market and Model

To head off in a brand new Picanto from a Kia showroom will cost from around £10,500 for the 66hp 1.0-litre Mpi in base level '1' trim. Prices for the 1.0-litre variant rise to around £12,000 for the sporty 'GT-Line' version. You wouldn't expect bargain basement '1' trim to include much more than the basics - which is pretty much what you get; things like daytime running lights, electric front windows, a trip computer, 60/40 split-folding rear seats and USB and Aux-in ports for the two-speaker audio system. With plusher '2' trim, Kia will also throw in air conditioning, Bluetooth and rear electric windows. As for safety, well Kia says that this is the safest A-segment car it has ever made, featuring double the proportion of Advanced High Strength Steel compared to the outgoing model and a selection of active safety technologies. The stronger, lighter body is supported by six standard airbags (front, front side and curtain airbags), and an optional knee airbag, as well as a range of active safety features. These include standard Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) with Electronic Stability Control (ESC) to ensure stability under braking and cornering. In addition, this Picanto is available with Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB).

Cost of Ownership

The entry point to the Picanto range is the 66hp powerplant we've been looking at here which delivers 64.2mpg on the combined cycle and 101g/km of CO2. What about other expenses you might incur? Well, regular maintenance is required every 10,000 miles or 12 months, depending on which comes round sooner. Or you could take out the 'Care-3' package that offers fixed prices on the first trio of dealer trips, and this can be extended to five check-ups with the 'Care-3 Plus' deal. You can also bundle in an MoT test with this, so you know your car is taken care of for the whole time your name is on the logbook. Couple the titchy fuel bills with free road tax and cheap insurance and you have a car that makes all kinds of sense for city drivers. It's exactly because it stacks up so well on the balance sheet that residual values look set to be very healthy. The much-trumpeted 7 year / 100,000 warranty helps in that regard since it's transferrable to future owners. However, it is worth pointing out that the 'bumper to bumper' complete car warranty is only five years, with the extra two years of cover being restricted to the engine and gearbox.

Summary

The Kia Picanto has been nipping at the heels of the class leaders ever since it was launched. Now, in third generation form, it's no longer chasing but firmly among the best in this tightly contested sector. Yes, even in this base 1.0-litre guise. It does this not so much by being radically different or brilliant in one area, but by doing everything well. It's well made, has plenty of safety kit and comes with a good amount of equipment in most versions. Simply put, the Picanto is the right car at the perfect time for Kia. It sums up what we love about citycars, from nimble driving to frugal running costs, all backed up by a generous warranty. It all makes this one of the very best models in this class we've seen in a long time.

THE BIGGER PIC (new2) 17/03/2017

Kia's Picanto has earned a reputation as a no frills city scoot but this improved version of the third generation model feels a far better finished item. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Review

In third generation form, Kia's Picanto is a little citycar that's big in importance for its Korean maker. This improved version is stylish, frugal and practical, it may just redefine the way many people think about this smallest category of car.

Background

Here's how we used to understand small car categorisation and the difference between Fiesta-sized superminis and their smaller, cheaper citycar counterparts. You paid extra for a supermini because it was slightly bigger, because it was better finished and more stylish and because it had more refined engines that made possible longer journeys. So where does that kind of thinking leave us with a product like this, the improved version of the third generation Kia Picanto? It competes with the kinds of models we'd see as citycars, yet like many of them now, it boasts the kind of interior space a supposedly bigger Fiesta or a Corsa had until quite recently. It's very nicely built and acceptably stylish. And yes, it's quite at home attempting longer journeys. Here is the citycar, all grown-up. Where that leaves today's supermini sector is something we don't have to worry about here. Suffice it to say that most of what you'd pay up to £18,000 or more for in that class of car is delivered by this Kia. Other urban runabouts that have previously advanced that argument have either been expensive and/or three-door only, like say a Fiat 500, or have felt too cheap and noisy to really justify themselves as only-car transport, like a Suzuki Ignis or, I suppose, a Hyundai i10. I mention the Hyundai because that essentially is what this Picanto is underneath. Kia has used the underpinnings from this best-selling design, then refined them, improved the build quality and added a sharp new suit of clothes on top. On paper, a pretty effective route to creating a class-leading contender. Let's see if it's worked.

Driving Experience

Kia hasn't added its latest mild hybrid tech into the Picanto's engine range, but it has introduced its latest 'Smartstream' technology to improve efficiency. There's now a choice of two 1.0-litre three cylinder units (the previous 1.25-litre 83bhp powerplant having been deleted). Things kick off with a normally aspirated 67PS unit. But ideally, you'd want the 1.0-litre T-GDI (turbocharged gasoline direct injection) 100PS power unit borrowed from the larger Rio supermini. Both engines are paired with a five-speed manual transmission, delivering power to the front wheels. As an option, Kia is offering a new Automated Manual Transmission (AMT) gearbox. The AMT set-up is based around a five-speed manual transmission with clutch and gear shift actuators to automate clutch operation and gear shifts. Basically, there's the ease-of-use of an automatic transmission, without sacrificing the fuel efficiency of a conventional manual gearbox. On the move, pretty much everything is as before. Refinement continues to be well controlled for a citycar - indeed Kia says the Picanto offers the quietest cabin of any A-segment model, both at idle and at a steady cruise. The handling's stable too, though obviously, this isn't the kind of car you'd choose for dynamic enjoyment. The Picanto's dinky dimensions also enable the pitch centre of the car to be placed further towards the rear, helping to naturally reduce 'nose dive' under braking without firming up the suspension and potentially compromising ride comfort.

Design and Build

This third generation Picanto hasn't been visually changed too much. In fact, it hasn't been changed at all in terms of base-spec variants. The 'GT-Line' and 'X-Line' versions though, do get a few tweaks, with revisions to the 'tiger-nose' front grille, which gets red highlights with 'GT-Line' models and black trim with the 'X-Line' variants. There are also redesigned headlights with LED daytime running lights and LED tail lamps. And revised bumpers, plus a wider lower air intake. As usual, all Picantos have a 5-door body shape with Kia's wide C-pillar as a design motif. Inside, the main large lies with the addition of a larger 8-inch 'floating' widescreen audio visual navigation display for plusher models. There's also a further 4.2-inch display in the instrument binnacle between the dials. Kia designers have created a more modern, refined cabin with this third generation model, with classier materials and a smarter layout. Depending on trim level and market, the Picanto's interior is offered with black cloth or synthetic leather seats, with the upgraded model finished with a range of fresh upholstery textures for a more contemporary, higher quality look and feel. The cabin is finished with black, silver or gloss black highlights in the door, on the dashboard and around the gear selector. A range of trendy interior colour packs can customise the cabin too. At the back, buyers get a choice of a bench offering either four or five seats. And behind that, there's a 255-litre boot that's almost class-leadingly big for a citycar.

Market and Model

Pricing to be pretty similar to what went before, which means a Picanto range priced in the £10,500 to £16,000 bracket. There are five mainstream trim levels - '1', '2', '3', 'X-Line', 'GT-Line' and 'GT-Line S'. The 'X-Line' variant has SUV styling cues. If within that range, you can stretch to a plusher model, you'll get yourself a citycar fitted out with some of the most advanced infotainment and convenience technologies available in the A-segment. Primarily, we're referring to the large, 'floating' 8.0-inch touchscreen at the centre of the dashboard which houses a navigation system with 3D mapping and is available with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for full smartphone integration. This features Kia's latest UVO Connect Telematics system, giving Picanto drivers access to live traffic information, weather forecasts, points of interest, fuel prices, and details of potential on and off-street parking. A rear-view parking camera with dynamic guidelines is also on offer to buyers who want an additional level of assurance when completing parking manoeuvres. An optional wireless smartphone charger and USB port, located at the base of the centre console, ensures that drivers can keep mobile devices charged on the move. A range of trendy interior colour packs are also available. As for safety, well Kia says that this is the safest A-segment car it has ever made. Depending on specification, the Picanto's latest 'ADAS' camera safety portfolio includes Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist (FCA) with vehicle and pedestrian detection. Additionally, the Picanto is available with Blind-Spot Collision-Avoidance Assist (BCA), Lane Keeping Assist (LKA), Driver Attention Warning (DAW), and Lane Following Assist (LFA). LFA uses the front-facing camera and sensors to monitor road markings, controlling the Picanto's steering to keep the car in the centre of its lane. The Picanto also features Rear Cross-Traffic Collision-Avoidance Assist (RCCA), which alerts the driver and stops the vehicle if it detects another vehicle approaching from the left or the right when reversing out of a parking space.

Cost of Ownership

No car in this class has a sniff of a chance unless it can guarantee tiny day to day running costs and the Picanto tries hard to answer that particular call, aided by this revised model's latest 'Smartstream' engine technology. The 1.0-litre T-GDi engine now features a more efficient 350 bar high-pressure fuel injection system. Meanwhile, the naturally-aspirated engine replaces multi-point injection with new dual-port fuel injection technology, with optimised injection timing for maximum fuel efficiency. Both units feature improved exhaust gas recirculation lines, and optimised intake valve timing, for maximum fuel efficiency improvements. And both engines are equipped with a new Integrated Thermal Management System (ITMS), which provides more effective combustion chamber cooling. ITMS varies engine cooling characteristics based on the engine's operating point. If you go for the 1.0-litre 67PS engine, the WLTP figures are 53.3mpg (combined) and 121g/km. With the 1.0 T-GDI turbo variant, 50.4mpg and 128g/km is quoted. Couple the titchy fuel bills with free road tax and cheap insurance and you have a car that makes all kinds of sense for city drivers. It's exactly because it stacks up so well on the balance sheet that residual values look set to be very healthy. The much-trumpeted 7 year / 100,000 warranty helps in that regard since it's transferrable to future owners. However, it is worth pointing out that the 'bumper to bumper' complete car warranty is only five years, with the extra two years of cover being restricted to the engine and gearbox. If the car is sold through a Kia Used Approved Dealership when less than 18 months old or with less than 18,000 miles on the clock, the warranty will be topped up to match that of a new model.

Summary

It's not uncommon to assess a vehicle and wonder why it has been launched. Some manufacturers get their product design cycles out of phase with economic conditions, while others launch into a once fashionable market that's gone cold. Then there are those that arrive plum square with the right product at the right time and the Picanto is most definitely one of the latter. It doesn't do anything that's particularly fresh or radical but its blend of affordability coupled with solid engineering, impressive build quality, generous equipment and clean styling build upon its tiny ongoing running costs to form a convincing buying proposition. Back that up with a great warranty and this improved Kia Picanto emerges as one of the very best citycars we've seen in quite some time.

PIC UP A BARGAIN (used) 04/08/2017

By Jonathan Crouch

Introduction

In second generation form, Kia's Picanto proved to be a little citycar that was big in importance for its Korean maker. Stylish, frugal and practical, it was much better than the cheap and cheerful original version and played its part in redefining the way many people think about this smallest category of car. Let's check this MK2 model Picanto out as a potential used buy.

Models

3/5dr Citycar (1.0 / 1.1 petrol [1, Air, 2, SR7, 3, 4, City, VR7, Halo, Quantum, Sport])

History

Here's how we used to understand small car categorisation and the difference between Fiesta-sized superminis and their smaller, cheaper citycar counterparts. You paid extra for a supermini because it was slightly bigger, because it was better finished and more stylish and because it had more refined engines that made possible longer journeys. So where does that kind of thinking leave us with a product like this, the second generation Kia Picanto? It competes with the kinds of models we'd see as citycars, yet like many of them these days, it boasts the kind of interior space a supposedly bigger Fiesta or a Corsa had until quite recently. It's very nicely built and acceptably stylish. And yes, it's quite at home attempting longer journeys. Here is the citycar, all grown-up. Other urban runabouts that have previously advanced this argument have either been expensive and/or three-door only, like say a Fiat 500, or have felt too cheap and noisy to really justify themselves as only-car transport, like a Suzuki Alto or a Hyundai i10. We mention the Hyundai because that essentially is what this Picanto is underneath. In creating this MK2 model Picanto, Kia used the underpinnings from the best-selling i10 design, then refined them, improved the build quality and added a sharp new suit of clothes on top. That proved to be a pretty effective route to creating a class-leading contender and this MK2 Picanto sold in useful numbers for the brand until it was replaced by a new third generation design in the Spring of 2017.

What You Get

The original MK1 Picanto model, ground-breaking though it was for its brand at the time of its original launch back in 2004, was very much a product of old-school Kia. A nice enough design, and very popular with 1.1 million global sales, but clearly a car for the cash-strapped. This MK2 model, in contrast, was more the kind of thing that back in 2011, you might have imagined Audi making. The exterior looks don't immediately pigeonhole you as a budget buyer in the way that the styling of, say a Hyundai i10 does. Perhaps it's no coincidence that stylist Peter Schreyer is an ex-Audi man. He developed the trademark 'Tiger nose' front grille that adorns most Kias from this period. In this case, it complements smart looks that extend down sharply scalloped flanks with door handles sitting atop a prominent longitudinal crease. MK2 Picanto buyers were offered a choice of both three and five-door guises, the three-door car featuring a more aggressive frontal treatment and a unique rear C-pillar. Things continue on in the same vein inside a cabin that punches well above its price point. It's all a long way from the not too distant days when interiors of cars of this kind had all the stylistic appeal of a telephone box. True, some of the plastics used here are still a little hard to the touch but you'd expect that in a citycar and anyway, everything's so nicely integrated that you don't really notice, the ambience lifted considerably by a silver strip that runs along the lower half of the dash to lift the otherwise unremitting blackness of the cabin. Take a seat behind the very up-market-feeling steering wheel and you find yourself facing the so-called 'three cylinder' instrument panel where everything's clear, concise and easy to read. To your left is a centre console offering ventilation and stereo controls with big, easy to use buttons. Finding an ideal driving position is hampered a little by the lack of a reach-adjustable steering wheel but there is a height-adjustable driver's seat in mitigation. As for rear seat passengers, well, the amount of room in the back is astonishing for a car that takes up less than 3.6m of roadspace. Not much of the 60mm increase in vehicle length of this MK2 model went into the wheelbase - it's just 15mm bigger than that of the previous car - but even so, a range of clever packaging ideas created a cabin in which a couple of 6ft adults could sit reasonably comfortably on all but the longest journeys, despite legroom which could best be described as 'cosy'. Even more effort was made in the boot, 27% larger than that of the MK1 model. Mind you, that still only means a necessarily tight 200-litre capacity (up from 157-litres in the previous design), which might be a problem if you're trying to fit in something like a pushchair. This indeed is one of the few areas in which a fully-fledged supermini might enjoy any kind of significant advantage over this car. Mind you, even that won't be a problem if you're able to flatten the 60/40 split-folding rear seats, which push forward to free up 870-litres of fresh air.

What You Pay

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What to Look For

Very little goes wrong with typical second generation Picanto models; in fact, our ownerships survey almost completely failed to find anyone at all who was dis-satisfied. The closest we came to that was with an owner who complained of sticking rear brake callipers. Otherwise, just look out for the usual things; kerbed alloys and damage caused to interior plastics by unruly children. Make sure that the service book is fully stamped up by a franchised dealer too.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a 2013 Picanto 1.0 ex VAT) An air filter will be priced at around £9, an oil filter will sit in the £6 to £7 bracket and a radiator will be priced at around £100. The brake discs we came across sat in the £28 to £30 bracket, with pricier-branded discs costing up to around £47. Brake pads are in the £18 to £27 bracket for a set, though you could pay up to around £34 for a pricier brand. A clutch kit is about £160. Wiper blades cost in the £3 to £4 bracket, though you could pay in the £13 to £27 bracket for a pricier brand

On the Road

One characteristic that Kia was keen to carry over to this car from the previous MK1 model Picanto was that car's perky feel. Although the original model was never quick (you could hardly beat 15s from rest to sixty even in the fastest version), it handled reasonably crisply and the steering was geared such that it felt almost criminally good fun to punt around city streets, even if your speed never exceeded 30mph. Okay, so the 1.0 and 1.1-litre engines were almost impossible to tell apart but it was a car that put a smile on your face. This second generation version offers a bit more variation between its pair of powerplants, with entry level buyers seeing 69bhp from their 1.0-litre engine, whilst those opting for the 1.25-litre Kappa unit have 85bhp at their disposal. The difference between the two is actually bigger than the outputs might suggest, and not only because the faster version's 11.0s showing from rest to sixty is a couple of seconds quicker than its stablemate. For a start, the lower-powered 69bhp variant has just three cylinders, so is inevitably noisier when you push it hard, as you have to in order to make rapid progress. Those likely to need their Picanto to undertake longer journeys on any kind of regular basis will be better off shaking the piggybank a little further and opting for the four cylinder 1.25-litre model. It's 121Nm of torque means that urban trips need fewer gearchanges, while out of town, it's a surprisingly comfortable car in which to cover off motorway mileage. Even at the legal limit and just above, thanks mainly to a triple-layer dashboard bulkhead sound-deadening panel, it's possible to hold a conversation comfortably, by no means a given in a car of this kind. And when things get twistier? Well, the good news for those looking for a grin behind the wheel is that much of the original Picanto model's suspension architecture was carried over to this MK2 design, albeit evolved subtly. The front suspension was tuned for better straight line stability, and Kia reckons it not only improved the ride with softer springs but made the handling a little keener with a much stiffer rear axle that helps quell understeer. Braking from the all disc system is far better than that of the previous car, the stopping distance from 62mph being just 41m. Not quite such good news is that the MDPS motor-driven electric power steering system is a little vague for really enthusiastic use, but its very lightness will be welcome when wheel-twirling in urban settings where as you'd expect, this car is simple to park.

Overall

The days when all a citycar had to be was small, frugal and cheap are long gone. Those things are now a given in this sector. For success in this segment today, such an urban runabout must be stylish, practical and realistic for longer journeys as well as shorter ones. The need to achieve all of that whilst still being small, frugal and cheap must present one almighty headache to vehicle designers. But by and large, this car achieves it. We're not pretending this MK2 Picanto to be perfect. The 1.0-litre version could be a little quieter and needs stop start. And it would be nice if the boot was a little bigger. But these things apart, we've struggled to find fault with this car. In terms of looks, packaging, running costs and general day-to-day usability, Kia set a new benchmark with this model. What it boils down to is that though you can spend less on a used citycar from this period, after trying one of these, you probably won't want to.

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