Audi R8 5.2 FSI Quattro GT 2dr R Tronic Automatic Convertible (2012) at Lamborghini Chelmsford

01245 924 920

£77,500

WAS £85,000, SAVE £7,500

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18/09/2012

17671

Automatic

Petrol 19.9 combined MPG

WHITE

New Lower Price


We pride ourselves in only providing cars of the highest of standards - all vehicles are taken through a pre-delivery inspection and are fully HPI checked for your peace of mind. We price our vehicles for sale on the basis of age, condition and mileage. The vehicles for sale may have previously been used for business or hire purposes and so may have had multiple users. Where we hold documents relating to vehicle history, these are available for inspection on request and we are happy to address any specific queries before you view or make an offer to purchase any vehicle.


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Phil Hamberger

Phil Hamberger
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Manager's Comment

open quoteThis is an incredible example of an Audi R8 GT Spyder in White.close quote

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CO2: 332 g/km

MPG: 19.9

Body Glass

Electric front windows, Heat insulating glass, Heated rear window

Brakes

ABS/EBD, ASR, Ceramic brakes, EDL traction control, ESP, Hill hold control

Chassis/Suspension

Sports suspension

Driver Aids

Audi parking system plus with front and rear sensors, PAS

Driver Information

Driver's information system, DVD Satellite navigation system plus + 6.5" colour monitor with radio + MP3 player, Service interval indicator

Driving Mirrors

Auto dimming and folding door mirrors, Carbon door mirror trims, Electrically adjustable and heated door mirrors

Entertainment

Audi music interface, Auxiliary input socket

Exterior Body Features

Body colour bumpers, Carbon fibre rear spoiler, Fully automatic acoustic hood, Matt carbon fibre rear diffuser, Matt titanium grey fuel cap, R8 scuff plates, Twin exhaust tailpipes x2, Wind deflector

Exterior Lights

Daytime running lights, LED brake lights, LED headlights with headlight washers

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Electronic climate control (ECC), Matt carbon rear air outlets

Interior Features

Adjustable steering column, Audi exclusive monoposto and door pulls trim inlays in matt carbon, Black Alcantara headlining, Cupholders in centre console, Jack and tool kit, Polished aluminium gear lever and gate, Stainless steel pedals

Interior Lights

Exit lights in doors, Illuminated lockable passenger glove compartment

Packs

Light package - R8

Safety

Driver/front passenger airbag, Fasten seatbelt reminder, Front passenger airbag deactivation, Front side airbags, Tyre pressure monitoring system, Warning triangle and first aid kit

Seats

Front headrests, Sports bucket seats

Security

Anti theft system, Electronic immobiliser, Locking wheel bolts, Remote central locking, Valet parking key

Vanity Mirrors

Sun visors with mirrors

Wheels - Spare

Tyre mobility system

General

Badge Engine CC: 5.2
Badge Power: 560
Based On ID: 48479
Coin Description: FSI Quattro
Coin Series: GT
Generation Mark: 1
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 50E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Front/Side Impact - Discontinued February 09: 9
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: N
NCAP Pedestrian - Discontinued February 09: 9
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: N
NCAP Safety Assist %: N
Special Edition: True
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 60000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 332
HC+NOx: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 5

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 5204
Cylinder Layout: V10
Cylinders: 10
Engine Layout: MID ENGINE NORTH SOUTH
Fuel Delivery: MULTI POINT FUEL INJECTION
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 40
Transmission: SEMI-AUTO

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 19.9
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 27.7
EC Urban (mpg): 13.1

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 3.8
Engine Power - BHP: 560
Engine Power - KW: 412
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 8000
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 398
Engine Torque - MKG: 55
Engine Torque - NM: 540
Engine Torque - RPM: 6500
Top Speed: 197

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 235/35 R19
Tyre Size Rear: 295/30 R19
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: GT
Wheel Type: 19" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1244
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 4434
Wheelbase: 2650
Width: 1904
Width (including mirrors): 2029

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 80
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1940
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): N
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 100
Max. Loading Weight: 300
Max. Roof Load: N
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: N
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: N
Minimum Kerbweight: 1640
No. of Seats: 2
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 11.4

THE POWER OF TEN (used) 12/09/2012

By Andy Enright

Introduction

Genuine mid-engined exotics don't tend to wear German badges. Yes, there have been a few such anomalies down the years, but they rarely received the acclaim of their Italian counterparts. Here's the car that broke the mould, the Audi R8. Here was proof that you could buy a car with the charisma and presence of a Lamborghini and the engineering of, well, of an Audi and in V10 guise it has the performance to match. If you've been put off buying a supercar in the past because of their fragility and flakiness, here's where you should be looking to buy used.

Models

2dr coupe, convertible (5.0 petrol [GT, Plus])

History

It's easy to become a little bit blase about motor show prototypes. It's fairly easy to create a sexy shape, but it takes a whole lot more fortitude to green light the car for production, with all the engineering headaches that go with passing emissions regulations, crash tests, making exotic materials a production reality and so on. Therefore when Audi showed the Le Mans quattro concept car at the 2003 Paris Show, we all cooed, thought it looked very nice but weren't expecting anything like it to make production. And it didn't. Not for three years in any case. Then at the 2006 Paris Show, Audi showed the R8, named after its hugely successful Le Mans winning sports car. This was the production-ready vehicle and, to be honest, it didn't look that different from the 2003 show car. Onlookers were suitably flabbergasted. Rivals were caught on the hop. In truth they should have seen it coming. Audi's purchase of Lamborghini in 1998 led to a gradual but accelerating cross-fertilisation of ideas. The Italian company benefited from Audi's quality control, production efficiency and expertise in aluminium construction while the Germans got a halo marque, access to Lamborghini's carbon-fibre speciality and an insight into understanding high-end buyers. It was a win-win and it didn't take long to realise that there was a lot of Lamborghini Gallardo in the R8's genes. The R8 first appeared as a V8 model, using much the same 4.2-litre normally aspirated engine that powered the acclaimed RS4 saloon, but the clamour for more power saw it receive a modified version of the Gallardo's 5.2 V10 in 2009. Suddenly the R8 had become very serious, packing 525PS and being offered in both a coupe and a Spyder convertible model. A more track-focused 560PS GT coupe variant was announced in very limited numbers, with just 333 being sold worldwide and 33 of those coming to the UK. A Spyder version was announced in May 2011 at Le Mans. A refreshed version of the R8 was shown at the China Motor Show in August 2012. The old R-tronic automatic gearbox was replaced by a twin-clutch S-tronic, the styling had been subtly refreshed and an R8 V10 Plus was introduced as the flagship model. This featured the same carbon fibre reinforced plastic used on the R8 GT. The front splitter, mirrors, side blades, rear diffuser and lining for the engine compartment are all constructed of the lightweight material. The 5.2-litre V10 was also slightly improved compared to the standard V10 model, producing 550PS and 540Nm of torque. What You Pay (used_pay)

What You Get

Improving on the V8 model was a tall order and the R8 V10's weight distribution has shifted a couple of percentage points towards the rear whilst retaining the same torque split for the four-wheel drive system. The interior gets Nappa leather and satellite navigation as standard, while the exterior receives carbon sideblades, a big rear diffuser, all-LED headlights, twin ovoid exhausts, 19-inch alloy wheels and discreet V10 badging. Given that most V8-engined R8s have been heading out of dealerships specified to a point somewhere north of £90,000, the relatively modest premium Audi ask for the V10 looks money well spent.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

Make sure the car is in perfect condition. There's no reason why it shouldn't be, as it will be within warranty, but any dents, scratches or interior damage will knock values hard. It's a buyers' market right now. Check for crash damage at the front, and inspect the tyres for signs of uneven wear. The majority of cars that crop up on the used market will have been equipped to well above standard spec. Typically, there will be around £10,000 worth of extras and demand for the R8 is such that sellers will be able to reflect this outlay in the asking price. Avoid outlandish colour combinations and the R8 should be a sound bet by supercar standards. The running gear is tried and tested and shouldn't throw up too many problems. Otherwise insist on a full service record.

Replacement Parts

(approx prices for a 2011 R8 5.2 FSI coupe - ex Vat) Tyres are around £375 a corner and you'll need to spend around £600 on a replacement clutch assembly, while brake pads are around £150 for the front pair and £100 for the rears. Door mirrors are £250 per unit.

On the Road

The engine you probably know about. It's much the same powerplant that's plumbed into the Lamborghini Gallardo LP560/4, but so as not to cause much arm waving down at Sant'Agata, this direct injection engine is detuned to a mere 525bhp where the Lambo gets the full-strength 552bhp unit (and charges buyers an additional £45k for the privilege). That's still enough power to catapult the all-wheel drive R8 to 60mph in just 3.7s on the way to a 196mph maximum. In terms of price and performance, it's a very close match for the Porsche 911 Turbo, but when it comes to providing a thumping soundtrack, the Audi wins every time. The V10 might not be the most musical of engines, but it's undoubtedly purposeful and with huge reserves of torque, it's not an engine that you'll need to constantly keep on the boil. A six-speed gated manual box is fitted as standard or there's the option of the R-tronic paddle shifter. This isn't a slick twin-clutch affair but does a good job of preventing the car bouncing off its rev limiter. Despite the adulation poured on the rather tedious clackety-clack open-gated manual, I really rather warmed to the Lambo-derived R tronic with its aggressive Sport mode and surprisingly adept 'automatic' system. Arrive mid-corner at speed and the R8's handling balance gives you options. It's softer-edged than its distant cousin, the Lamborghini Gallardo, but more benign, offering plenty of feedback as to what's going on at the tyre contact points. Ride, handling, brakes, visibility, and engine note all get the thumbs up. In fact, it's hard to pinpoint one aspect of this car's dynamics I don't like. Perhaps the steering could use a little more weight. That's about it.

Overall

The Audi R8 is a hugely desirable thing. In V10 guise it's harder and faster with a very different personality to the V8. Is it a better car? That's a tough one to answer. If given the choice, I'd always opt for the sweet-natured, tuneful and tractable V8 model, but drive the two back to back and you can see where the V10 just takes chunks out of the smaller car. It's just that much brawnier and deep-lunged. Effortlessly rapid and with a darker personality, it feels a more serious piece of kit. As a used buy it makes a lot of sense as the steepest part of the depreciation curve is done and dusted on earlier models and bargains can be had as buyers offload cars that have just come out of warranty. Searching out a decent warranty continuation plan is always a good idea but look at the small print very carefully. This is a complex and expensive car. Otherwise, there's a lot to recommend. Supercar ownership without the typical nightmares? Why do you think the R8 has been such a runaway success?

IT'S GRRRRR 8 (used) 02/03/2018

BY STEVE WALKER

Introduction

Ambition can be a dangerous thing but through the late nineties and early noughties, it seemed to be propelling Audi to greater and greater feats of expansion. The marque which had previously played third of fourth tambourine to its illustrious German rivals BMW and Mercedes-Benz was on the march but just how far was it prepared to go? The new models kept coming but it was the R8 that really showcased the scope of the desire burning within Ingolstadt. Audi had built a supercar.

Models

Models Covered: R8 two-door coupe - 4.2 V8, 5.0 V10 petrol

History

Behind Audi's dramatic growth from manufacturing three models lines in 1990 to being well into double figures by 2007 was the guiding hand of the Volkswagen Group. Audi was being groomed as a direct rival for BMW and Mercedes-Benz in the premium car markets and had become that by the time the R8 came onto the scene in October 2006. A supercar to shine its illustrious light down on lesser models in the range can be of real benefit to a brand like Audi but the costs associated with developing a convincing one are huge. Fortunately, the Volkswagen Group already had a formidable mid-engined supercar on its books in the breathtaking shape of the Lamborghini Gallardo. With four-wheel-drive and a cabin heavily reliant on Audi switchgear, the Gallardo was a perfect option to form the basis of the R8. Audi was always at pains to emphasise the differences between the two cars and that workers at its subsidiary company quattro GmbH fitted over 5,000 unique parts by hand to each car but the links to the Gallardo became common knowledge and did the R8 the power of good, primarily because it was £60,000 cheaper. In the interests of keeping the R8 pricing accessible and preserving the Volkswagen Group brand heirachy, the R8 was launched with Audi's 4.2-litre V8 engine 414bhp. It took until 2009 for the car to get the 5.2-litre V10 that powers the Gallardo and then it was in 518bhp guise where the Lamborghini by that stage was available with as much as 552bhp. The formidable V12 TDI diesel R8 was unveiled at the 2008 Geneva motorshow.

What You Get

One of the most fascinating things about the R8 is its complex, unorthodox shape. Viewed in profile, it's not conventionally beautiful, looking a little stretched and with some strange design features such as the awkward ridge at the rooftop and the rather weak looking haunches. Move around the car and the shape improves with front and rear three-quarter views looking especially muscular. There are many details to soak in. The side blades which channel air to the engine come in many different colours and finishes. Look closely at the headlights and you'll see an R8 logo etched into the main beam reflector. The twelve LED running lamps that rim the light pod look particularly menacing when looming out of the darkness. This was a feature that first appeared on the R8 but was rolled out across the Audi range. The engine bay is beautifully displayed and the interior is an object lesson in how to package a two seat car with plenty of space, decent visibility and fantastic Audi build quality. The monoposto fascia sweeps from door handle to door handle in a broad arc, encompassing the main dials and information system. There's room in the front boot for a couple of squashy bags and there's also a slot behind the seats but the R8 is otherwise not long on luggage space.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

The majority of cars that crop up on the used market will have been equipped to well above standard spec. Typically, there will be around £10,000 worth of extras and demand for the R8 is such that sellers will be able to reflect this outlay in the asking price. Avoid outlandish colour combinations and the R8 should be a sound bet by supercar standards. The running gear is tried and tested and shouldn't throw up too many problems.

Replacement Parts

Spares for the R8 promise to be less expensive than for more exotic supercars.

On the Road

Prior to the R8, Audi made a number of rather half-hearted attempts at building a convincing sports car. This from a company that can build a racing car so brilliant it could probably win Le Mans driven by Rio Ferdinand and Cristiano Ronaldo. In short, Audi always had the ability to build a fantastic sports car for the road but for one reason or other, didn't. Instead, it chose to patronise the enthusiast with some so-so offerings packing a lot of engine but all the subtlety of an elbow to the ocular orbit. Things changed with the R8. And how. The main engine you probably know about. It's the same 420bhp 4,163cc V8 that powered the RS4, a car that moved Audi in the right direction but which still regards its driver as a bit of a berk. Punting 1,560kg of R8 up the road isn't much of an impediment for this powerplant and 60mph will flash by in 4.5 seconds on the way to 187mph. Audi also fitted the 518bhp V10 petrol engine borrowed from the Lamborghini Gallardo. So far, so predictable. What is a genuine eye-opener is the way the R8 involves the driver, crediting its pilot with some judgement and skill. Arrive mid-corner at speed and the R8's handling balance gives you options. It's softer edged than its distant cousin, the Lamborghini Gallardo, but more benign, offering plenty of feedback as to what's going on at the tyre contact points. Both the six-speed manual and the sequential R tronic gearbox have merit. We usually detest sequential manuals but really rather warmed to the Lambo-derived R tronic with its aggressive Sport mode and surprisingly adept 'automatic' system. Ride, handling, brakes, visibility, and engine note all get the thumbs up. In fact, it's hard to pinpoint one aspect of this car's dynamics we don't like. Perhaps the steering could use a little more weight. That's about it.

Overall

The portents weren't particularly good for an Audi supercar given the quality of the brand's previous sportcar efforts but it still took a brave person to bet against the firm from Ingolstadt on the form it was showing in 2006. The R8 ultimately justified its existence and then some using the technology from the Lamborghini Gallardo to deliver an exhilarating supercar driving experience coupled with ultramodern looks and Audi's cool brand image. Perhaps R8's greatest claim to fame is that this was the first car for years to dent the armour of the mighty Porsche 911. The 997 version of the 911 was winning car magazine comparison tests with monotonous regularity until the R8 reared its head. Mission accomplished Audi.

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