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Jeep Wrangler 2.0 GME Rubicon 4dr Auto8 Automatic 4x4 (2020) at Renault Bury

01617 178 923

£48,000

WAS £50,815, SAVE £2,815

Demonstrator Model (call to confirm mileage) - The All-New Jeep Wrangler Rubicon is the most capable Wrangler ever. True to its heritage, it has the traction to handle some of the harshest and most unpredictable driving conditions. Specification includes Uconnect 8.4 inch with Navigation, Climate Control, 7 inch Thin Film Transistor Instrument Cluster with Speedometer, Rubicon hood decal, Keyless enter-n-go, Steering wheel mounted audio controls and much more.

10/09/2020

550

Automatic

Petrol 25.7 combined MPG (WLTP)

BLACK

New Lower Price


We pride ourselves in only providing cars of the highest of standards - all vehicles are taken through a pre-delivery inspection and are fully HPI checked for your peace of mind. We price our vehicles for sale on the basis of age, condition and mileage. The vehicles for sale may have previously been used for business or hire purposes and so may have had multiple users. Where we hold documents relating to vehicle history, these are available for inspection on request and we are happy to address any specific queries before you view or make an offer to purchase any vehicle.


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Sean Thompson

Sean Thompson
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Our Demonstrator Model Wrangler comes loaded with great desirable features and is part of our 'Nearly New Range'. Mileage may vary. Book your test drive today!

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Emissions and Fuel

CO2:
213 g/km

MPG:
28.3

WLTP CO2:
259 g/km

WLTP MPG:
25.7

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* Price does not include road fund license

V5 Document

V5 Document

Manuals

Manuals

General

Badge Engine CC: 2.0
Badge Power: 268
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: GME
Coin Series: Rubicon
Generation Mark: 3
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 40D
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 7
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 2
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 50
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 69
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 1
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 49
NCAP Safety Assist %: 32
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 60000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO: 0.4101
CO2 (g/km): 213
HC: 0.027
HC+NOx: N
NOx: 0.023
Particles: 0.0005
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6
WLTP - CO2 (g/km) - Comb: 259
WLTP - CO2 (g/km) - Comb - Max: 259
WLTP - CO2 (g/km) - Comb - Min: 254

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1995
Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 84
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 90
Fuel Delivery: TURBO DIRECT INJECTION
Gears: 8 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: AUTO

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 28.3
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 34
EC Urban (mpg): 23.5
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb: 11
WLTP - MPG - Comb: 25.7

Performance

Engine Power - BHP: 268
Engine Power - KW: 200
Engine Power - RPM: 5250
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 295
Engine Torque - MKG: 40.8
Engine Torque - NM: 400
Engine Torque - RPM: 3000
Top Speed: 97

Test Cycles

Emissions Test Cycle: WLTP

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 255/75 R17
Tyre Size Rear: 255/75 R17
Tyre Size Spare: FULL SIZE
Wheel Style: N
Wheel Type: 17" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1848
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 4882
Wheelbase: 3008
Width: 1894
Width (including mirrors): N

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 81
Gross Vehicle Weight: 2574
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1059
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 548
Max. Loading Weight: 621
Max. Roof Load: 45
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 2495
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: N
Minimum Kerbweight: 1953
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 12.28

A TRIP ACROSS THE RUBICON (new2) 22/03/2019

If you thought Jeep's Wrangler was strictly for Californian rock hoppers and D-list boy band members, think again. Jonathan Crouch puts it to the test in 'JL'-series generation Rubicon guise.

Ten Second Review

The Jeep Wrangler is an icon that has managed to remain loyal to its roots while adapting to the changing spirit of the times. If you think that it's strictly for Californian rock hoppers and D-list boy band members, then think again. This latest 'JL'-series fourth generation model is the most credible Wrangler yet, especially in this top 'Rubicon' form, justifying what Jeep sees as its position as the only true off-road company in the market.

Background

The Jeep Wrangler is one of the most iconic serious SUVs on the planet and has never been a car to shy away from even the toughest SUV conditions. Like those this 'JL'-series model was launched into at the end of 2018. By then, the European market had decided what a fashionable SUV should be like and it wasn't anything remotely resembling this. But the Wrangler's always gone its own way and for the few who want something more authentic, its appeal remains very much unique. The 'JL' design offers better off road angles, more ground clearance and a tighter turning circle. But at the same time, today's Wrangler needed to offer slightly wider appeal. For that, brand owners Fiat Chrysler knew that a completely fresh generation of powertrains would be required. And areas like ride quality, refinement and day-to-day usability would need to be completely re-evaluated. As they have been with this 'JL'-series car. It's a Wrangler - but perhaps not quite as you know it. Let's take a closer look at the wheel of the most focused 'Rubicon' version.

Driving Experience

Previous Wranglers never had to be very good on road. As long as they didn't shake your fillings out on the way to your surf shack, all would be forgiven once you set a tyre on the rough stuff. But Marlboro men are in short supply these days and to keep this car in customers, Jeep had to appeal beyond those who might use their cars as weekend mountain playthings. Without diluting what makes a Wrangler a Wrangler. No small task. How successful you'll perceive the designers' efforts to have been depends whether you've experienced previous versions of this Jeep. If you haven't, then you're likely to find the wind noise, the rumbly demeanour and the vague steering all pretty crude. Those coming to this car from an older Wrangler though will find this 'JL'-series model a vast improvement. The revised steering's much better and the revised five-link suspension means that potholes no longer feel like craters. The main changes though with this MK4 design have taken place beneath the bonnet. Buyers now choose between a 200hp 2.2-litre Multijet diesel or the 272hp 2.0-litre petrol turbo unit we tried, both engines available only mated to a slicker-shifting 8-speed auto gearbox. As with all proper off roaders, there's a two-speed transfer case offering a series of dedicated 4x4 driving settings - '4H', '4H part-time' and the '4LO' crawler gear. With the slightly more road-orientated 'Sahara' and 'Overland' variants, all this works through a 'Command-Trac' 4WD system, but with this more serious top 'Rubicon' derivative, there's a heavy duty 'Rock-Trac' 4WD set-up, which uses a tougher low range crawler ratio. 'Rubicon' models also get detachable 'Sway bars' for extra suspension travel; heavy duty Dana front and rear axles that can be manually locked with the brand's 'Tru-Lok' electric front and rear axle lockers; and gnarlier BF Goodrich 32-inch tyres. All of this delivers an extreme level of off road capability. And once you've experienced it, you'll view this Jeep in a whole different light.

Design and Build

The Wrangler format is iconic: a simple boxy body dropped onto an old-style ladder-frame chassis with a folding screen, detachable doors and a removable roof. You don't mess with that. Or with the familiar frontage, which offers up the usual circular headlights and familiar seven-slot grille. Look more closely though and you'll find that much has changed, as the designers have sought to subtly evolve the look for this fourth generation 'JL'-series model. That front grille for instance now has a canted upper section and its outer slats intersect with headlights that now feature full-LED beams from Magnetti Marelli. Even the vertical windscreen is different - it's now not quite so vertical and features a new 4-bolt design at the top of the frame that allows it to fold down far more easily, though you've still got to get your socket set out to do it Up-front, you're faced with a dashboard structure as bluff as the north face of the Eiger, but it's much more appealing than the boring plasticky layout that characterised the interior of the previous 'JK'-series model. The coloured fascia frontage aims to reference the metal-panelled dashboards used in much earlier Wranglers and the previous tightly sectioned centre stack has given way to a more open layout, though one absolutely festooned with knobs and buttons. Everything's of much better quality than anything that buyers of this model have seen before. Plus there's a sophisticated 8.8-inch centre-dash 'Uconnect' infotainment screen and a further 7-inch TFT display between the conventional dials in the instrument binnacle. We should talk about the open air aspect; all Wranglers come as standard with a three-piece Modular Hard Top with these lift-off front panels. The rear section must be removed with a socket set.

Market and Model

Pricing for this Rubicon model start at around £46,000 for the 2-Door version; add around £1,500 more for the 4-Door body shape most will want. The 2.0-litre GME petrol turbo unit is the same price as the 2.2-litre Multijet diesel. For true Wrangler aficionados, only this ultimate 'Rubicon' variant will do. It gets the more serious 'Rock-Trac' 4WD system, which uses a tougher low range gear ratio, heavy duty front and rear axles and 'Tru-Lok' electric front and rear axle lockers to tackle really extreme off road trails. Also helping a Wrangler Rubicon in dealing with this type of terrain are the 32-inch BF Goodrich Mud-Terrain tyres and an electronic front sway-bar disconnect system to provide additional wheel travel when conditions call for it. As for options, well we think the key thing to decide here is how you want your Wrangler's roof to be. Some might find the three lift-out panels of the standard 'Freedom Top' to be rather fiddly and cumbersome, which is why Jeep offers some other choices that replace the detachable panels with various forms of fabric hood. On the 2-Door variant, this takes the form of a manually-operable 'Premium Soft Top', covering the whole of the roof and available with either clear or tinted windows. On the 4-Door version, you can have what the company calls a 'Black Sunrider Soft Top' that slots in behind the two removable 'Freedom Top' panels (these available either in black or body colour). The 'Sunrider' hood folds back manually like the roof on a Mazda MX-5. Or, even better, you can have it specified in 'Sky One-Touch Power Top' form, with electrical operation.

Cost of Ownership

A typical 4-Door Rubicon diesel model manages up to 36.2mpg on the combined cycle and 206g/km of CO2. Or 37.7mpg and 197g/km for the 2-Door. For the 2.0-litre petrol 4-Door Rubicon, you're looking at 28.2mpg and 213g/km; or 28.2mpg and 211g/km for the 2-Door. Insurance varies between groups 37D and 41D. These days, Jeep offers a much more competitive customer aftersales package - the brand's '5-3-5' offer which gives you a five year / 75,000 mile warranty, three years of servicing and five years of roadside assistance. Talking of servicing, the petrol models need a garage visit every year or every 9,000 miles - whichever occurs soonest. For the diesel variants, it's every year or 12,500 miles. What else might you need to know? Well the CO2 figures quoted and the high purchase will see the few company Wrangler users paying a hefty 37% Benefit-in-Kind tax and a £310 Luxury Car Vehicle Excise Duty supplement, which means a total road tax outlay of £450 in the first six years of ownership. At least residual values should be strong. Industry experts CAP HPI reckon that after the standard three year/60,000 mile period, a Wrangler 4-Door 2.0-litre petrol variant would still be worth 41% of its original purchase price.

Summary

You've still got to be serious about hard core off-road driving to consider a Jeep Wrangler - but not quite as serious as you had to be before. This 'JL'-series model offers considerable improvements in refinement, quality and technology. Which allows it to make a decent fist of providing versatile family transport for the user who doesn't mind making a few sacrifices at the altar of comfort, ride and handling. It's got a style all of its own, but its heart and soul remain on the Rubicon Trail rather than on the Kings Road. Thank goodness for that. Of course, it'd be a terrible choice if your SUV will have a heavy diet of on-road work - but that's like criticising a supercar for having a small boot. Horses need to be matched with courses and if, just occasionally, those will take you to the back of beyond, you'll be glad you chose a Wrangler for the trip. If previous generation versions of this Jeep weren't for you, you probably still won't like this one. No problem: the market's stacked with compromised alternatives. But if you've always wanted an excuse to choose one of these, this 'JL'-series model's extra polish and new-found sophistication provides it. It's now a vastly more capable all-rounder. But it's still very much a Wrangler. And that's all that really matters.

WRANGLER RAISES ITS GAME (new2) 14/11/2011

If you thought Jeep's Wrangler was strictly for Californian rock hoppers and D-list boy band members, think again. The current 'JL'-series fourth generation model offers new engine technology and has smarter looks. Jonathan Crouch reports

Ten Second Review

The Jeep Wrangler is one of the most iconic serious SUVs on the planet and has never been a car to shy away from even the toughest off-road conditions. The current model is this fourth generation 'JL'-series version, which takes a completely fresh approach beneath the bonnet, introduces modern safety standards and features a redesigned interior. There's even a PHEV derivative. It's still very much a Wrangler though.

Background

A bit of history first. Shortly after the surface of the earth cooled, vertebrates appeared, developed into dinosaurs and then died for reasons still not fully understood. Shortly thereafter, the Willys Jeep was built and spawned countless generations of Wrangler models, first driven by cigar-chomping beefcakes in aviator sunglasses who hadn't realised World War II had ended. Unfortunately, the brand image suffered a terrible knock in the mid Eighties when boy band Bros chose the Wrangler as their vehicle of choice. Bear with me, we're nearly there. Realising that the Wrangler just didn't cut it in an increasingly sophisticated world, Jeep subjected it to major surgery, creating the 'TJ' series model in 1997. This sold until the launch of the 'JK' series design in 2006, which was replaced by the current 'JL'-series fourth generation model in 2018. With the 'JL', the challenge for Jeep was to modernise the vehicle without alienating the hardcore fans of the marque. The first step was to make sure it rode a whole lot better than its predecessor (which wasn't too difficult). Since then, the brand has concentrated on gradually enhancing powertrain refinement and efficiency. Having done so, the company has tweaked the exterior looks, creating the MK4 model we're going to look at here.

Driving Experience

Just about the only way we can describe the ride of pre-2007-era Wrangler models to the uninitiated is to imagine being stricken with a rather severe case of haemorrhoids and then being superglued to a spacehopper. Perhaps that's a tad harsh but after the novelty of an old Wrangler's bouncy ride had worn off, you were left with a vehicle that could crawl through deep mud but which wasn't much good at anything else. With the current 'JK' series car, things certainly improved - if not dramatically then, at least, unequivocally. This design is much quieter than its predecessors too, thanks to beefed up insulation from engine and road noise. There's a choice of two conventional engines - a 2.2-litre Multijet II diesel with 200hp and 450Nm of torque. And a 2.0-litre turbo petrol unit with 265hp and 400Nm of torque. Both are mated to 8-speed auto transmission. Sadly, the rorty 3.6-litre V6 Pentastar petrol unit is no longer offered to European markets. You can though, talk to your dealer about a PHEV version, the Wrangler 4xe, which mates the 2.0-litre petrol engine to a motor generator unit and a 400V 17kWh battery pack which when charged, can offer up to 25 miles of electrified driving. These days, the Wrangler offers two active, on-demand full time 4WD systems - known as 'Command-Trac' and 'Rock-Trac'. These use next-generation Dana axles, Tru-Lock electric front and rear-axle lockers, a Trac-Lok limited-slip differential and an electronic front sway-bar disconnect system. Whichever engine you go for, the Wrangler is still brilliant off road, with its super aggressive approach and departure angles. Opt for the entry-level Sport or Sahara trims and the car comes with clever brake lock differentials. In the two-door short wheelbase line-up, the range-topping Rubicon model gets even more specialist front and rear locking differentials. On road manners feel safe and predictable, if a little slow-witted, but there are decent levels of grip and, on broken or rutted surfaces, the handling is no longer stymied by a bouncy ride.

Design and Build

Changes to this Wrangler's looks yo create this fourth generation design include small styling changes to the instantly recognizable keystone-shaped grille, iconic round headlamps and square tail lamps. Plus there are improved aerodynamics and Jeep promises a convenient fold-down windscreen for off-road purists, even more open-air freedom and dozens of different door, top and windscreen combinations. Quite a lot though, hasn't changed at all. The trapezoidal wheel arches, the external door hinges and the rubber bonnet catches are all present and correct, so the Wrangler still looks properly butch. The cabin is pretty spacious in all dimensions and a fold and tumble feature for the rear seat virtually doubles the available cargo capacity, while the curved glass windscreen reduces drag and helps refinement. On the inside, the cabin is actually a lot more car-like that you expect it might be, with decently smart surfaces, a neat instrument panel, plenty of storage areas and an intuitive switchgear layout. Heated, power mirrors are optional and rearward visibility is aided by large rear windows.

Market and Model

The fourth generation Jeep Wrangler is offered in two or four-door configurations. Pricing starts at just under £49,000 for the two-door models, offered in Overland and Rubicon forms. Most buyers choose a four-door variant (for which the starting price is about £48,500), with a choice of Sahara, Night Eagle, Overland and Rubicon trims. Engine-wise, the main selection is between a 2.0-litre petrol or a 2.2-litre CRD diesel, priced identically. Either way, you have to have 8-speed auto transmission. You can also talk to your dealer about the clever '4xe' PHEV plug-in petrol version. As for kit, well even on basic variants, expect to find 16-inch steel wheels, a DVD-compatible stereo with six speakers and remote keyless entry offered as standard. Range topping Rubicon variants will have a '4:1 Rock Trac' part-time four-wheel drive system, electronic front detachable anti roll bars, Tru-Loc front and rear axles and performance suspension. New features this time round include LED headlamps and tail lamps, plus a more sophisticated Uconnect infotainment system with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and the choice of 5.0, 7.0 or 8.4-inch touchscreens with pinch-and-zoom capability. An array of safety and security systems are also now on offer, including Blind-spot Monitoring with Rear Cross Path detection, a ParkView rear backup camera with dynamic grid lines, electronic stability control (ESC) with electronic roll mitigation and four standard air bags. It makes it sound as if the Wrangler has become gentrified. Don't be fooled. Bottom line? Only buy this car if you're very serious about off-roading. Otherwise you'll merely be wasting your money.

Cost of Ownership

All the available engines have all the right efficiency kit to offer a big step forward for Wrangler buyers when it comes to CO2 and fuel consumption stats. An engine stop/start system features with every powerplant. The 2.0-litre petrol unit combines the use of a Twin Scroll turbocharger, a new C-EGR system, central direct injection and the independent liquid cooling intake of air, throttle body and turbo, all in a bid to reduce consumption. The combined cycle fuel figure is 31.4mpg and 201g/km with manual transmission (WLTP). The 2.2-litre diesel meanwhile, features a multiway EGR system, with LP EGR and HP EGR, both cooled. In addition the air is cooled with a Water Cooled Air Cooler that helps to reduce emissions. The aftertreatment has a underfloor SCR system that reduces NOx to negligible values and a DOC and DPF close coupled to the engine for the particulate Matter reduction. Both these aftertreatment systems makes the vehicle compliant to the latest RDE Euro 6/D standards. The combined cycle fuel figure is 36.7mpg and 202g/km with manual transmission (WLTP). The Wrangler 4xe hybrid powertrain has three modes of operation, known as E Selec. The driver can select the desired powertrain mode via buttons mounted on the instrument panel, to the left of the steering wheel. Regardless of the mode selected, the Wrangler 4xe operates as hybrid once the battery nears its minimum state of charge. There are three settings. In the first, 'Hybrid', this default mode blends torque from the 2.0-litre engine and electric motor. In 'Electric', the powertrain operates on sero-emission electric power only until the battery reaches the minimum charge or the driver requests more torque (such as wide-open throttle), which engages the 2.0-litre engine. The third mode, 'eSave' prioritises propulsion from the 2.0-litre engine, saving the battery charge for later use, such as EV off-roading or urban areas where internal combustion propulsion is restricted.

Summary

Jeep has had to walk a very precarious tightrope in its improvements to the Wrangler. On the one hand, they needed to make it smarter and more relevant to the majority of SUV buyers, while at the same time not alienating those customers who loved the model's rough, tough go-anywhere ability. After looking at this MK4 'JL'-series model, we think many brand loyalists will feel that the company has succeeded in achieving this. Although still not a good choice if your SUV will have a heavy diet of on-road work, this Jeep is now a more capable all-rounder, more comfortable and with a much improved interior. But it's still very much a Wrangler. And that's all that really matters.

Jeep Wrangler average rating: 5/5 (1 reviews)

Mrs Christine Desler - 07/12/2015, owner of a Jeep Wrangler Hard Top Special Edition 2.8 CRD Black Edition 4dr Auto - 2015

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
Love my car.

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