Citroen C1 1.0 VTi Feel 3dr Hatchback (2016) at Oldham Motors Citroen, Fiat and Jeep

This citroen C1 for sale comes with an array of spec such as Air conditioning, Apps control, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Connections for USB and auxiliary audio devices, Cup holders for front seats, Navigation via mobile phone, Single 7.0 inch touch sensitive multi-function display screen, Call us now or Contact us online and one of our associates will get back to you ASAP

30/03/2016

13856

Manual

Petrol 68.9 combined MPG

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Adam Ingham

Adam Ingham
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open quoteThe citroen c1 has Distinctive exterior styling and is Quite fun to drive in town. it comes with a great spec of bluetooth technology and a multi touch screen displayclose quote

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CO2: 95 g/km

MPG: 68.9

V5 Document

V5 Document

MOT Certificate

MOT Certificate

Keys

Keys

Manuals

Manuals

Service Log Book

Service Log Book

The citroen C1 for sale comes with an array of spec such as Air conditioning, Apps control, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Connections for USB and auxiliary audio devices, Cup holders for front seats, Navigation via mobile phone, Single 7.0 inch touch sensitive multi-function display screen, Call us now or Contact us online and one of our associates will get back to you ASAP

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.0
Badge Power: 68
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: VTi
Coin Series: Feel
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 6E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 80
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 80
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 4
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 62
NCAP Safety Assist %: 56
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 10000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 60000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: N
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: N
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO: 0.59
CO2 (g/km): 95
HC: 0.034
HC+NOx: N
Noise Level dB(A): 69
NOx: 0.009
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 998
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 3
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 71
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 84
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: MULTI POINT FUEL INJECTION
Gears: 5 SPEED
Number of Valves: 12
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 68.9
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 78.5
EC Urban (mpg): 56.5

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 13
Engine Power - BHP: 68
Engine Power - KW: 50
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 6000
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 71
Engine Torque - MKG: 9.8
Engine Torque - NM: 96
Engine Torque - RPM: 4800
Top Speed: 99

Tyres

Tyre Size Front: 165/60 R15
Tyre Size Rear: 165/60 R15
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: N
Wheel Type: 15" STEEL

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1460
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 3466
Wheelbase: 2340
Width: 1615
Width (including mirrors): 1884

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 35
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1240
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 780
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 196
Max. Loading Weight: 400
Minimum Kerbweight: 840
No. of Seats: 4
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 10

STILL THE ONE? (new2) 28/03/2014

The Citroen C1 aims to boost its appeal with a slightly smarter look, extra equipment and a revamped Vti 72 engine. Jonathan Crouch reports

Ten Second Review

The Citroen C1 used to be a smart pick if you were after a cheap and cheerful city car. The latest version isn't content with being a budget option; it's tilting at the class lead. With improved comfort, new safety and connectivity equipment, and a new-generation engine, it's in with a shot.

Background

Earlier generation versions of the Citroen C1 offered cheap, cheerful transport - but not a lot else. This second generation model though, launched in 2014, has tried to give us a bit more, with trendier looks and even the option of a fabric-roof version. But competition in the citycar sector is fierce, particularly from this model's near-identical design stablemates, the Peugeot 108 and the Toyota Aygo, which both roll out of the same Czech factory. Hence the changes recently visited upon the C1 range. You might be surprised at how sophisticated this car's now become.

Driving Experience

The C1 driving proposition has always been pretty straightforward. It's a citycar that's small, manoeuvrable, easy to see out of and, as you realise very early on jinking about town, very simple to operate. Original versions of this second generation model could be had with two three cylinder Vti petrol engines, a 1.0-litre 68bhp unit and a 1.2-litre 82bhp powerlant. These units have now both been replaced by a brand new Vti 72 Euro 6.d-TEMP engine, which comes with either a 5-speed manual gearbox or a (rather jerky) ETG semi-auto transmission. The auto variant will certainly suit urban-bound folk, people who'll appreciate the light steering and a kerb-to-kerb 10m turning circle so tight that even if you spot a parking place on the other side of the road, you may be able to throw a quick U-turn to snaffle it. When reversing into a narrow bay, it's almost comical how little car there is behind the rear seats and it's worth remembering that you can afford to leave yourself some breathing room at the back. Parking like this is especially easy thanks to the light power steering that'll twirl you easily into the smallest slot.

Design and Build

The C1 is offered in both three and five-door versions and there's a soft-top 'Airscape' fabric folding roof if you want it. The car features only minor styling changes in this improved form. The distinctive glass tailgate back panel features a smarter chevron badge and a new Citroen monogram located above the boot handle. The vehicle is signed 'C1' in the latest Citroen typeface, on the lower right side. Otherwise, it's as you were, this car distinguished most overtly by a very unusual front lighting graphic. This comprises of a vertical LED daytime running light above which there's a big round headlight pod with another lighting strip that forms an 'eyebrow' above it. Citroen has clearly worked at creating a visual continuity between the windscreen and the side windows, with a swooping waistline and blacked-out windscreen pillars. The interior of the C1 is bright and airy with a colourful theme. Designed with clean, structured lines, the dashboard features bright colours on the multimedia panel, air vent trim and gear lever base. The door panels also include body-coloured inserts. There are storage compartments throughout the cabin with cup holders and a glovebox able to hold a one-litre bottle. The 196-litre boot isn't very large but it's easy to access, with the parcel shelf folding away when the tailgate is opened. With the rear seats folded, boot capacity increases to a respectable 780-litres.

Market and Model

Prices start at just over £9,000 for a three-door entry-level C1. Changes to the range include the addition of fresh paintwork colours. And fresh driver aids like Active Safety Brake, Lane Departure Warning, Hill Start Assist, Reversing camera, Keyless Entry and Start and a Speed Sign Recognition and Recommendation system. The 7-inch infotainment monitor's 'Mirror Screen' smart-phone mirroring capability has been increased and the unit works with both Apple and Android 'phones. As before, the spec on the entry-level three-door-only C1 Touch is rather basic. We'd certainly be tempted to budget another £1,700 and opt for the C1 Feel which can be ordered with three or five doors. Go for five doors and you'll also get the option of the Airscape folding fabric top. Feel-level equipment runs to air conditioning, a DAB digital radio, that 7" centre touch screen and steering mounted controls, along with body coloured door mirrors and door handles. You can go a step further and choose the C1 Flair, which sports 15" alloy wheels and also gets a speed limiter, rev counter, reversing camera, electrically heated and adjustable door mirrors, a leather steering wheel and dark tinted rear windows. Available options include automatic air conditioning, automatic headlights, keyless entry & start and styling details such as black leather upholstery and White and Sunrise Red colour packs.

Cost of Ownership

Citroen would have ticked the fail box quite comprehensively were this C1 not particularly clean and efficient. Keeping the weight down to well under 900kg has helped, as has fitting ultra low rolling resistance tyres. Expect just under 70mpg on the combined cycle from the new Euro 6.d-TEMP VTi 72 petrol engine - and under 95g/km of CO2, which is very class-competitive. Insurance groupings range from 6E, which means that the C1 makes a great choice for newly qualified or younger drivers looking for their first car. Here, it'll probably help that the body panels are designed to pop straight off, which makes accident damage cheap and easy to fix. Talking of maintenance, it would be good if Citroen (and Peugeot for that matter) felt able to match the five year/100,000 mile cover that Toyota offers on the Aygo: here, you merely get the usual 3 year/60,000 mile Citroen package. Still, on the plus side, you'll find that most spares are inexpensive, as you have the choice to source the majority of mechanical items from a Toyota or a Peugeot outlet as well as from a Citroen dealership. There's also three years warranty against rust and 12 years of anti-corrosion protection.

Summary

The Citroen C1 is an interesting case. On the face of it, this model looks like the car that's going to lose out against the boldly-styled Toyota Aygo and the more punchy badge equity of the Peugeot 108. The Citroen, it would seem, is only going to make a persuasive case for itself if dealers can do some savage price undercutting. That's the received wisdom. The facts may well play out rather differently. I like what Citroen has done in offering more choice than citycar customers are accustomed to. There's three or five doors, a frugal little petrol engine, three core trim levels, a choice of manual or automatic transmissions and beyond that the personalisation options. If you want your citycar just so, without having to compromise, the C1 is going to be one of the first places you go. Otherwise, things are much as it's always been. The C1 is going to continue to appeal to those who just want cheap wheels and it's still going to cost a pittance to run. The thing is, it's got more in its armoury than just low running costs now. Its rivals will need to keep a very watchful eye on how this plays out.

C1, WANT ONE? (used) 14/03/2014

BY ANDY ENRIGHT

Introduction

The C1 has undoubtedly been a success story for Citroen in the UK. With 80,000 sales between its initial launch in 2005 and the refreshed model we look at here, which arrived in 2012, this popular city car did all that could reasonably be asked of it. Ultimately, it was overtaken by newer and smarter rivals but as a used buy, it makes a great deal of sense. Here's what to look for when tracking down a used example.

Models

(3/5 door city car: 1.0 petrol [VT, VTR, VTR+, Edition, Platinum, Connexion])

History

Citroen is a company with a distinguished track record in small cars and the C1 joined the ranks of the most successful. It pioneered a new citycar market niche for Citroen, as their previous tot, the Saxo, campaigned in the next supermini class up. Originally launched in 2007, the C1 was sister car to the Peugeot 107 and the Toyota Aygo, all three cars built at the Kolin factory in the Czech Republic. The C1 was facelifted in 2009 and then again in 2012 and it's these post-2012 cars we look at here. The big change with the April 2012 car was that the diesel engine option was deleted. Citroen pushed the new Efficient Tronic Gearbox (ETG) quite hard in their promotions, despite it being one of the worst transmissions foisted on a citycar since Smart's awful lash-up in the City Coupe. Needless to say, by far the majority of sales went to manual cars. In August 2012, Citroen launched the rather gimmicky Connexion special edition which was claimed to be crowdsourced from Facebook fans ideas. Despite the rather naff concept, the car itself wasn't at all bad. Based on the C1 VTR trim, the C1 Connexion got 14"alloy wheels, dark tinted rear windows, Caldera Black metallic paint and Scarlet Red exterior and interior detailing, adding £500 to the asking price in the process. The C1's trim levels were revised at the end of 2013. Out went VT, VTR and VTR+ and in came VT, Edition and Platinum. A new Citroen C1 was unveiled at the 2014 Geneva Show. Not before time, some would argue.

What You Get

There have been any number of mid-life facelift to cars that have gone wrong. In fact, we'd probably wager that tinkering with an original design ruins the proportions more often than not. Thankfully Citroen resisted drastic surgery. The C1's pert shape was standing the test of time very nicely and the 2012 model year changes ran to an updated front end with shorter bonnet. The headlights kept their rounded shape, while the front bumper were entirely redesigned to house fog lights and LED daytime running lights. The vertical design LED light signature - which mirrors the style of the DS3 and C4 AIRCROSS - gives the C1 a bolder personality. It retains its simple glass tailgate and features the brand's new chevrons and badging. This last of the first generation C1 models also get 'Notus' design 14" wheels and is also available with 'Rift' 14" alloy wheels on the range-topping cars. Headroom inside the car isn't at all bad, even for someone well over six feet tall, while the big glass area up front gives an airy feel to the cabin. The rear of the three-door car is notably more claustrophobic and is really only suitable for kids and short journeys. Rear knee room in the five door model is little better and at least here, the car's beltline is slightly lower, making it feel a little less hemmed in. Boot space is the same, whether you choose the three or the five-door - 139-litres with all the seats in place or 751-litres with the rear seat folded. Citroen also freshened the interior for the end of the first generation C1 production run, with revised upholstery designs and a restyled gear lever and steering wheel. The ETG gearchange system featured paddle shifts for the first time, which make gear changing on the fly a lot more convenient. Citroen's first stab at the ETG system (used in earlier cars) had required the driver to prod a lever back and forth to change gear manually, which many owners felt a bit too close to a conventional stick shift. The paddleshift option worked much better. The post-2012 C1 model was also offered with a range of what Citroen dubbed 'Creative Technologie' features. Things like a higher-tech stereo system, here better integrated into the dashboard. It featured a time display and on plusher variants, you'll find that the CD audio part of the system comes with a 'Connecting Box' which is able to read all MP3 formats and is equipped with a Bluetooth function. It's accompanied by USB and jack connections at the base of the central console, so hooking up any sort of data stick, phone or MP3 player to the stereo shouldn't prove problematic.

What You Pay

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What to Look For

The C1 is a pretty tough little thing given the amount of abuse it has to soak up. Not a lot ever goes wrong with the 1.0-litre engine and the electrical systems are also reliable. What aren't quite so good are the parts where cost has clearly been taken out of the car. The carpets can wear quickly, plus the parcel shelf is flimsy and owners report it sagging. Check for kerbed alloy wheels and the usual inner city trolley rash. The ETG gearbox can occasionally be temperamental, so check that all gears engage cleanly. Don't worry if it jolts and lurches. They all do that.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a 2012 C1VTR 1.0) C1 consumables are affordably priced, with an oil filter retailing at around £8, a starter motor retailing at around £90 and front brake pads costing a very reasonable £30 a pair. The best part is that if you don't like the price of the Citroen bits, you can usually track down a bargain with the interchangeable Toyota or Peugeot items.

On the Road

You're not going to get a whole lot of choice when it comes to the engine in these later first generation C1 models. There's but one powerplant, a 998cc petrol unit with a trio of tiny cylinders that thrum away tunefully. Drive it as if you'd stolen it and you'll see 60mph come and go in 14 seconds, but most customers will be a little more circumspect with the throttle and will instead enjoy the C1's crisp drive off the line, ability to squeeze through tight gaps and its handy 3.44m turning circle. Of course, there are many who choose a citycar exactly because most of their driving is in nose to tail traffic, and a good proportion of these people see a manual gearchange as a fitment that makes a tedious activity only more onerous. Citroen has an answer here in the form of the ETG transmission complete with steering-mounted paddle controls. It takes quite some getting used to in order to drive smoothly but it will certainly save your left leg a whole lot of effort. We'd rather stick with a manual and avoid the frustration.

Overall

Looking back at its production life, the first generation Citroen C1 citycar seemed to have more refreshes, relaunches and re-releases than virtually any other model this side of a Bugatti Veyron, but don't worry too much about the details. At its heart, the C1 remains a fundamentally good design, with a willing 1.0-litre petrol engine, a space-efficient cabin, a respectable amount of safety kit and ultra-low running costs. If anything, it's even more appealing as a used purchase, especially if you can pick up a clean low mileage example of a later post-2012 car like those we've been looking at here, ideally one that's just been used to nip to the local shops. For younger drivers looking for a first runabout that's affordable but not a total snooze and rightly considering this C1 as one of their main options, it's really hard to go too far wrong.

SMALL BUT PERFECTLY FORMED (family) 06/04/2018

Citroen's C1 fits a great deal into very small dimensions. June Neary checks it out

Will It Suit Me?

In many ways, Citroen's little second generation C1 is very different but what's remained the same is that it has stayed state of the citycar art. It's astonishing how much space the designers have crammed into so small a vehicle. Not a millimetre remains unused in the wheel-at-each-corner stance. If I was urban-bound with a tight, confined parking space outside my mews-style residence, this little French runabout might well suit me down to the ground. It looks a little smarter these days too, after significant changes that have given it a sleeker front end and more efficient running costs. As before, this car shares its underpinnings with Toyota's Aygo and Peugeot's 108.

Practicalities

Unlike many citycars, the C1 offers a choice of either three or five-door body styles. Packaging of course is where a car like this lives or dies. I think the designers have actually done a pretty good job with the space they had to work with but at the end of the day, you still can't fit a quart into a pintpot. The rear of the three-door car is rather claustrophobic and is really only suitable for kids and short journeys. Rear kneeroom in the five door car is little better but at least the car's beltline is a little lower, making it feel a little less hemmed in. Headroom inside the car isn't at all bad though, even for someone well over six feet tall, and the big glass area up front gives an airy feel to the cabin. Citroen tend to produce bold and exciting interiors and the C1 continues that trend. At the same time however, the design is neat and ergonomically sound. In other words, just seconds after getting in, you'll know where everything is and how to work it. If you're using the back seat, then you won't be expecting it to be very spacious, given that this car is just 3.4-metres in length and has a wheelbase unchanged over that of the diminutive original version. In fact, due to a bit of design cleverness, Citroen has actually managed to free up an extra 9mm of legroom back here. It's still not enough to make longer journeys comfortable for taller adults, but more ordinary folk will survive without too much grousing on short to medium-length trips. I might even think of cramming three kids on this bench, were it not for the fact that, rather annoyingly, there are still only two belts provided. If you do have kids, then I'd definitely go for the five-door model. Total luggage room with the rear seats in place is 196-litres, but drop the rear seats and there's over 750-litres of space. This makes the C1 a citycar that can do more than just a light shop. As you'd expect, parking at the supermarket for the weekly mission isn't going to present too many difficulties. At just 1.6m wide, the C1 can easily take advantage of those awkward spaces next to the concrete columns that are so often rejected. What's more, at just 3.4m long, you'll probably be able to access the tailgate while still tucked safely into your bay, away from errant trolleys and distracted drivers.

Behind the Wheel

There is now only one engine option, a 72hp 1.0-lite VTi 72 petrol unit now capable of 68.9mpg on the combined cycle and under 100g/km of CO2 (even if you go for the auto gearbox option). With any car as small as this one, it's easy to feel threatened by larger road users. Best to remind yourself then, that the C1 is likely to have better safety systems than many a sizeable 4x4. As well as a specially developed body structure that incorporates crumple zones and impact absorbers at the front and rear, the C1 also boasts ISOFIX child seat anchor points, reinforced doors and six airbags. What's more, it's also well equipped to avoid a fender bender in the first instance with anti lock brakes with electronic brakeforce distribution and corner stability control. The little Citroen has also been designed to limit the consequences of a pedestrian impact - wise indeed for a car that will doubtless spend much of its life in the urban environment. The front end features no sharp edges and impact absorbers up front also help to limit leg injuries. There's plenty of clearance between the impact absorbing bonnet and the top of the engine which means that shock is dissipated without coming into contact with anything hard.

Value For Money

The range starts with the entry-level 1.0-litre variant in three-door form at just over £9,000. If you go for anything other than the base variant, bear in mind that you're verging into territory where the same money will buy you a larger Fiesta-sized runabout from the fully-fledged supermini class.

Could I Live With One?

As an only car? I'd need to be a city-dweller. As a second car? Well for that, the C1 would be just about perfect.

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