Fiat Panda 4x4 CROSS TWINAIR 4X4 0.9 5 door Hatchback (2018) at Warrington Motors Fiat, Peugeot and Vauxhall

01925 934 123

£11,000

WAS £11,500, SAVE £500

Features include Alloy and leather multi-function steering wheel with tilt adjustment, Automatic air conditioning with one climate control zone, Automatic full and part-time four wheel drive with descent control, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Central door locking: Operated by remote, Computer includes average speed, average fuel consumption, instantaneous fuel consumption and range for remaining fuel, USB and iPod input, LED day time running lights, Front fog lights, Piano black trim on dashboard, alloy look trim on centre console and leather gearknob, Steering wheel mounted remote audio controls, Voice activating system includes audio player and includes phone, 24.0 degree maximum slope approach angle and 34.0 degree maximum slope departure angle and much more.

01/11/2018

4328

Manual

Petrol 57.6 combined MPG

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CO2: 114 g/km

MPG: 57.6

V5 Document

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Keys

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Manuals

Manuals

Features include Alloy and leather multi-function steering wheel with tilt adjustment, Automatic air conditioning with one climate control zone, Automatic full and part-time four wheel drive with descent control, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Central door locking: Operated by remote, Computer includes average speed, average fuel consumption, instantaneous fuel consumption and range for remaining fuel, USB and iPod input, LED day time running lights, Front fog lights, Piano black trim on dashboard, alloy look trim on centre console and leather gearknob, Steering wheel mounted remote audio controls, Voice activating system includes audio player and includes phone, 24.0 degree maximum slope approach angle and 34.0 degree maximum slope departure angle and much more.

General

Badge Engine CC: 0.9
Badge Power: 90
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: TwinAir [90]
Coin Series: Cross 4x4
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 10U
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 8
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 45
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 16
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 0
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 47
NCAP Safety Assist %: 7
Service Interval Frequency - Months: N
Service Interval Mileage: 18000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 999999
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: N
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: N
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 129
HC+NOx: N
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 875
Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 2
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 80.5
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 86
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: TURBO INJECTION
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 8
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 57.6
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 65.7
EC Urban (mpg): 47.9
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb - Max: 7.7
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb - Min: 7.6
WLTP - MPG - Comb - Max: 36.7
WLTP - MPG - Comb - Min: 37.2

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 12.8
Engine Power - BHP: 90
Engine Power - KW: 66
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 5500
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 107
Engine Torque - MKG: 14.8
Engine Torque - NM: 145
Engine Torque - RPM: 1900
Top Speed: 102

Test Cycles

Emissions Test Cycle: NEDC Correlated

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 185/65 R15
Tyre Size Rear: 185/65 R15
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: N
Wheel Type: 15" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1657
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 3705
Wheelbase: 2300
Width: 1662
Width (including mirrors): 1882

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 35
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1585
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 870
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 225
Max. Loading Weight: 420
Max. Roof Load: 60
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 800
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 400
Minimum Kerbweight: 1165
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 9.3

CROSS TRAINER (new2) 09/05/2014

The Fiat Panda Cross reprises a longstanding tradition of go-anywhere Pandas. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Review

The Fiat Panda Cross is an all-wheel drive version of Fiat's city car that's been beefed up and given a whole suite of very clever traction management electronics that ought to drag it out of the tightest spots. Gnarly all-terrain tyres and an elevated ride height mean that this one has genuine off-road chops.

Background

The Fiat Panda makes a very good citycar. The key problem is, for Fiat at least, that there are any number of other urban scoots that do much the same. Why would you choose a Panda over, say, a Peugeot 108 or a Volkswagen up! or even a Hyundai i10? Yes, the image of studied Latin nonchalance might appeal and a base Panda sitting outside a Soho espresso bar would probably be cooler than any of the aforementioned alternatives, but where the Panda really shines, where it really becomes something special is when it sends drive to all four wheels. It may not have escaped your attention that Fiat already sells a Panda 4x4, so you might be wondering what exactly is the requirement for the car we look at here, the Panda Cross. Think of it as a Panda 4x4 plus ten per cent. It's more capable, more hardcore and just more of everything. It's what a 108, an up! or an i10 could never be.

Driving Experience

The engines that power the Panda Cross are almost identical to those found under the bonnets of Panda 4x4s, albeit with a few more horsepower to call upon. Where the TwinAir 0.9-litre petrol unit manages 85bhp in a 4x4, it develops 90bhp at 5,500rpm in the Cross, while the 1.3-litre MultiJet petrol engine sees its peak power boosted from 75bhp to 80bhp in this guise. The main difference between the 4x4 and the Cross is the latter's standard 'Torque-on-Demand' transmission system. This utilises the vehicle's Electronic Locking Differential and Electronic Stability Control systems to manage the engine's torque delivery in difficult driving conditions. It's controlled by the Terrain Control selector, which offers the driver three driving modes. 'Auto' offers an automatic distribution of drive between the front and rear axles according to the available grip, 'Lock' keeps the vehicle in full-time four-wheel drive at speeds of up to 30mph, distributing torque by braking slipping wheels and thus transferring the drive to those with the most grip. Finally 'Hill Descent' is fairly self-explanatory. The chunky all-season 185/65R15 tyres help sniff out grip where none seems available and the generous ground clearance (16cm for the MultiJet II version and 15cm for the TwinAir model) combine with very good approach and departure angles to give the Cross surprising clambering abilities.

Design and Build

The Panda Cross looks anything but the suburban, cutesy Panda. In fact, the front end looks a bit bitey. There's a lot of styling going on here, from the revised light clusters, the Cross-specific bumper assembly, the front fog lights punched into a melange of mouldings, skid plates and Panda-themed 'squircles'. LED daytime running lights are built into the skid plates. Aside from the increased ride height, you might also clock the smart burnished metal finish 15-inch alloy wheels that offer more than a nod to the design of the classic TSW Venom rims of the Nineties. There are also satin titanium effect roof rails and moving to the rear, you'll also spy the beefier bumper and underbody protection, chrome tail pipe and bright red tow hooks.

Market and Model

Fiat has clearly aimed some budget at the cabin of the Panda Cross, with an interesting fabric/eco-leather seating finish and a dashboard that features a copper effect. Standard equipment includes a leather-trimmed steering wheel with stereo and phone controls, a leather-trimmed gear lever, automatic climate control, Blue&Me Bluetooth connectivity, electrically-adjustable door mirrors, a height-adjustable driver's seat and that Terrain Control selector. City Brake Control, which has was given special recognition at the 'Euro NCAP Advanced 2013' awards, is available as an option. This system recognises the presence of other vehicles or obstacles in front of the car, braking automatically if the driver fails to intervene directly to avoid a collision or mitigate its consequences at speeds of up to 18.6mph.

Cost of Ownership

Fuel economy of both engines is identical to the Panda 4x4, despite the additional horsepower. The TwinAir will net an average of 57.6mpg, which isn't too bad for a high-riding petrol-engined hatch, although the real-world versus published economy figures of this engine have often been wildly discordant. Go for the MultiJet diesel and you will probably get proportionately closer to its claimed 60.1mpg figure. Emissions are also fairly good although the Panda Cross probably isn't the city car to choose if you want really standout figures. The TwinAir records a figure of 114g/km while the diesel is actually a little worse at 125g/km. As with all Pandas, residual values will doubtless hold up fairly well.

Summary

It's hard not to love the Fiat Panda Cross. On the face of it, a go-anywhere citycar seems faintly ridiculous; one of those pointless symbols of urban one-upmanship. Then you think about it a bit more and it makes all kinds of sense. If you live in the sticks and need genuine all-weather ability, what options are there other than hulking SUVs? Yes, there's a Suzuki Jimny but if you want something that feels as if it could survive a head-on with a badger without putting you in a wheelchair, the Panda Cross looks a ready made answer. Even if you're not already digging in for winter, the Panda Cross offers affordable fun for those who might just want to do a bit of green-laning of a weekend. I suspect this one will outsell even Fiat's most optimistic forecasts. If you want something that's fun and isn't going to put your driving licence at risk, the Panda Cross offers a genuine alternative.

ANIMAL MAGIC (new2) 18/01/2013

In third generation form, Fiat's Panda is not only cuter but more sensible than ever. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Review

In third generation form, Fiat's Panda aims at being all the car some buyers will ever need. It's larger where it matters, yet still small enough for its urban purpose. It's more efficient, yet can offer surprising reserves of performance. And you can make it high-tech - or specify one that's super-affordable. The Italians have always done this kind of thing very well. They still do.

Background

Almost every car you can think of on the market can be pigeonholed into a specific market segment. And even if it can't be, it's likely to appeal to a very specific group of customers. The Panda's different. Though sized and priced as a little citycar, it's so versatile and class-less that it can really function as.... well, almost anything you want. Depending on the flavour you choose, it's a design as suited to city living as it is to the needs of a mountaintop farmer. It can be a hot hatch - or eco-conscious transport for Friends of the Earth. It can be a second vehicle for older empty-nesters. Or the sole car for a rural family. Less a citycar. More an 'essential' car, it is, in the words of one top Fiat executive 'the official car for doing whatever the hell you like'. This is the Italian brand at its very best. This MK2 design dates back to 2003, but other small cars are only just getting round to matching its astonishing efficiency of space. And just as they do, along comes this MK3 model, longer, wider, taller, more efficient and in every way cleverer than before. Functional, solid, intelligent and free spirited, it's still, we're told, a car that thinks outside the box. Let's try it.

Driving Experience

There are three main engine choices for Panda people, an entry-level 69bhp petrol 1.2-litre unit, an 85bhp 0.9-litre petrol TwinAir powerplant and, on the top 4x4 variants, a 1.3-litre 95bhp Multijet diesel. Aside from engines and performance, there's plenty else for previous Panda people to appreciate in this third generation design. For a start, there's much more of a 'big car' feel to the way that it drives, thanks to suspension tweaks, greater torsional stiffness and a wider track. The result is that it turns into corners more sharply, rounding them with far less bodyroll than before, an experience aided by greater sensitivity from the electric power steering. It's a great deal quieter than before on major routes at cruising speeds too - in fact, Fiat says that cabin noise has been halved so you can have a proper conversation with someone while cruising at the legal limit. And that's something that makes you far more likely to want to take on a longer journey. As for the rest, well as before, many of the underpinnings are shared with those of Fiat's other, more fashion-conscious citycar offering, the 500 - which is no bad thing as that car is a pretty fun steer, especially in an urban environment. Somewhere this Panda is just as at home. True, the five-speed gearbox could be a little more precise, but you'll appreciate the way this car now takes even the nastier small urban bumps in its stride. And delivers neat little touches like the steering's 'City' mode option to increase the assistance it gives at parking speeds so that you can use the tight 9.3m turning circle more easily. Urban-friendly through and through you see. Mind you, country types can also consider a Panda by looking at the endearing 4x4 version, offered with 0.9-litre petrol TwinAir or 1.3-litre Multijet diesel power.

Design and Build

There's was something of a feeling of tiny MPV about the previous generation version of this car. There still is. It remains a tall car, with a vertical tail, a five-door-only shape and a large glass area, bigger than before (slightly longer, wider and taller) but sat upon the same wheelbase, so the roadway footprint remains basically unaltered. As for the friendly new look, it's based upon what Fiat's designers call 'a squarical' theme, rounded rectangles in vogue everywhere from the headlamps to the front air intake, from the wheelarches to that trademark extra third rearward side window. The squarical touches continue on inside. You'll find them in the instrument binnacle, on the steering wheel boss, the ventilation controls on the centre console - even on the seats where embossed rounded squares are there to better help air circulate between your body and the backrest. The dashboard itself is enveloped in a colourful frame of your choosing with a roomy storage pocket in front of the front passenger supposed to evoke a nod towards original Eighties Panda motoring. Overall then, a cabin of much higher quality than before - far nicer indeed, than you'd expect a car of this class and price to provide. Storage for bigger items is taken care of by a 225-litre boot that's significantly bigger than before. As for rear seat passenger space, well thanks to slimmer seats, it's now better and perfectly adequate for a couple of fully-sized adults.

Market and Model

You'll probably be paying somewhere in the £9,500 to £13,000 for your Panda, once you've allowed for a few well-chosen extras. You could pay as much as £18,000 for a top 4x4 version though. Think carefully about whether you really need to pay the £1,200 premium to graduate from the entry-level 8v 1.2-litre petrol model to a car like the 85bhp turbo TwinAir petrol variant. Many customers will be better off sticking with the entry-level model and spending any remaining funds on some well chosen extras. If you're looking at the 4x4 models, then you'll need to factor in a premium over around £2,700 over similarly specified 'Lounge' models equipped with the same engine. I'd want to consider the Low Speed Collision Mitigation system. This uses a laser sensor on the windscreen to scan a space a short distance in front of the vehicle to determine the risk of a collision. If a potential crash situation is detected and the driver doesn't respond, the system can activate emergency braking at speeds of less than 18mph or if you're going faster, at least slow the car down to minimise the impact. Clever. As for safety, well it's disappointing to find ESP stability control only offered as an option, though when you do specify it, you also get a Hill Holder clutch that stops you drifting backwards on uphill junctions.

Cost of Ownership

You'd certainly expect this Panda to be at or near the top of its class when it comes to the issue of running costs. That's asking a little bit much of the entry-level 8v 1.2-litre 69bhp petrol engine: it is, after all, one of Fiat's older units. Still you can expect to see 57.6mpg on the combined cycle and 113g/km of CO2, which isn't too far off the kind of returns you get from rivals with more modern powerplants. Where this Fiat really scores though, is if you're able to stretch to a version with petrol TwinAir power. The 85bhp Panda TwinAir we tried doesn't require a diesel premium to buy and runs on petrol yet despite its pokey performance, manages 67.3mpg on the combined cycle while putting out just 99g/km of CO2. Go for a 4x4 model with this engine and those figures take quite a hit - down to 57.6mpg and 114g/km. With the 4x4 1.3-litre 95bhp Multijet diesel version, the figures are 64.2mpg and 117g/km. Both TwinAir and Multijet buyers get a Start&Stop system that cuts the engine when you're stuck in traffic or waiting at the lights. And a gearshift indicator to help you with optimum change-up points.

Summary

Loved by small car people the world over for more than thirty years, the Panda continues to define everything that a very compact multi-purpose model should be. It's had to evolve of course, with more efficient engines and clever technology. But its heart remains simple, functional and innovative. Which is why, while other citycars will please only citycar folk, you could imagine this one being bought by.... well, just about anyone. A few other rivals may be a little cheaper, more refined or slightly trendier but few push the boundaries of design quite like this Fiat. It happily challenges just about every tiny car perception in the book. That you can't get really impressive fuel and CO2 figures without forking out loads of money for a diesel. That you can't seat five in this class of car. Or carry really large items. Or get big car hi-tech features. Panda people think differently thanks to a car that lets them do just that. It's got tough competition these days, no question. But in a growing segment full of talented offerings, it's a key contender you just can't help liking.

HOT IN THE CITY (family) 18/01/2013

Fiat's little Panda range still has a funky charm. June Neary reports

Will It Suit Me?

The original first generation Fiat Panda was always a favourite of mine back in the Nineties and served me very well during my student days. I knew today's model couldn't match the 'back to basics' appeal of the Giugiaro styled original, but times have changed and so have the demands of modern motorists. Seats that resemble hammocks just won't cut it in a market of growing sophistication. The current Panda may be linked to the original in name only, but it has proved to be an enduring favourite. The shape is cheeky without lapsing into cutesy pastiche and overall, this remains a car that's virtually impossible to dislike.

Practicalities

The term 'citycar' usually denotes a vehicle that's cramped, insubstantial and rather uncomfortable to drive. The Panda is a long way from this stereotype. Despite measuring only 3,653mm from bumper to bumper, the Panda offers a decent amount of interior space, helped by a generous height of 1,551mm and that wheel at each corner design. There's was something of a feeling of tiny MPV about the previous generation version of this model. There still is. It remains a tall car, with a vertical tail, a five-door-only shape and a large glass area Room up front is fine for two big adults, but rear legroom will naturally be a little pinched if four burly blokes squeeze in. Still, for two adults and two children it works very well. The dashboard is enveloped in a colourful frame of your choosing with a roomy storage pocket in front of the front passenger supposed to evoke a nod towards original Eighties Panda motoring. Luggage space is adequate (225-litres), access to the hatch being helped by a very low loading sill. A split folding rear bench helps when transporting long or bulky items.

Behind the Wheel

Three engines are offered, opening with the entry-level 1.2-litre 69hp petrol powerplant for those on a tight budget. Few will regret shelling out a few hundred pounds extra for the more powerful 85hp 0.9-litre turbo TwinAir unit. There's also a 95bhp 1.3-litre Multijet diesel engine - but only in the 4x4 models at the top of the range. Many of the underpinnings are shared with those of Fiat's other, more fashion-conscious citycar offering, the 500 - which is no bad thing as that car is a pretty fun steer, especially in an urban environment. Somewhere this Panda is just as at home. True, the five-speed gearbox could be a little more precise, but you'll appreciate the way this car takes even the nastier small urban bumps in its stride. And delivers neat little touches like the steering's 'City' mode option to increase the assistance it gives at parking speeds so that you can use the tight 9.3m turning circle more easily. Urban-friendly through and through you see.

Value For Money

Prices start at around £9,500 for the base 'Pop' model - a lot less, in other words, than you'd pay for the less spacious but more fashionable Fiat 500. Running costs are minimal - though not as sharp as rivals. The 1.2-litre variant manages 55.4mpg on the combined cycle and 119g/km of CO2. I'd want to consider the Low Speed Collision Mitigation system. This uses a laser sensor on the windscreen to scan a space a short distance in front of the vehicle to determine the risk of a collision. If a potential crash situation is detected and the driver doesn't respond, the system can activate emergency braking at speeds of less than 18mph or if you're going faster, at least slow the car down to minimise the impact. Clever.

Could I Live With One?

Despite a flurry of more recent arrivals in the city car sector, there's still little to match the Panda's space and value combination. Considering the affordable pricing, Fiat have specified the car very well and crucially, it's fun to drive. Few cars are as instantly likeable.

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