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Fiat Panda 1.2 City Cross 5dr Hatchback (2017) at Bolton Motor Park Abarth, Fiat and Mazda

01204 910 361

£7,350

WAS £8,500, SAVE £1,150

Fitted with Bluetooth radio, USB and Aux (4 speakers), Automatic climate control, Front Fog lights, 15-inch off road alloy wheels, Adjustable Leather steering wheel withaudio controls, Remote control central door locking, Dualdrive power steering, Luggage compartment light, Electrically adjustable heated door mirrors, roof bars, Front and rear bumper with body coloured, skid plate, Body coloured side mouldings with, Cross logo Mould, 6 airbags and much more!

23/09/2017

15588

Manual

Petrol 48.7 combined MPG

RED

New Lower Price


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Emissions and Fuel

CO2:
131 g/km

MPG:
48.7

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per mile


per week


per year

* Price does not include road fund license

Body Glass

Electric front windows, Rear wiper

Brakes

ABS/EBD, Brake assist function, ESP + ASR + hill holder

Carpets/Rugs

Floor mats

Driver Aids

Dual drive PAS

Driver Information

Outside temperature display, Trip computer

Driving Mirrors

Black door mirrors, Electric adjustable heated door mirrors

Entertainment

4 speakers, Bluetooth radio with Smartphone cradle, USB and AUX-in, Remote controls mounted on steering wheel

Exterior Body Features

Black door handles, Black roof rails, Body colour bumpers, Body colour front skid plate, Body colour rear skid plate, Body colour side mouldings, Body coloured side mouldings with cross logo, Body coloured side stripes

Exterior Lights

Front fog lights

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Auto climate control with pollen filter

Interior Features

12V socket, Adjustable leather steering wheel with audio controls, Cloth/ECO leather upholstery, Leather gear knob

Interior Lights

Front spot light with timer, Luggage compartment lighting

Safety

Anti-whiplash front headrests, Driver airbag, Front passenger airbag, Side airbags, Tyre pressure monitoring system, Window airbags

Seats

3 point rear seatbelts(3)+3 rear head restraints, 5 seat with 40/60 split folding rear seat and 3 head restraints, Height adjustable driver's seat, Isofix attachments on rear seats

Security

Immobiliser, Remote central locking

Vanity Mirrors

Driver's sun visor with vanity mirror, Passenger sunvisor with vanity mirror

Wheels

Summer tyres

Wheels - Alloy

15" Off road alloy wheels

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.2
Badge Power: 69
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: N
Coin Series: City Cross
Generation Mark: 3
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 6U
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 8
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 45
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 16
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 0
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 47
NCAP Safety Assist %: 7
Service Interval Frequency - Months: N
Service Interval Mileage: 12000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 999999
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: N
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: N
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 131
HC+NOx: N
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: SOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1242
Compression Ratio: 11.1:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 70.8
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 78.9
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: MULTI POINT FUEL INJECTION
Gears: 5 SPEED
Number of Valves: 8
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 48.7
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 57.6
EC Urban (mpg): 39.2
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb: 7
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb - Max: 7
WLTP - FC (l/100km) - Comb - Min: 6.3
WLTP - MPG - Comb: 40.4
WLTP - MPG - Comb - Max: 40.4
WLTP - MPG - Comb - Min: 44.8

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 14.8
Engine Power - BHP: 69
Engine Power - KW: 51
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 5500
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 75
Engine Torque - MKG: 10.4
Engine Torque - NM: 102
Engine Torque - RPM: 3000
Top Speed: 102

Test Cycles

Emissions Test Cycle: NEDC Correlated

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 185/65 R15
Tyre Size Rear: 185/65 R15
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: N
Wheel Type: 15" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1635
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 3653
Wheelbase: 2300
Width: 1662
Width (including mirrors): 1882

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 35
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1515
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 870
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 225
Max. Loading Weight: 425
Max. Roof Load: 55
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 800
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 400
Minimum Kerbweight: 1090
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 9.7

TO BOLDLY GO (new2) 24/05/2013

The Fiat Panda City Cross offers 4x4 looks in a more affordable guise and now includes mild hybrid power. Jonathan Crouch takes a look.

Ten Second Review

Although it could be accused of being all show and no go, the front-wheel drive Fiat Panda City Cross is too likeable to damn with such a verdict. In fact, it emerges as something surprisingly appealing. Especially in this new mild hybrid form.

Background

The Fiat Panda 4x4 you've probably heard of. It's a bit of a minor cult car. The Fiat Panda City Cross? This one's a bit more of an unknown quantity, but stick with us because it's a good 'un. The elephant in the room first. Despite looking ostensibly similar to the Panda 4x4, the City Cross only directs drive to its front wheels. That might well be enough to deter a few people who will immediately label it inauthentic, but those of you with less dogmatic standpoints might like to give it a chance. It almost seems a model out of time. A few years ago there was a big boom in this sort of car. We had the Rover Streetwise, the Volkswagen Polo Dune and the Citroen C3 XTR to name but a few. These have all proved to be an evolutionary dead end for their manufacturers yet if anyone could be relied on to make the genre work, it's Fiat. With good reason too.

Driving Experience

The Panda 4x4 looks of this City Cross model suggest that light off road prowess is possible. A glance at the still-restricted ride height though, confirms that this is very definitely not the case. Still, if looks are everything, then this variant will certainly stand out on the school run. Unlike the 85hp two cylinder TwinAir engine used by the Panda 4x4, this Cross model uses a mild hybrid 70hp 1.0-litre three cylinder petrol engine, this unit replacing the aging 69hp 1.2-litre conventional four cylinder powerplant that this Panda Cross has been soldiering on with since launch. The mild hybrid powerplant improves fuel efficiency without impeding performance. It also ensures a very high standard of driving comfort thanks to a 12-volt 'BSG' 'Belt-integrated Starter Generator', allowing for a quiet, vibration-free restart of the internal combustion engine in Stop&Start mode. The engine (which in conventional form we've already seen in the 500X SUV) puts out 92Nm of pulling power and works via a 6-speed manual gearbox inegrated with that 'BSG' set-up we just mentioned. The 'BSG' system is mounted directly on the engine and is operated by the belt that also drives the auxiliaries. The new system also involves lowering the entire power unit 45mm so the car behaves better on the road thanks to the lower centre of gravity. Like any other Panda, this one's especially at home in a city environment. True, the five-speed gearbox could be a little more precise, but you'll appreciate the way this car takes even quite nasty small urban bumps in its stride. And delivers neat little touches like the steering's 'City' mode option to increase the assistance it gives at parking speeds so that you can use the tight 9.3m turning circle more easily. Urban-friendly through and through you see.

Design and Build

The Panda City Cross certainly looks the part, although you'd have to give it a bit of a forensic examination to distinguish it from the full-fat 4x4 Cross variant. This model comes with body-coloured front and rear bumper inserts and side mouldings, plus contrasting black for the door mirror caps, roof bars and door handles. Completing the off-road look are the same 15-inch alloy wheels that can be found on the Panda Cross. Inside, the City Cross features a grey dashboard fascia with matt black instrument panel inserts and smarter seats, characterised by black and grey fabric with black eco-leather side inserts. Otherwise, the design is much as it would be in any other Panda, based upon what Fiat's designers call 'a squarical' theme, rounded rectangles in vogue everywhere from the headlamps to the front air intake, from the wheelarches to that trademark extra third rearward side window. The squarical touches continue on inside. You'll find them in the instrument binnacle, on the steering wheel boss and on the ventilation controls. The dashboard can be enveloped in a colourful frame of your choosing, with a roomy storage pocket in front of the front passenger supposed to evoke a nod towards original Eighties Panda motoring. As for rear seat passenger space, well thanks to slimmer seats, it's perfectly adequate for a couple of fully-sized adults. Storage for big items is taken care of by a 225-litre boot. That's one of the largest luggage compartments in the city car segment.

Market and Model

Getting your Panda dressed up like this doesn't come cheap. The cost of this City Cross Mild Hybrid 1.0 model is around £14,000. That makes this variant about £3,500 more han a base Panda 'Pop' 1.2-litre derivative. Even the most luxurious Panda 'Lounge' version costs nearly £2,500 less. Perhaps it's more relevant to point out that a full-fat Panda Cross 4x4 costs around £3,000 more - though as well as AWD, that car does feature a pokier and more economic 0.9-litre TwinAir 85bhp turbo petrol engine. If you do want the City Cross derivative, you might want to know that a better-equipped 'Style Pack' variant is available for £500 more. This adds ultrashine roofbars, side mouldings and a skid plate as well as body coloured door mirrors and front red hooks, to bring it in line with the Panda Cross. Inside, the City Cross style pack includes an upgraded copper dashboard and panels and seat upholstery to match its four-wheel-drive sibling. Options include side airbags and three rear seatbelts.

Cost of Ownership

One of the advantages of such a small car is that tiny fuel efficient engines are more than adequate for hauling you and your little Fiat around. Particularly the mild hybrid 1.0-litre 'Firefly' unit now fitted to this car. The electrified system used here recovers energy during braking and deceleration, stores it in a lithium battery with a capacity of 11Ah, and uses it, at a maximum power of 3,600W, to restart the engine in Stop&Start mode and to assist it during acceleration. This technology allows the internal combustion engine to switch off by shifting into neutral, even at speeds below 18mph. The dashboard, which displays information on the hybrid system, prompts the driver when to shift. The mild hybrid propulsion unit works with a 6-gear manual transmission aimed at improving fuel economy in out-of-town driving, thanks to new low-friction bearings and gaskets and the use of a specific high-efficiency lubricant. The official WLTP combined cycle fuel figure is 50.4mpg and there's an NEDC-rated CO2 emissions figure of 90g/km (down from 111g/km in the previous 1.2-litre Panda Cross model). What else? Well, this car should certainly be cheap to insure. The warranty is a typical three year affair but with a 100,000 mile limit that's significantly higher than some other brands will give you. Pandas hold their value very well and that's unlikely to change any time soon. The car is covered by a three-year, unlimited mileage warranty and there's 36 months of breakdown cover included as well. Servicing needn't be too costly as Fiat parts are relatively cheap. The brand also offers fixed price service plans that take care of all service charges, labour and replacement fluids. You can pick from durations that span from one to five years, with corresponding mileage from 9,000 to 45,000 miles.

Summary

The Fiat Panda City Cross is easy to view cynically, but give it a chance and it more than justifies its existence. No, it's not at all capable in the rough, and nor should it be expected to be, directing drive to its front wheels only. But be honest; have you ever seen any sort of Panda 4x4 model anywhere where AWD would actually be needed? No, me neither. If you want a citycar with SUV attitude, the Panda City Cross might make sense, particularly now that Fiat has favoured it with its 1.0-litre Mild Hybrid tech. File this one under 'surprisingly likeable'.

ANIMAL MAGIC (new2) 18/01/2013

Fiat's Panda gets mild hybrid tech and remains cute and sensible. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Review

Fiat's Panda aims at being all the car some buyers will ever need. It's large where it matters, yet still small enough for its urban purpose. It's more efficient - especially in its latest 1.0-litre mild hybrid form - yet can offer surprising reserves of performance. And you can make it high-tech - or specify one that's super-affordable. The Italians have always done this kind of thing very well. They still do.

Background

Almost every car you can think of on the market can be pigeonholed into a specific market segment. And even if it can't be, it's likely to appeal to a very specific group of customers. The Fiat Panda's different. Though sized and priced as a little citycar, it's so versatile and class-less that it can really function as.... well, almost anything you want. Depending on the flavour you choose, it's a design as suited to city living as it is to the needs of a mountaintop farmer. It can be a hot hatch - or eco-conscious transport for Friends of the Earth. It can be a second vehicle for older empty-nesters. Or the sole car for a rural family. Less a citycar. More an 'essential' car, it is, in the words of one top Fiat executive 'the official car for doing whatever the hell you like'. This is the Italian brand at its very best. A modern-era MK2 Panda design was launched back in 2003 to replace a first generation model that sold for over twenty years from 1980. The MK3 design we've got here was originally launched back in 2011, but in early 2020 was significantly updated with the option of 1.0-litre mild hybrid power; it's this improved Panda that we're going to take a look at here. Functional, solid, intelligent and free spirited, it's still, we're told, a car that thinks outside the box. Let's try it.

Driving Experience

There are three main engine choices for Panda people, an entry-level 69bhp petrol 1.2-litre unit for the standard models and a 70hp 1.0-litre mild hybrid three cylinder engine for mainstream 'Cross' variants. Standard and 'Cross' versions of the top 4x4 derivative continue with the brand's two cylinder 85hp TwinAir petrol unit. Going forward, Fiat expects the majority of sales to be of the mild hybrid powerplant, which improves fuel efficiency without impeding performance. It also ensures a very high standard of driving comfort thanks to a 12-volt 'BSG' 'Belt-integrated Starter Generator', allowing for a quiet, vibration-free restart of the internal combustion engine in Stop&Start mode. The engine (which we've already seen in Fiat's alternative citycar, the 500) puts out 92Nm of pulling power and works via a 6-speed manual gearbox inegrated with that 'BSG' set-up we just mentioned. The 'BSG' system is mounted directly on the engine and is operated by the belt that also drives the auxiliaries. The new system also involves lowering the entire power unit 45mm so the car behaves better on the road thanks to the lower centre of gravity. Like any other Panda, this one's especially at home in a city environment. True, the five-speed gearbox could be a little more precise, but you'll appreciate the way this car takes even quite nasty small urban bumps in its stride. And delivers neat little touches like the steering's 'City' mode option to increase the assistance it gives at parking speeds so that you can use the tight 9.3m turning circle more easily. Urban-friendly through and through you see.

Design and Build

There's was something of a feeling of tiny MPV about the previous 2003-era MK2 generation version of this car, something that was carried over to this third generation model. It remains a tall car, with a vertical tail, a five-door-only shape and a large glass area, bigger than its predecessor (slightly longer, wider and taller) but sat upon the same wheelbase, so the roadway footprint remains basically unaltered. As for the friendly look, it's based upon what Fiat's designers call 'a squarical' theme, rounded rectangles in vogue everywhere from the headlamps to the front air intake, from the wheelarches to that trademark extra third rearward side window. The squarical touches continue on inside. You'll find them in the instrument binnacle, on the steering wheel boss, the ventilation controls on the centre console - even on the seats where embossed rounded squares are there to better help air circulate between your body and the backrest. The dashboard itself is enveloped in a colourful frame of your choosing with a roomy storage pocket in front of the front passenger supposed to evoke a nod towards original Eighties Panda motoring. Overall then, this is a cabin of reasonable quality given the affordable asking prices - far nicer indeed, than you'd expect a car of this class and price to provide. Storage for bigger items is taken care of by a 225-litre boot that's square and usefully shaped. As for rear seat passenger space, well thanks to the slim seats, it's perfectly adequate for a couple of fully-sized adults.

Market and Model

There are two Panda body styles, the standard one and the more Crossover-orientated 'Cross' variants. In both cases, there's a 4x4 variant powered by an 89hp two cylinder TwinAir engine at the top of the range, but it's the 'Cross' models you'll have to have if you want the brand's latest 1.0-litre mild hybrid petrol engine. That partly accounts for why the entry-level price point for a 'Cross' model (nearly £14,000 for the 'City Cross' derivative) is so much higher than the starting point for the standard models (priced from not much more than £10,000), most of which continue on with the brand's older-tech 1.2-litre 69hp petrol engine. Standard models with this unit are available in 'Pop', 'Easy' or 'Lounge' guises, while the 'Cross' variants come in 'City Cross', 'Launch Edition' and 'Trusadi' forms. Whatever Panda derivative you end up choosing, you'll find it'll come with air conditioning. The 'Easy' version of the standard mode gets roof rails, while 'Lounge'-spec gets you 15-inch alloy wheels and front fog lights. The standard 4x4 variant gets 15-inch dark metal alloy wheels, raised suspension and special 4x4 styling. The 'City Cross' version comes with 15-inch alloy wheels, climate control and black roof bars. And with the top Panda Cross 4x4, you get an All terrain selector driving mode system and rear differential gear locking that will take you further off the beaten track.

Cost of Ownership

You'd certainly expect this Panda to be at or near the top of its class when it comes to the issue of running costs. That's asking a little bit much of the entry-level 8v 1.2-litre 69bhp petrol engine: it is, after all, one of Fiat's older units. Still you can expect to see 44.1mpg on the WLTP combined cycle and 111g/km of NEDC-rated CO2, which isn't too far off the kind of returns you get from rivals with more modern powerplants. For the 1.0-litre mild hybrid Cross model, the official WLTP combined cycle fuel figure is 50.4mpg and there's an NEDC-rated CO2 emissions figure of 90g/km. For the TwinAir 4x4 variant, you're looking at 37.7mpg and 129g/km. The warranty is a typical three year affair but with a 100,000 mile limit that's significantly higher than some other brands will give you. Pandas hold their value very well and that's unlikely to change any time soon. The car is covered by a three-year, unlimited mileage warranty and there's 36 months of breakdown cover included as well. Servicing needn't be too costly as Fiat parts are relatively cheap. The brand also offers fixed price service plans that take care of all service charges, labour and replacement fluids. You can pick from durations that span from one to five years, with corresponding mileage from 9,000 to 45,000 miles.

Summary

Loved by small car people the world over for more than thirty years, the Panda continues to define everything that a very compact multi-purpose model should be. It's had to evolve of course, with more efficient engines and clever technology. But its heart remains simple, functional and innovative. Which is why, while other citycars will please only citycar folk, you could imagine this one being bought by.... well, just about anyone. A few other rivals may be a little cheaper, more refined or slightly trendier but few push the boundaries of design quite like this Fiat. It happily challenges just about every tiny car perception in the book. That you can't get really impressive fuel and CO2 figures without forking out loads of money for a diesel. That you can't seat five in this class of car. Or carry really large items. Or get big car hi-tech features. Panda people think differently thanks to a car that lets them do just that. It's got tough competition these days, no question. But in a growing segment full of talented offerings, it's a key contender you just can't help liking.

HOT IN THE CITY (family) 01/02/2020

Fiat's little Panda range still has a funky charm. June Neary reports

Will It Suit Me?

The original first generation Fiat Panda was always a favourite of mine back in the Nineties and served me very well during my student days. I knew today's model couldn't match the 'back to basics' appeal of the Giugiaro styled original, but times have changed and so have the demands of modern motorists. Seats that resemble hammocks just won't cut it in a market of growing sophistication. The current Panda may be linked to the original in name only, but it has proved to be an enduring favourite. The shape is cheeky without lapsing into cutesy pastiche and overall and the latest version gains efficient mild hybrid engine tech. Overall, this remains a car that's virtually impossible to dislike.

Practicalities

The term 'city car' usually denotes a vehicle that's cramped, insubstantial and rather uncomfortable to drive. The Panda is a long way from this stereotype. Despite measuring only 3,653mm from bumper to bumper, this Fiat offers a decent amount of interior space, helped by a generous height of 1,551mm and that wheel at each corner design. There's was something of a feeling of tiny MPV about the previous generation version of this model. There still is. It remains a tall car, with a vertical tail, a five-door-only shape and a large glass area. Room up front is fine for two big adults, but rear legroom will naturally be a little pinched if four burly blokes squeeze in. Still, for two adults and two children it works very well. The dashboard is enveloped in a colourful frame of your choosing with a roomy storage pocket in front of the front passenger supposed to evoke a nod towards original Eighties Panda motoring. Luggage space is adequate (225-litres), access to the hatch being helped by a very low loading sill. A split folding rear bench helps when transporting long or bulky items.

Behind the Wheel

The latest 1.0-litre mild hybrid petrol engine has decent pulling power and works via a 6-speed manual gearbox integrated with a 12-volt 'BSG' 'Belt-integrated Starter Generator', allowing for a quiet, vibration-free restart of the internal combustion engine in Stop&Start mode. The new system also involves lowering the entire power unit 45mm so the car behaves better on the road thanks to the lower centre of gravity. Elsewhere in the range, the old entry-level 69bhp petrol 1.2-litre petrol unit continues. And standard and 'Cross' versions of the top 4x4 derivative persevere with the brand's two cylinder 85hp TwinAir petrol unit. Many of this Fiat's underpinnings are shared with those of the brand's other, more fashion-conscious citycar offering, the 500 - which is no bad thing as that car is a pretty fun steer, especially in an urban environment. Somewhere this Panda is just as at home. True, the five-speed gearbox could be a little more precise, but you'll appreciate the way this car takes even the nastier small urban bumps in its stride. And delivers neat little touches like the steering's 'City' mode option to increase the assistance it gives at parking speeds so that you can use the tight 9.3m turning circle more easily. Urban-friendly through and through you see.

Value For Money

Prices start at around £10,000 for the base 'Pop' model - a lot less, in other words, than you'd pay for the less spacious but more fashionable Fiat 500. Running costs are minimal - though not as sharp as rivals. The 1.0-litre mild hybrid variant manages 50.4mpg on the WLTP combined cycle and 90g/km of NEDC-rated CO2. I'd want to consider the Low Speed Collision Mitigation system. This uses a laser sensor on the windscreen to scan a space a short distance in front of the vehicle to determine the risk of a collision. If a potential crash situation is detected and the driver doesn't respond, the system can activate emergency braking at speeds of less than 18mph or if you're going faster, at least slow the car down to minimise the impact. Clever.

Could I Live With One?

Despite a flurry of more recent arrivals in the city car sector, there's still little to match the Panda's space and value combination. Considering the affordable pricing, Fiat have specified the car very well and crucially, it's fun to drive. Few cars are as instantly likeable.

Fiat Panda average rating: 4.5/5 (11 reviews)

- 02/04/2017, owner of a Fiat Panda Hatchback 1.2 Easy 5dr

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
I am perfectly happy with my new Panda Easy, just perfect for my needs.

- 04/04/2017, owner of a Fiat Panda Hatchback 1.2 Lounge

User rating: 4/5

User comment:
Easy to drive, nice car, no problems.

- 24/03/2017, owner of a Fiat Panda Hatchback 1.2 Pop 5dr - 2017

User rating: 4.5/5

User comment:
Fiat Panda is a very complete car for our needs, far better equipped than a lot of its competitors, very economical, low road tax, a tried and tested engine over many years. Our second Panda Pop. Salesman Dion Stagg was very professional without being overpowering would recommend him personally.

Read all Fiat Panda Reviews

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