Honda CR-V 2.0 i-VTEC SE 5dr 2WD MPV (2013) available from Maidstone Suzuki, Honda and Mazda

This vehicle is currently in stock at Mazda Northampton Motors and can be purchased from Maidstone Suzuki, Honda and Mazda.

01622 914 995

£9,000

WAS £9,800, SAVE £800

Long Journeys are easy with Cruise Control, plus this CR-V comes with Rear Parking Sensors, Electric Windows, Air Conditioning, Front Fog Lights, Steering Wheel Mounted Audio Controls, and a CD / Radio with AM / FM.

03/01/2013

57059

Manual

Petrol

RED



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Body Glass

Electric front/rear windows, Rain sensor, Rear wiper

Brakes

ABS/EBD, Brake assist, Hill start assist

Chassis/Suspension

Vehicle stability assist

Communication

Bluetooth hands free telephone connection

Driver Aids

Cruise control, Electric power steering, Front and rear parking sensors, Rear view camera, Speed limiter

Driver Information

Intelligent multi info display, Service interval indicator

Driving Mirrors

Aspheric door mirrors, Auto dimming rear view mirror, Door mirrors tilt when reversing, Electrically adjustable and heated door mirrors, Electrically retractable door mirrors

Embellishment Trims

Brushed alloy inlays

Entertainment

6 speakers, Auxiliary socket for external device, DAB audio, Steering wheel mounted controls, Stereo radio/CD player, USB/iPod connection

Exterior Body Features

Body colour bumpers, Body colour door handles

Exterior Lights

Automatic headlights with dusk sensor, Daytime running lights, Front fog lights, Welcome home function

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Dual zone automatic climate control

Interior Features

Accessory sockets, Cargo hooks, Chrome interior door handles, Cloth upholstery, Front centre armrest, Illuminated glovebox, Leather steering wheel and gear knob, Passenger armrest, Rear centre armrest, Sunglasses holder, Tilt/telescopic adjust steering wheel, Tonneau cover

Interior Lights

Ambient interior lighting, Boot light, Courtesy lights, Front map lights, Illuminated ignition switch

Safety

5 x 3 point seatbelts, Active front headrests, Deflation detection system, Driver/Front Passenger airbags, Front and rear curtain airbags, Front side airbags, Passenger airbag deactivate switch, Seatbelt warning

Seats

60/40 split folding rear seat, Driver's electric adjustable lumbar support, Front seatback pocket, Height adjustable driver's seat, Isofix child seat preparation, Rear headrests

Security

Honda super locks, Immobiliser, Remote central locking with 2 remote folding keys, Security alarm, Ultrasonic alarm

Towing

Trailer stability assist

Vanity Mirrors

Driver/passenger sunvisors with illuminated vanity mirrors

Wheels - Spare

Temporary spare wheel

General

Badge Engine CC: 2.0
Badge Power: 155
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: i-VTEC
Coin Series: SE
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 24E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 93
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 74
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 5
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 68
NCAP Safety Assist %: 66
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 90000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 168
Noise Level dB(A): 64.5
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 5

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: SOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1997
Compression Ratio: 10.6:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 81
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 96.9
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: MULTI POINT FUEL INJECTION
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 39.2
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 45.6
EC Urban (mpg): 31.7

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 10
Engine Power - BHP: 155
Engine Power - KW: 114
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 6500
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 142
Engine Torque - MKG: 20
Engine Torque - NM: 192
Engine Torque - RPM: 4300
Top Speed: 118

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Space Saver?: True
Tyre Size Front: 225/65 R17
Tyre Size Rear: 225/65 R17
Tyre Size Spare: SPACE SAVER
Wheel Style: N
Wheel Type: 17" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1685
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 4570
Wheelbase: 2630
Width: 1820
Width (including mirrors): 2095

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 58
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1955
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1669
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 589
Max. Loading Weight: 499
Max. Roof Load: 80
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 1700
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 600
Minimum Kerbweight: 1456
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 11.8

SUBURBAN WARFARE (new2) 03/08/2018

In fifth generation form, Honda's CR-V is a quality family-sized SUV that really benefits from a quarter of a century of continuous improvement. Jonathan Crouch reports

Ten Second Review

Honda's fifth generation CR-V has evolved into something cleverer, classier and more efficient. Changes to the body structure and the optional 4WD system mean that handling's significantly more involving than it was before and the mainstream 1.5-litre VTEC TURBO petrol engine that features this time round is much more efficient. Hybrid technology also makes an appearance and customers can specify a seven-seat variant for the first time too.

Background

How do you right a best seller? This is Honda's answer, the fifth generation version of a mid-sized SUV soft-roading CR-V model that has frequently been the strongest selling car of its kind in the world. In the past, this hasn't been a model that's jumped out at you from the spec sheet. No. You have to drive it. Use it. Fill it with family. Many of those experienced in doing just that probably won't even look at the alternatives before replacing their second, third or fourth generation CR-Vs with this MK5 model. It does, after all, offer a depth of engineering that many other rivals just don't have. Honda hopes that this will stand the CR-V in good stead - and not only against the volume brand mid-sized Qashqai-class SUVs it's traditionally competed against. The brand intends that this CR-V should also feature on the wish lists of buyers looking at premium brand models in this segment. Is that a realistic goal? That's what we're here to find out.

Driving Experience

To begin with the range is mainly based around a 1.5-litre, VTEC TURBO four-cylinder petrol unit available in two states of tune, with either 170 or 190bhp. Alternatively, you can talk to your dealer about an alternative petrol electric hybrid version. Most though, will want the standard 1.5 VTEC TURBO powerplant, which with 170hp comes in manual form with two or four-wheel drive. The more potent 190hp derivative comes only with a CVT auto transmission and 4WD. The 4x4 set-up - Honda calls it 'Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control System' - is much improved, with an ability to send up to 60% of torque to the rear wheels when required, particularly during a hill climb. Through revisions to the calibration, the system also offers more dynamic cornering performance though feedback from the yaw rate and steering sensors. Honda also says that the electric power steering set-up has been re-tuned for extra feel. The much more rigid body this time round helps enormously here. A solid rear stabiliser bar sharpens turn-in and reduces body roll, while a new floating, rubber-mounted sub-frame structure improves noise isolation over the previous CR-V. Honda's Agile Handling Assist set-up, as seen on the Civic hatch, is fitted to the CR-V for the first time. The electronic stability system has been specially tuned for Europe to reflect typical road surface conditions and driving styles. It responds to steering inputs with subtle, discreet assistance for added safety and smoother, more predictable vehicle behaviour including stable cornering and lane change at roundabouts, both at low and high speeds.

Design and Build

Smarter, more sophisticated looks mark out this fifth generation CR-V, but as usual what's important is what lies beneath the panel work. Thanks to a comprehensive, ground-up design and engineering programme, this fifth generation CR-V features the strongest and most sophisticated chassis in the nameplate's history. A low-inertia and highly rigid platform is enabled through new body construction that uses advanced lightweight and high-tensile materials. Inside, as usual, the cabin is ergonomically spot-on - though not everyone will like the faux-wood panelling used on plusher variants. Honda has tried to improve the centre-dash infotainment screen, but it's still not as effective as rival set-ups. You're unlikely to complain about interior space though: second row passengers get lots of legroom and headroom is excellent, even if you specify the optional panoramic glass roof. The boot space is 561-litres with the second row in place, and 1756-litres with the rear seats folded flat - although if you choose that optional panoramic sunroof, you'll reduce this to 1638-litres. A key change this time round is the addition of a seven-seat variant, which offers a third seating row intended for small children. When it's erect, there's just 150-litres of luggage space behind, though that increases to 472-litres when you fold the bench into the floor. All of this is very similar to what you'd get from rival models in this segment.

Market and Model

Expect pricing to be much as before in the £26,000 to £35,500 bracket. That's a touch above the Qashqai-class crowd but a touch below what you'd pay for the premium-branded contenders in this category. Which could be tempting, given that a CR-V offers you more space than you'd get from models like Volvo's XC40 and Audi's Q3. Plus there's now a seven-seat version to compete with models like the Peugeot 5008 and the Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace. With the CR-V, 4WD is optional (costing £1,100 more) with the 170bhp engine and mandatory if you choose the 190bhp unit. There are four trim levels - 'S', 'SE', 'SR' and 'EX'. The CVT auto transmission comes only with 4WD and costs £2,310 more than the manual. Safety has been a key design consideration and, as with all Honda vehicles, the CR-V platform incorporates the brand's sophisticated 'ACE' ('Advanced Compatibility Engineering') body structure, which employs an interconnected network of front frames to absorb and deflect energy from a frontal collision. Honda's system is not only designed with 'self-protection' in mind, but also to minimise damage to other vehicles in the event of a head-on collision though its 'compatibility' engineering which absorbs crash energy and deflects it through multiple load paths around the passenger cell. In addition, as on a Civic hatch, there's the 'Honda Sensing' suite of active safety and driver assist technologies, which includes Lane Keeping Assist, Adaptive Cruise Control, Forward Collision Warning and a Collision Mitigation Braking System.

Cost of Ownership

The 190bhp petrol engine mated to CVT auto transmission manages 39.8mpg on the combined cycle and 158g/km of CO2, which is pretty class-competitive. The best emissions come from the 2WD 170bhp manual model, which puts out 143g/km. The returns of all engines are aided by the standard fitment of a stop&start system - Honda calls it 'Idle Stop' - to cut the engine when you don't need it, sitting in heavy traffic or stopped at crossings and traffic lights for example. There's also the usual gearshift indicator light on the dash and various fuel-related trip computer read-outs that'll demonstrate how successful your recent efforts at frugality have been. Insurance groups range between 24E and 25E. Residual values look set to stack up very well if the last CR-V was anything to go by. On to the warranty, a three year/90,000 mile deal, which is a bit better than most rivals who tend to offer guarantees limited to 60,000 miles. There's also a fixed-price comprehensive aftercare package called 'Five' which includes five years' servicing, five years' warranty and five years' roadside assist.

Summary

It's easy to imagine yourself as target market for a car like this CR-V. You've a couple of kids, an active lifestyle, a need to haul things around and an aversion to rather dull large estate cars. This fifth generation model is likely to be an extremely easy thing to live with, the kind of car you'll own, then wonder how you managed without. That may not be a recipe for media headlines but it's an approach that other brands could certainly learn from, explaining why so many CR-Vs are bought by folk who previously owned one. These are people who'll heartily approve of the changes that Honda has made to this MK5 model - the smarter looks, the improved engine efficiency, the classier feel and the seven-seat option for those needing it. All of these things ought to allow the CR-V to reach out beyond its traditional customer base. And probably will.

EVERYDAY EXCELLENCE (used) 13/06/2014

By Andy Enright

Introduction

Building goods that people need ought to be a fairly straightforward procedure. When it comes to cars, identify how people use their vehicles, how they want to use vehicles and build product to fit. Honda did exactly that with the CR-V. Despite huge commercial success, many sniped that the CR-V marked the suburbanisation of Honda, that a company once known for its radical and extreme engineering, for taking big risks and making headlines had somehow gone soft and middle-aged. Of course, it's not really true. Honda just became better attuned to the needs of its customers, realising that the sharpest-handling SUV was less of a draw than the SUV with the best crash protection, the slickest seating system, the best ride quality and the best record for reliability. The fourth generation CR-V debuted in early 2013 and here we run the rue over whether a used one makes the grade.

Models

5dr compact 4x4 (2.0 petrol, 1.6, 2.2 diesel [S, S-T, SE, SE-T, SR, EX, Black Edition, White Edition])

History

The CR-V is a car that has stayed true to its original concept. It is, was and has always been a vehicle that offers safe and cost-effective family transport, 4x4-styling cues, a raised ride height and no real off-road ability to speak of. Back in 1997, it was a cool alternative to the usual family hatchback, something that spoke of a rugged outdoorsiness. While the ubiquity of SUVs now means they're more associated with the school run than clambering an Alp, the CR-V has seen the market swing towards it and away from models with low-range gearboxes, knobbly tyres and body control more associated with a bulk freight carrier in a Biscay gale. The second generation model of 2002 barely deviated from this formula and neither did the third generation car of 2006. That model was a bit odd-looking, especially at the rear end, so sharpening the styling, building in added practicality and improving the perceived quality of the interior were all priorities for the fourth generation model which was announced in 2012 and which started arriving in UK dealers at the start of 2013. Where the original had six or seven rivals to counter, this latest car has thirty so it's inevitable that its market share has been diluted. Honda added the Black Edition and its sister vehicle the White Edition in February 2014.

What You Get

Honda has really concentrated on improving the utility of the fourth generation CR-V. Even in the four-wheel drive models, the floor is completely flat. Headroom in the back has also been improved, with the rear passenger's hip point being lowered by 38mm. Big windows make the rear feel airy and access is excellent. In fact, the length and height of the car have been reduced by 5mm and 30mm respectively compared with the previous model, without reducing the interior space at all. So it's even bigger inside, yet is easier to park. It also has one of the cleverest seat folding mechanisms around. Not only do the seats fold flat, but in order to do that, you just pull a little fabric handle, the seat base tumbles forward, the seat back dips down and the rear headrest tuck in snugly. Even with the rear seats in place, there's a cavernous 589-litres of space, so there really is room for five and their luggage in the CR-V. Drop these rear seats and within seconds you have 1,146-litres at your disposal. The load length has been increased by 140mm to 1570mm, while the height of the load lip has been reduced by 25mm to make it easier to load heavy or awkward items. The boot of the CR-V can now accommodate two mountain bikes or four sets of golf clubs.So what do you get if you just want a basic S specification model? Quite a bit actually, although even at this end of the range, it needs to impress in order not to be mauled by its increasingly impressive Korean rivals. There's 17-inch alloy wheels, dual zone climate control, cruise control, height and lumbar adjustable driver's seat, an auxiliary and USB connection for the stereo, a multi-function steering wheel, that brilliant One-Motion rear seat folding mechanism and heated door mirrors. As you ascend the range you'll find gear such as a power tailgate, HDD satellite navigation, leather seats and a panoramic glass roof. Safety is very well taken care of with even the entry-level cars getting a whole host of kit including vehicle stability assist, trailer stability assist, hill start assist, hill descent control and the usual roster of airbag and clever braking technology. It's only the top two trims in the range that offer the option of a camera and radar system that brings into play adaptive cruise control, collision mitigation braking and lane keeping assist.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

Honda's CR-V has racked up an impressive reliability record. Very few of these vehicles will have been driven off-road but there may be a few rogue examples out there. To be sure, check the underside of the car for knocks and scrapes. Make sure there's life in the clutch and that the tyres are in good condition and check for tired front dampers on diesels. The interiors look to have proven tough thus far. Honda's reliability record looks set to carry on being a target that many other car manufacturers benchmark.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a 2014 CR-V 2.0 SE) A headlamp unit for your CR-V will cost you around £275. A radiator retails for £180, whilst an alternator is £300 and a replacement starter motor will cost £240. Front brake pads are £60 a pair whilst an exhaust system costs £470. A replacement catalyst is £450.

On the Road

You get a choice of either petrol or diesel power. The usual rules apply that if you're a higher mileage driver, the diesels work out more cost effectively, but there's something to be said for all powerplants as an owner proposition. The petrol engine is a 155PS i-VTEC unit and like the majority of Honda petrol engines, it responds best if you put a few revs on the board. Okay, a lot of revs on the board. It's certainly willing and quite good fun to zing up and down the very good six-speed manual box although we have to wonder if it would be quite so appealing when the car's fully loaded and you're attempting to nurse it up a snowy incline. If you do go for this petrol engine, you then have another decision to make. It's whether to go for a front-wheel drive budget model or the four-wheel drive variant. In normal driving, you probably won't notice any difference. The four-wheel drive CR-V sends all of its power to the front wheels when you're driving on road and there's no need to mess about with extra gear levers or buttons. It does all the thinking for you, diverting drive to the rear wheels only when it feels that the fonts might have a little too much to do. Honda believes that the majority of CR-Vs sold will continue to be all-wheel drive models and with a run of bad winters behind us, it's easy to see why. The hydraulically activated "dual-pump" system of the third generation CR-V has here been replaced by an electronically activated system that provides a faster response when a loss of traction is detected. It also reduces weight by 17 per cent and minimizes internal friction by 59 per cent. The front-wheel drive model is 60kg lighter which helps it just pip the all-wheel drive petrol model to 62mph, registering 10 seconds flat as opposed to 10.2 seconds while both cars will run out of puff at a respectable 118mph. You can only buy the front-wheel drive model in conjunction with the six-speed manual 'box, but to be honest, the five-speed auto is a bit of a weak link so that's no great hardship. Most will probably opt for the improved torque and economy of diesel power and here you get a choice between a front-wheel drive 120PS 1.6 i-DTEC diesel or the punchier 2.2-litre i-DTEC diesel engine. The bigger unit is paired with an all-wheel drive chassis, which might be just as well given that this engine generates a hefty 350Nm of torque compared to the petrol powerplant's 192Nm. It gets to 62mph in a respectable 9.7 seconds. Peak power is rated at 150PS, which is far from class-leading. Yes, this engine has been tweaked to improve its emissions but this 2.2-litre powerplant has been around a good while. By comparison, something like a 2.0-litre diesel BMW X3 is good for 185PS and betters this Honda unit in virtually every regard. But that's the essential nature of the Honda's compromise. You can take virtually any aspect of its make-up and find a competitor that does better. But when you look at its performance as a whole, it's still a vehicle that will generate big sales. Honda's development team undertook a test programme on European roads to improve the CR-V's ride quality without compromising its car-like handling or high-speed stability. We'd have to say that the ride is firmer than we expected, despite a claimed 10 per cent increase in the damper rates all round. It's not crashy but it lets you know what the road surface is doing all the time. The flipside of this is that body control is very good for a relatively tall vehicle. If you've got kids who are often made a bit queasy by the low frequency pitch and roll of most SUVs, the slightly busier ride quality but flatter comportment of this CR-V might be a solution. Care has also been taken to achieve a significant reduction in the engine and road noise entering the cabin. Sound insulation material has been applied to the floorpan below the passenger compartment, while sound absorption material has been fitted to the rear door, rear wheel arches, door frames, front bulkhead and bonnet. The doors also feature a double seal. The net result is a 3dB reduction in cabin noise compared to the previous model but you'll still notice a bit of tyre noise, especially on concrete motorway sections.

Overall

The Honda CR-V is a car that speaks for itself. If you've decided you want an SUV, there isn't another vehicle in its class that makes ownership less stressful. You like an easy life? Here's your wheels. No, it's not the last word in style, but then target market buyers for this CR-V are comfortable with that. Were we shopping for a CR-V, we'd probably do without all-wheel drive and save money on a front-wheel drive car, with a little budget set aside for winter tyres. A 1.6-litre diesel is probably the prime pick, but it's hard to go wrong with any model in the range. Recommended.

CROSS REFERENCE (used) 28/08/2012

By Andy Enright

Introduction

In the real world, the way people use their compact SUVs is resolutely road-based. Most such motorists would probably think 'green laning' was keeping at an economical 65mph on the slow lane of a motorway. Honda, more than any other car maker, is a company that lives in the real world, designing its products to suit. Cars like this one, the improved third generation CR-V, continue a design approach based on bettering rivals where it counts. An easy way to irritate Honda's PR machine has always been to call this car a '4x4', even though all three of its generations, the 1997 MK1, the 2002 MK2 and this 2006 MK3, have all been all-wheel driven. The brand doesn't even like the term 'SUV', though it can hardly avoid that when listing this car's direct rivals as Land Rover's Freelander and Toyota's RAV4. Both were substantially improved following the original introduction of the third generation version of this Honda, so by 2010, this CR-V had to up its game too with a mild facelift and a fresh diesel engine that could be ordered with the auto gearbox that so many buyers wanted. Here's how to track down a decent used example.

Models

5dr compact 4x4 (2.2 diesel [Juro])

History

The Honda CR-V has established a profitable position for itself in the compact SUV / Crossover marketplace ever since the first generation car arrived in 1997. If anything, this Japanese maker's offering was ahead of its time in that it made little pretence of being any good in the rough stuff. Instead, it concentrated on providing customers with a high level of ride and handling on the road, plus a family-friendly interior design. The second generation model of 2002 barely deviated from this formula and neither did this Mk3 design. It was just that by the time the third generation version was launched in 2006, the public were far better catered for with regard to small road-biased 4x4s. So the CR-V had a fight on its hands. The MK3 model arrived in December 2006 with a pair of engines, one petrol and one diesel, and a trio of trim levels. Its key rivals were the Nissan X-Trail and Toyota RAV-4, two models that had been major players in the compact 4x4 market for a long time. Before too long, however, CR-V customers also had the likes of Citroen's C-Crosser, Peugeot's 4007, Mitsubishi's Outlander, Vauxhall's Antara, Chevrolet's Captiva, Renault Koleos, Volkswagen's Tiguan and the Ford Kuga to consider. Choice for the compact 4x4 customer had reached a zenith. Honda responded with a 2010 refresh which featured a cleaner, more powerful 2.2-litre diesel engine, an automatic gearbox option for diesel models as well as revised exterior styling. This model sold well right through to the car's replacement, which was unveiled in the Autumn of 2012.

What You Get

Visually, there aren't too many differences with this revised third generation model. The changes amount to a fresh front bumper and grille, a revised rear bumper, smarter alloy wheels and colour coded bumpers on plusher versions. But then, not too many changes were needed. This MK3 design was, after all, quite a step forward from its predecessor, with a lighter, wider but slightly shorter bodyshell claimed to be 85% stiffer. It was sleeker too, without traditionally clumsy SUV styling cues such as a side-opening tailgate with a great big spare wheel stuck on the back. Who needs that? This revised shape also managed to be more spacious inside, though unlike some rivals, it couldn't accommodate a third row of seats. Still, the rear seats you do get are set high to offer occupants a good view. There's plenty of legroom too, which you can extend by sliding them back and forth to maximise either passenger or luggage space. The backrest even reclines to really let rear passengers flake out on longer trips. When not required, said seats (which split 60:40 at the base and 40:20:40 at the back) can be tumbled forwards and stowed upright to create a space big enough for a pair of mountain bikes. You won't even need to remove their front wheels. Extra versatility is served up with a neat 'Double Deck' luggage storage system created by a shelf that can take weights of up to 10kg and sits just over a foot off the load floor. This hinged slab allows luggage below to remain easily accessible but out of view. At the wheel where everything falls easily to hand, there are an assortment of cubbyholes and segments for cabin storage. Honda hopes you'll notice the upgraded fabrics and plastics of this improved model, giving the CR-V interior a more premium finish. A slicker audio console design features too, though there are still a lot of fiddly buttons to familiarise yourself with on the multi-function steering wheel. Still, the improved sound deadening around the engine and cabin is welcome and, along with nice touches like the front seat armrests, makes this car an even quieter and more relaxing car to drive.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

Honda's CR-V has racked up an impressive reliability record. Very few of these vehicles will have been driven off-road but there may be a few rogue examples out there. To be sure, check the underside of the car for knocks and scrapes. Make sure there's life in the clutch and that the tyres are in good condition and check for tired front dampers on diesels.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a 2011 CR-V 2.0 SE) A headlamp unit for your CR-V will set you back around £200. A radiator retails for £150, whilst an alternator is £300 and a replacement starter motor will cost £240. Front brake pads are £50 for a pair, whilst an exhaust system costs £400. A replacement catalyst is £450.

On the Road

The CR-V can handle gentle off-road tracks thanks to its four-wheel drive system but as ever, you should think of this as an all-wheel drive-equipped car rather than a 'proper' SUV. Like most such systems, it functions in front wheel drive unless a pair of pumps decide that there's a speed differential between axles, prompting drive to the rear wheels to kick in. It's not as fancy as the viscous couplings or electro-hydraulic clutches that other makers use, but it does the job, giving you 4WD traction when you want it and 2WD efficiency when you don't. Under the bonnet, the 148bhp 2.0-litre VTEC petrol option continues to be ignored by most CR-V customers in favour of diesel power, in this case an improved 148bhp 2.2-litre i-DTEC unit borrowed from the Accord. It's pokier than its i-CTDi predecessor, with 10bhp more and a more muscular peak torque figure of 350Nm that aids towing, reduces the need for constant gearchanging and enables you to pull from low revs with less turbo lag, handy for example, when you need to zip out onto a busy roundabout. You don't really feel the benefit of all this so much if you opt for the 5-speed automatic model, a fact evidenced by the way it saps two seconds from the 6-speed manual's 10.2s 0-60mph time, a rapid figure comparable to that achieved by the petrol version. This in fact is more important than you might think on a car of this kind. Honda does, after all, claim the CR-V to be a 'drivers car' and reckons to have benchmarked it against the best family hatchbacks (rather than other 4x4s) when it comes to handling. There's the kind of independent suspension set-up you'd be more likely to see on a mildly sporty car, plus this third generation model saw its centre of gravity dropped by fully 35mm. As a result, you can forget the cumbersome roly-poly road manners and ponderous ride quality still common to some SUVs in this class.

Overall

If you're in the market for a used compact 4x4 that won't throw up any headaches, which is simple to operate, yet is packed with features, this improved third generation Honda CR-V is as good a bet as we can think of. Any downsides? Not everyone gets on with the styling and there are softer riding rivals. That's about it. The revised diesel with the automatic box is the car to go for, especially so if you can track down a reasonably priced example. Don't be afraid of big mileages. The diesel CR-V can easily shrug these off.

PERFECT PARTNER (family) 03/08/2018

Honda's fifth generation CR-V is the answer to the school run, June Neary decides this week.

Will It Suit Me?

It doesn't really matter what CR-V stands for. 'Compact Recreational Vehicle' will probably mean as much to you as it did to me. The fact is, Honda's CR-V is the kind of SUV that women like me tend to like very much. The fifth generation CR-V I'm looking at here is in many ways, a roomy hatchback on big wheels. It doesn't look as if it yearns to be plugging up a muddy hillside in first gear. It's happy around town and its neat dimensions mean that it's as manageable as the average family car.

Practicalities

To some extent, it's what the CR-V doesn't have which makes it such a practical option for family driving. It shuns a heavy military-type 4x4 system that's thirsty on fuel like some of the opposition. Instead, there's an electronically activated set-up that provides a fast response when a loss of traction is detected. Or you can just stick with a front-driven variant if you want. If you go with AWD in your CR-V, you'll get a package that's designed more for grass and gravel rather than mud and snow. There's no second gearstick or differential lock to worry about. You just get in and drive. Although it can despatch the speed bumps near school with ease, it gives a smooth, comfortable ride. Inside, the car will seat five in absolute comfort, plus with this MK5 model, there's a 7-seater option on the conventional petrol model, should you want three seating rows. The driving position is crisp and businesslike, the controls clear and logical. I appreciated the high-tech touches in the interior too, notably the seven-inch touchscreen displaying the easy-to-use 'Honda Connect' infotainment system. The cabin seems a lot classier than the last CR-V model I tried, featuring higher quality materials on key surfaces. I also liked this Honda's one-action fold down rear seat system, with the rear seats featuring a 60/40 split function. With the seats in place, you get an excellent 561-litres of luggage space in the conventional 1.5 VTEC variant I tried, which transforms to 1,756-litres with the seats folded. You get a totally level loading floor too and there's 1,830mm of loading length (up 250mm on the previous model) - enough to accommodate a 19.5-inch-frame mountain bike.

Behind the Wheel

If you want a family car with out and out performance, then the CR-V is not the obvious choice. That said, this Honda is by no means sluggish. Even the least powerful 173PS 1.5 VTEC version is nippy around town, while on the open road it offers as much verve as a warmish shopping hatch (62mph is 11.2s away) - and you won't wince when you pay for your fuel thanks to 44.8mpg combined cycle economy, allied with a 143g/km CO2 return. There's also a pokier 193PS version of this petrol model that gets 4WD and CVT auto transmission. And a 184PS 2.0-litre petrol Hybrid version for planet-saving folk - or those who might be disappointed that diesel power's no longer offered. With a low centre of gravity, Honda claims to have benchmarked the best family saloons in its class (rather than other SUVs) when it comes to handling. Forget the cumbersome roly-poly road manners and ponderous ride quality still common to some cars in this class. The CR-V has been engineered to be pin sharp straight out of the box, using a suspension system that's had more resource poured into it than many of the semi-agricultural setups you'll find on rival offerings.

Value For Money

As a second car for the family, even the cheapest CR-V would be a pricey option, at around £26,000 for the entry-level petrol version. This fifth generation CR-V has been positioned firmly at the upper end of the volume part of the mid-sized SUV 'C' segment, so don't expect the kind of £20,000-up pricing that characterises the most affordable 'Qashqai-class' models in this sector. Honda's asking prices start at around £26,000, but most likely buyers will probably be looking at a derivative priced in the £29,000 to £34,000 bracket - and it's possible to pay well over £37,000 for one, which really is getting into premium territory. There are three engines - a couple of conventional 1.5-litre VTEC Turbo petrol units developing either 173 or 193PS, plus a 2.0-litre non-Plug-in petrol/electric Hybrid with a combined output of 184PS and a starting price of around £29,000. There are no diesels this time round. The base 173PS 1.5-litre VTEC petrol models only come with manual transmission; the 193PS petrol variants and the Hybrids only come with a CVT automatic. Across the line-up, there are four trim levels - 'S', 'SE', 'SR' and, as in the case of the car I tried, 'EX'.

Could I Live With One?

The short answer is yes, please. For day-to-day needs, the CR-V is a joy to drive. It has all the advantages of a family car, but it's a lot more fun. If your weekend pursuits include muddy walks with the dog, picnics with the children or a good, long hike with your partner when you can get away from it all, the CR-V will come into its 'recreational' own.

Honda CR-V average rating: 4.5/5 (7 reviews)

- 06/04/2019, owner of a Honda CR-V 1.5 VTEC Turbo SR 5dr CVT

User rating: 4/5

User comment:
Very pleased overall, the auto gearbox is superb and driving is a pleasure, ride, noise and handling are all excellent. Downside is poor fuel economy, as usual nothing like that claimed by the manufacturer. General driving, I can't achieve 30mpg, but most of my driving involves down to the river bridges west of Maidstone and back up the other side. On motorways I might get 35mpg, and I don't drive fast or madly. Most online reviews I have seen say the audio and map screens are slow to respond and awkward to use, but I have not found this to be the case, they are very adequate. The features and controls generally are easy to use and understand if you check out the extensive manual. In conclusion, as I have said, I am very pleased with the car and would recommend to anyone.

- 07/02/2018, owner of a Honda CR-V 2.0 i-VTEC SE Plus 5dr 2WD

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
We all love our new CRV, the only thing that is disappointing is the petrol mpg - we are shocked at how little it does. Apart from this the car is lovely, it handles brilliantly and would recommend this to anyone.

- 05/09/2017, owner of a Honda CR-V 2.0 i-VTEC SR 5dr Sat Nav

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
So far our Honda CRV is living up to Honda's claim, of a comfortable, reliable, vehicle, with the Honda Dealership's great service to match. Recommend Honda to everyone.

Read all Honda CR-V Reviews

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