Mercedes-Benz C-Class C220 CDI BlueEFFICIENCY AMG Sport 5dr 2.1 Diesel Automatic Estate (2014 ) available from Volvo Horsham

This vehicle is currently in stock at Volvo Preston and can be purchased from Volvo Horsham.

01403 593 090

£10,000

WAS £10,500, SAVE £500

Finished in Obsidian Black Metallic paint and comes fitted with 5.8 inch multi-function display screen, Audio system with CD player that reads MP3 CDs, Automatic air conditioning with two climate control zones, Bluetooth includes phone connection and music streaming, Connections for USB, Front and rear radar-type parking distance sensors, Service interval indicator, Space saver alloy spare wheel, Speed limiter, Sports suspension, Stability control system, Steering wheel mounted remote audio controls and much more.

14/02/2014

64785

Automatic

Diesel

BLACK



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Emissions and Fuel

CO2:
136 g/km

MPG:
54.3

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* Price does not include road fund license

V5 Document

V5 Document

MOT Certificate

MOT Certificate

Manuals

Manuals

Body Glass

Electric windows one touch open/close, Green tinted glass, Rain sensor windscreen wipers, Rear wiper

Brakes

ABS + BAS, Adaptive brake system, ESP with ASR, Hill start assist

Carpets/Rugs

AMG floormats

Chassis/Suspension

Agility control sports suspension with selective damping system

Driver Aids

Attention assist, Cruise control, Parktronic - front/rear, Speed sensitive steering

Driver Convenience

Easy-pack tailgate - Powered opening/closing automatically

Driver Information

Colour information display, Service indicator (ASSYST PLUS)

Driving Mirrors

Electric folding door mirrors + auto dimming rear view + drivers exterior door mirror, Electrically adjustable and heated door mirrors

Engine

Diesel particulate filter

Entertainment

Audio 20 radio/CD with 5.8" screen and Bluetooth connection, USB/aux input socket

Exterior Body Features

Aerial in rear window, AMG body styling, Body colour bumpers, Body colour door handles, Chrome roof rails, Chrome trim on rub strip and waistline trim, Radiator grille with integral star

Exterior Lights

Automatic headlights, LED daytime running lights

Interior Features

3 spoke AMG steering wheel in Nappa leather, Bag hook in luggage compartment, Black roof lining, Door sill panels with stainless steel inlays, Front and rear door pockets, Front centre armrest with storage compartment, Height/reach adjustable steering column, Load compartment cover, Multi function steering wheel, Rear centre armrest with cupholders, Sports pedals with stainless steel surfaces and rubber studs, Steering wheel gearshift paddles

Safety

Drivers knee airbag, Dual stage Driver/Passenger Airbags, Front and rear window airbags, Front side airbags, Pre-Safe anticipatory safety system, Three 3 point rear seatbelts, Tyre pressure warning, Warning triangle and first aid kit

Seats

1/3 to 2/3 split folding rear seats, Child seat recognition sensor, Isofix rear child seat fastenings, Neck-pro front headrests, Partial electric front seats/backrest/height adjust, Rear head restraints, Sports seats

Security

Alarm system/interior protection/immobiliser, Remote central locking

Vanity Mirrors

Sunvisors with illuminated vanity mirrors

Wheels - Spare

Space saver spare wheel

General

Badge Engine CC: 2.1
Badge Power: 170
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: CDI BlueEFFICIENCY
Coin Series: AMG Sport
Generation Mark: 3
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 32E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 30
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: N
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: N
NCAP Safety Assist %: N
Service Interval Mileage: 15600
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 999999
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO: 0.054
CO2 (g/km): 136
HC: N
HC+NOx: 0.156
Noise Level dB(A): 70
NOx: 0.146
Particles: 0.0002
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 5

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 2143
Compression Ratio: 16.2:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 83
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 99
Engine Layout: NORTH SOUTH
Fuel Delivery: COMMON RAIL
Gears: 7 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: SEMI-AUTO

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 54.3
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 62.8
EC Urban (mpg): 44.1

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 8.3
Engine Power - BHP: 170
Engine Power - KW: 125
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 3000
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 295
Engine Torque - MKG: 40.8
Engine Torque - NM: 400
Engine Torque - RPM: 1400
Top Speed: 136

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Space Saver?: True
Tyre Size Front: 225/45 R17
Tyre Size Rear: 245/40 R17
Tyre Size Spare: SPACE SAVER
Wheel Style: AMG 5 TWIN SPOKE
Wheel Type: 17" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: N
Height (including roof rails): 1459
Length: 4606
Wheelbase: 2760
Width: 1770
Width (including mirrors): 2008

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 59
Gross Vehicle Weight: 2205
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1500
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 485
Max. Loading Weight: 540
Max. Roof Load: 100
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 1800
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 750
Minimum Kerbweight: 1665
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 10.84

CLASS OF THE FIELD? (new2) 23/03/2018

This improved Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe is better placed than ever before to put one over on its domestic rivals. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Review

The smallest coupe that Mercedes-Benz makes could also arguably be said to be the best, at least from the point of view of an enthusiastic driver. This improved second generation C-Class Coupe targets two-door versions of BMW's 4 Series and Audi's A5 more effectively than the Three-Pointed Star has ever managed to do before.

Background

For some time, BMW and Audi had the mid-sized executive coupe sector to themselves; BMW with the 3 Series Coupe model that became the 4 Series Coupe: Audi with its A5. Mercedes introduced a C-Class Coupe model in 2011 to try and face up to these competitors, but it didn't make much headway. Only with the introduction of the second generation C-Class Coupe in 2015 was the Three-Pointed Star finally able to take on its Teutonic rivals at their own game. Here was a car that handled considerably more sharply than its four-door C-Class showroom stablemate. In fact, it was a good match against an equivalent 4 Series or A5 Coupe model. The only fly in the ointment were the carry-over base petrol and diesel engines that most customers had to be content with. If Mercedes could produce something better in this area, you felt, then it really would have a very complete contender on its hands. Well, with this revised second generation C-Class Coupe design, that's just what the Stuttgart brand has brought us.

Driving Experience

When we first tested the original version of this second generation C-Class coupe, we were particularly impressed by its surprisingly sharp handling dynamics. This attribute continues with the revised range but here, perhaps the most important news is the introduction of fresh mainstream petrol and diesel engines beneath the bonnet. The range kicks off with the new 1.5-litre petrol unit fitted to the base C200, a model available either rear-driven or with 4MATIC AWD. This powerplant puts out 184hp and a useful 280Nm of torque, plus it features clever 'EQ Boost' technology which uses a 48volt on-board network with a belt-driven starter/alternator. When accelerating, 'EQ Boost' system can assist the engine with an additional 14hp, bridging the brief moment until the turbocharger has built up its full charge pressure. Mercedes has also developed a 2.0-litre 254hp version of this petrol engine for the C300 variant. As mentioned, there's a new four cylinder diesel too, the previous 2.1-litre unit now replaced by a state-of-the-art 2.0-litre powerplant with 194hp. As before, across the range there's a standard 'DYNAMIC SELECT' driving modes system - and you can add to that with optional 'DYNAMIC BODY CONTROL' adaptive damping. At the top of the range lie the fearsome Mercedes-AMG models, offered with V6 or V8 power. The V6-engined C43 4MATIC now puts out 390hp, 23hp more than before. That's enough to take a C43 Coupe from rest to 62mh in just 4.7s. Beyond that lies only the V8 C63 AMG model, with a 4.0-litre V8 Biturbo engine offering either 476 or 510hp.

Design and Build

The styling of this revised second generation C-class Coupe isn't much different, a revised front bumper slotting under the smart diamond radiator grille which is flanked by standard-fit LED High Performance headlights. As before, a high beltline and frameless doors with free-standing exterior mirrors aim to underscore the sporty character. One particular highlight is the long drawn-out dropping line typical of a coupe. In contrast to the C-Class Saloon, the dropping line extends further past the rear wheel arch. To underscore the Coupe's sporty disposition, the suspension is 15 millimetres lower than that of the Saloon. Inside, the cabin gets the option of the fully-digital instrument display, a 12.3-inch TFT screen that replaces the conventional dials using technology borrowed from larger Mercedes models. You can customise the layout between three display styles - 'Classic', 'Sport' and 'Progressive'. As before, flowing forms characterise the centre console as well as the door and rear side panelling, which smoothly merge into one another to emphasise the coupe character. There are front sports seats specifically designed for this Coupe variant and featuring automatic belt feeders for added convenience. The choice of materials and the finish have a hand-crafted feel with high-class appeal and aim to deliver a fresh take on modern luxury.

Market and Model

Expect pricing to be much as before, which means that most models will be sold in the £38,000 to £40,000 bracket. There's just one trim level - 'AMG Line' - before you get to the top Mercedes-AMG variants. Intelligent 'MULTIBEAM LED' headlights that adjust to road conditions are now optional. As with all modern Mercedes vehicles, buyers will be attracted by solid build quality and a certain familiarity with the look and feel of the cabin. This coupe sees many of the features that previously only appeared on £50k+ models filtering down to more affordable versions. One example of this is the air conditioning system that uses satellite navigation to detect tunnels. Having identified one, it closes the air recirculation flap automatically when you enter the tunnel to prevent bad smells from filtering into the cabin, then opens it again when you exit. This revised model features the option of Mercedes' latest 'level 2' autonomous driving technology, with improved camera and radar systems that allow it to see up to 500m ahead. You'll need the optional 'Driving Assistance Package' for that, which features the brand's 'Active Distance Control DISTRONIC' active cruise control system which can draw on navigational data to predictively adjust your speed. Other new developments include intuitively understandable 'Active Lane Change Assist' and 'Active Emergency Stop Assist' as new functions of the existing 'Active Steering Assist' set-up. Plus the capability of the standard Active Brake Assist autonomous braking system has been extended to mitigate the consequences of rear-end collisions with slow-moving, stopping or stationary vehicles.

Cost of Ownership

The new 1.5-litre EQ Boost petrol engine fitted to the base C200 enables a useful improvement in efficiency to be possible, so don't automatically opt for a diesel this time round. It puts out 140g/km of CO2. This unit features a clever starter/alternator that during deceleration recuperates kinetic energy and charges the battery. For auto models, there's also a gliding mode that operates at cruising speeds, switching the engine off, before seamlessly re-starting it when you brush your foot against the throttle. And a 'recuperative brake with intelligent engine stop' function which also works when the vehicle is coasting. Mercedes says that internal friction is much reduced with this new four cylinder unit. As for the new 2.0-litre diesel engine fitted to the C220d, well it performs to the latest super-stringent Euro 6d-TEMP standard and uses a particularly efficient 'step recess' combustion process - named after the shape of the combustion case in the piston. Internal friction is also reduced here - by around 25% - and the engine's more compact, leading to significant efficiency benefits. It puts out 121g/km of CO2. What else? Well maintenance costs will be kept down thanks to an ASSYST Plus service indicator on the dash that'll calculates precisely when a dealer visit might be needed. And residual values will be as high if not higher than anything else in the class.

Summary

The only area where this second generation C-Class Coupe really needed improvement was when it came to the most affordable petrol and diesel engines. Now that these have been brought up to date, this car looks a very complete package indeed. No luxury brand - come to think of it, no other brand of any kind - offers a wider choice when it comes to coupe motoring than Mercedes-Benz. This C-Class Coupe may be the marque's most affordable offering when it comes to this kind of car, but it still feels of very high quality indeed. But that you would expect. What might be more of a surprise is just how satisfying a driver's machine this model can be, especially in its more powerful forms thanks to clever suspension and a hi-tech range of engines. The top C 63 AMG variant is a potential BMW M4-beater and even more affordable versions - the volume diesel derivatives for example - can be remarkably rewarding on the right road, even if the sporty AMG add-ons do slightly affect running costs. You could argue that many potential Mercedes buyers won't especially value this car's surprisingly dynamic repertoire - and you might be right. Important though, we think, for the Stuttgart brand to show that it was capable of providing it. If that was the intention, then the job's been done well.

C SHARP (new2) 09/03/2018

The Mercedes C-Class has sharpened up its act and in doing so has become a force to be reckoned with. Jonathan Crouch reports.

Ten Second Review

This much improved version of the fourth generation Mercedes C-Class features a package of significant enhancements. The exterior revisions are subtle but inside there are important changes, including the option of a fully-digital instrument cluster. As previously, the core range is built around saloon and estate models and there are fresh entry-level petrol and diesel engine options. Plus the driving experience has been enhanced with the optional application of Mercedes' latest autonomous driving technology.

Background

This fourth generation '205' model series C-Class has delivered a stronger proposition with a greater focus than was the case with its predecessors. That's been necessary for two reasons. First, stronger competition in the mid-sized premium badged executive saloon and estate segment, not only from the usual suspects, BMW's 3 Series and Audi's A4, but also from cars like the Jaguar XE and the Lexus IS. Secondly, there's been the fact that Mercedes buyers have had an alternative to this car in the shape of the brand's similarly priced and comparably sized CLA four-door coupe. Since this MK4 model's original launch at the end of 2013, Mercedes has gradually broadened out the range, first with fire-breathing Mercedes-AMG performance derivatives, then with sleek Coupe and Cabriolet body styles. By early 2018 though, it was clear that a little more remedial work would be needed to keep this car competitive with the best of the opposition, hence the introduction of the heavily revised version we're going to look at here.

Driving Experience

The C-Class has for some time been, and will continue to be, a car with a clear focus on comfort and refinement - at least in its mainstream guises anyway. It was the first model in this class to offer the option of air suspension, though most buyers stick with the standard steel springs. As before, across the range there's a standard 'DYNAMIC SELECT' driving modes system - and you can add to that with optional 'DYNAMIC BODY CONTROL' adaptive damping. All models come as standard with 9G-Tronic automatic transmssion, which now features nine speeds and buyers certainly aren't short of engine options, with most still likely to want a diesel. There's a base 160hp 1.5-litre unit in the C200d. But most buyers opt for the 2.0-litre 194hp unit on offer in the C220d variant, which offers the option of 4MATIC 4WD. The entry-level petrol unit in the base C180 is a 1.6-litre 156hp powerplant, but ideally you'd stretch to the more modern, much perkier 184hp 1.5-litre engine installed in the C200 which features the brand's latest 'EQ Boost' technology using a 48volt on-board network with a belt-driven starter/alternator. When accelerating, 'EQ Boost' system can assist the engine with an additional 14hp, bridging the brief moment until the turbocharger has built up its full charge pressure. 4MATIC 4WD is optional. Mercedes has also developed a 2.0-litre 258hp version of this petrol engine for the C300 derivative. Beyond that lie only the Mercedes-AMG high performance derivatives. The first of these, the 3.0-litre V6 C43 4MATIC, now puts out 390hp, 23hp more than before. Beyond that lies only the V8 C63 AMG model, with a 4.0-litre V8 Biturbo engine offering either 476 or 510hp.

Design and Build

You'd have to know the C-Class quite well - or be a Mercedes sales person - to immediately notice the exterior aesthetic changes made to this revised model. The design of the front and rear lights is defined by clear-lined contours. On both the saloon and the estate, the bumpers have been re-styled both front and rear and the sportier 'AMG Line'-trimmed models get a sleeker front apron and rear diffuser. Large wheels emphasise the rear and communicate a stylishly sporty character, while 'intelligent' Multi-Beam LED headlamps that adapt to toad conditions are now optional. Inside, the alterations are more obvious, with the introduction - as an option - of the fully digital instrument display already familiar from the brand's E-Class and S-Class models, complete with touch-sensitive steering wheel buttons. This is complemented by now-larger centre console screens that can be either 7-inches or 10.25-inches in size, the latter format used for the top 'COMMAND' multi-media set-up that many customers will want. Otherwise, it's much as before, with a broad centre console swooping between the front occupants. In the back, rear seats space isn't especially generous but there's a very class-competitive 480-litres of boot space too. With the estate, the figure's 490-litres.

Market and Model

Prices haven't changed too much, as before sitting mainly in the £30,000 to £50,000 bracket. There are two main body styles, saloon and estate - plus coupe and cabriolet derivatives too. And for the four door and the station wagon, three trim levels, 'SE', 'Sport' and 'AMG Line' before you then get into the super-serious Mercedes-AMG C43 4MATIC and C63 high performance models. As for equipment, well that's more generous than it used to be. Media connectivity will be important to likely customers, so every C-Class comes as standard with an 'Audio 20' multimedia system featuring two USB ports, an SD card reader, Bluetooth connection and media interface. Many though will want to upgrade to the 10.25-inch 'COMAND Online' centre-dash screen that boasts fast 3D hard-disc navigation and access to a Concierge service that'll connect you through to help with every aspect of your journey. This can connect into a 12.3-inch digital cockpit display. There's now an optional wireless charger and an 'Energizing' comfort control system that links various interior functions to create a series of relaxing themes. Plus there are now two optional audio upgrade choices - a 9-speaker 225-watt set-up and the top Burmester surround sound system. Safety-wise, 'Active Brake Assist' autonomous braking is standard. And there's an optional 'Driving Assistance' package that delivers the 'Active Distance Assist DISTRONIC' system enabling 'level 2' autonomous driving capability.

Cost of Ownership

The new 1.5-litre EQ Boost petrol engine fitted to the base C200 enables a useful improvement in efficiency to be possible, so don't automatically opt for a diesel this time round. It features a clever starter/alternator that during deceleration recuperates kinetic energy and charges the battery. For auto models, there's also a gliding mode that operates at cruising speeds, switching the engine off, before seamlessly re-starting it when you brush your foot against the throttle. And a 'recuperative brake with intelligent engine stop' function which also works when the vehicle is coasting. Mercedes says that internal friction is much reduced with this new four cylinder unit. It manages 53.3mpg on the combined cycle in a 2WD saloon model on standard wheels, while emitting 123g/km of CO2. As for the new 2.0-litre diesel engine fitted to the C220d, well it performs to the latest super-stringent Euro 6d-TEMP standard and uses a particularly efficient 'step recess' combustion process - named after the shape of the combustion case in the piston. Internal friction is also reduced here - by around 25% - and the engine's more compact, leading to significant efficiency benefits. A C220d saloon 2WD model on standard wheels manages up to 61.4mpg on the combined cycle and CO2 emissions of 117g/km. What else might potential C-Class buyers need to know? Well maintenance costs will be kept down thanks to an ASSYST Plus service indicator on the dash that'll calculates precisely when a dealer visit might be needed. And residual values will be as high if not higher than anything else in the class.

Summary

Is this improved Mercedes C-Class good enough to score conquest sales from its key competitors? Only a positive answer will do for Mercedes. Potential Audi customers will like the high technology - the intelligent headlamps, the autonomous driving kit and so on. Wavering BMW buyers may be tempted by the sophisticated petrol engine technology. And both groups will appreciate the class-leadingly luxurious cabin and the impressively high likely residual values. Don't get me wrong - Mercedes still has work to do with this car, primarily in terms of weight-saving in comparison to rivals. But on the evidence of this model, the signs are that its rivals are going to have to up their game.

STAY CLASSY (used) 28/02/2014

By Andy Enright

Introduction

It's difficult to consider the Mercedes-Benz C-Class in isolation. This is a car that's inextricably linked to two other vehicles, the BMW 3 Series and the Audi A4. Whenever one of these models steals a march on the other pair, there's a furious scuffle to reclaim lost ground. Unfortunately for Mercedes, it has found itself in the position of playing catch up too often, and the C-Class sits on the third step of this particular podium, in UK sales at least. On the Continent, it's a different story and the Mercedes puts a sound leathering on the A4 and even outsells the 3 Series in some markets. The third generation C-Class has always been a popular pick with used buyers. Here's how the late facelifted versions of this car stack up.

Models

4dr saloon, 5 dr estate (2.1, 3.0 diesel, 1.6, 1.8, 6.2 petrol [Executive SE, AMG Sport, AMG Sport Plus, AMG])

History

The year 2007 was pivotal for Mercedes. This was the time that, after fourteen years in the shadow of the BMW 3 Series, the C-Class finally stepped out and asserted itself. For so long, too many aspects of the C-Class had been a copy of BMW's strategy, yet it felt like a car without a great deal of personality that was leaning on rather than enhancing that three-pointed star. In March of 2007, we got the W204 version, the third generation C-Class, and it delivered a return to reassuring quality and driver appeal. Stuttgart was back in the game. Fast forward to July 2012 and Mercedes had enjoyed over five years of solid service from the C-Class. It decided to offer it a light refresh for the last couple of years of its life. In came a more efficient 1.6-litre turbocharged petrol engine at the base of the range, while the mighty 6.2-litre C63 AMG remained unaffected by the 2012 model changes. This most modest of facelifts lasted the C-Class through to its 2014 replacement with an all-new car.

What You Get

The 2012 refresh wasn't the most extensive piece of remedial design, but then it didn't need to be. The C-Class's lines had aged well and the technology had been incrementally improved throughout the car's life. There were new interior and exterior features, including revised colour options, repositioned cruise control and indicator stalks and easier-to-read silver graphics for the telematics screen. The telematics system in conjunction with Mercedes-Benz COMAND now included eCall to report the car's position to a call centre via GPS in the event of an emergency. The revised trim structure started with Executive SE and then ascended to AMG Sport and AMG Sport Plus, with the C63 AMG saloon and estate sitting somewhat conspicuously at the top of a petrol engine range that went 1.6-litre, 1.8 litre, 6.2-litre. 'Executive SE' variants offered a sports grille, new 16-inch alloy wheels, Artico upholstery and LED daytime running lights at a price increase of only £35 over the previous SE grade. A Luxury Package was offered for Executive SE models to replace the former Elegance trim option. This carried a £2,000 premium and included the three louvre grille with bonnet-mounted star, 17" alloy wheels with a seven twin-spoke design, automatically dimming rear view mirror and folding exterior door mirrors, chrome trim on the side, rear and shoulder line, a storage package and brown Ash wood trim with a matt finish. The previous Sport trim was ditched for two new variants; AMG Sport and AMG Sport Plus. The AMG Sport Saloon and Estate cost £960 less than the previous Sport models, and featured 17-inch AMG wheels and halogen headlights. For another grand you got AMG Sport Plus, which featured 18-inch bi-colour AMG alloys, bi-Xenon front lights with Intelligent Light System and Adaptive High Beam Assist, AMG sports seats, Black Artico/Dinamica upholstery with contrast red stitching, red seat belts, AMG floor mats with red edging and silver gearshift paddles on the automatic models. Otherwise things were much as before. The W204 third generation C-Class is a bigger car than the model it superseded, 45mm longer in the wheelbase and 42mm wider overall. Legroom is generous in the back but passengers over six feet tall may have an issue with the amount of headroom available. The boot capacity is a sizeable 475 litres and the lid opens nice and wide to enable larger items to be lowered inside. With the estate body style, as tends to be the case in this sector, the actual load volume with the seats in place is only marginally superior to that of the saloon (485-litres instead of 475) but the shape and adaptability of the space, not to mention the improved access, bring definite advantages. With both sections of the rear bench folded down, there's a maximum of 1,500-litres to be exploited, along with a maximum load length of 2.82m, 17cm more than in the previous generation C-Class Estate.

What You Pay

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What to Look For

Insist on a full Mercedes dealer service history, especially for the most recent models whose lengthy warranty - effectively for the life of the car - is dependent on proper servicing by an authorised agent. Check that all the accessories work and watch out for cosmetic damage which can be expensive to correct. These are popular family cars, so check for wear and tear in the rear. Also look for the usual signs of wheel kerbing and poorly repaired accident damage. Mercedes experienced problems with the piezo electric injectors on the C250 CDI and replacing them within factory tolerances seems to be a problem for many dealerships, resulting in sub-par economy.

Replacement Parts

(approx. based on C250 model) Allow around £90 for a set of front brake pads and £75 for the rear and about £375 (excluding catalyst) for a factory exhaust system. A full clutch replacement would cost around £295, a radiator is about £245 whilst a starter motor can be up to £250. A new alternator would be in the region of £500.

On the Road

For C-Class customers, the mainstream engine choice comprises four cylinder petrol and diesel units. There are two direct injection petrol powerplants comprising a 154PS 1.6-litre BlueEFFICIENCY unit (in the C180), plus a 204PS 1.8-litre (badged C250). Then there are the 2.1-litre diesel powerplants. Choose from either 136PS (C200 CDI), 170PS (C220 CDI) or 204PS (C250 CDI), depending on your performance requirements. At the top of the range is the 457PS C63. The C-Class has never enjoyed a reputation as a top-drawer drive, thanks largely to unimpressive steering and some coarse engines, and although only the C63 offers a truly effortless feel, the rest of the engines are in this facelifted third generation model a good deal more refined and the steering and suspension packages are much improved. The steering is accurate without offering heaps of feedback, but its taciturn nature calms the experience at the wheel over the sort of poor surfaces and unruly cambers that affect the typical British B-road. Particular attention was paid in these facelifted versions to further finessing the automatic gearbox and all automatic variants get the 7G-TRONIC PLUS seven-speed box which was tuned to improve fuel efficiency across the range. Despite being a good deal more economical than before, performance is quite energetic and even the base diesel C200 CDI feels agreeably spry, sprinting from rest to 60mph in a mere 8.9 seconds.

Overall

In third generation guise, the Mercedes-Benz C-Class matured from an also-ran to a class act. Most importantly for used buyers, the horrible build quality of the previous MK2 model was firmly consigned to the past when this one arrived in 2007, Mercedes realising that such cost-cutting was sending buyers elsewhere. The facelifted post-2010 versions we've been looking at here are well worth seeking out if your budget will stretch, thanks to their more efficient engines and extra equipment. As for which variant you should choose, well a CDI diesel may be the obvious way to go but don't overlook the C180 BlueEFFICIENCY petrol-engined variant if your mileages are a bit more modest. Recommended.

FAIRER C (used) 25/11/2013

BY STEVE WALKER

Introduction

When Mercedes has got the better of its rivals down the years, it's usually done so by sticking to what it does best. That means producing cars that are instilled with quality, reliability and a certain class. The problem the brand faced with the C-Class it launched in 2007 was that the compact executive car market appeared to be residing in a place that wasn't exactly in tune with traditional Mercedes values. BMW and Audi were succeeding with dynamic, sporty conveyances for the young executive and next to them, mainstream versions the C-Class felt rather reserved. To claw back lost ground, this C-Class needed a paradigm shift.

Models

Models Covered: 4dr saloon and 5dr estate [C180K, C200K, C230, C280, C350, C63, C220 CDi, C220 CDi, C320 CDi. (SE, Elegance, Sport,)]

History

Mercedes needed ordinary versions of its C-Class to look and feel as vibrant and exciting as their BMW 3 Series and Audi A4 equivalents. There was no problem at the top of the range where the fearsomely powerful AMG models had never been in machismo deficit. The concern was that in pursuing younger clientele with the more affordable models, the established Mercedes-Benz customer base would be alienated. As a solution to this, the 2007 C-Class was given a split personality. Elegance and SE models would retain the comfort and traditional feel Merc fans tend to appreciate while the Sport trim level would play competitors at their own game. As a result of the conviction within Mercedes-Benz to directly confront rivals without deserting its core market, the C-Class was launched with the usual diverse range of engines and an unusually diverse range of front grilles. In a unique move, the manufacturer chose to give the Elegance and SE models the traditional Merc grille with three-pointed star bonnet ornament while the Sport got a far racier tri-blade item featuring a huge three-pointed star emblem at its centre. Along with the lowered sports suspension and body-styling accessories, this was supposed to give the Sport a fighting chance of usurping the A4 S-Line and 3 Series M-Sport models in the affections of thrusting compact executive car buyers. The range was fleshed out further following the initial launch by the arrival of the Estate model to supplement the saloon in late 2008 while BlueEFFICIENCY fuel-saving technology was added to the range at around the same time in the shape of a revised version of the C180K model.

What You Get

The C-Class design may not be particularly challenging but it is classically good-looking, the elegance you usually associate with larger Mercs very much in evidence. The car's front wheels are edged right up into its corners, with the wheelarches nudging neatly against the line of the headlamps and a bumper assembly that's drawn out into a subtle chin spoiler at its base. In profile, there's a stubby, flat-fronted look to the nose with the much longer rear overhang topped by the gentle curve of the sculpted bootlid. A swage line that gradually deepens as it runs rearward draws the eye back, creating the impression of forward motion. The car's stance is pugnacious and aggressive, far more so than in pervious C-Class models, and this sporty flavour can be emphasised further by buyers who seek out the Sport models. The C-Class is a bigger car than the model it superseded, 45mm longer in the wheelbase and 42mm wider overall. Legroom is generous in the back but passengers over six feet tall may have an issue with the amount of headroom available. The boot capacity is a sizable 475 litres and the lid opens nice and wide to enable larger items to be lowered inside. With the estate bodystyle, as tends to be the case in this sector, the actual load volume with the seats in place is only marginally superior to that of the saloon (485-litres instead of 475) but the shape and adaptability of the space, not to mention the improved access, bring definite advantages. With both sections of the rear bench folded down, there's a maximum of 1,500 litres to be exploited along with a maximum load length of 2.82m, 17cm more than in the previous generation C-Class Estate. Everything inside the C-Class feels sturdily built but some of the trim finishes on lower-spec models leave something to be desired. The swathes of dark plastic make the cabin less visually attractive than an equivalent A4 but there's ample space for four occupants and equipment levels are far more generous than previous Mercedes-Benz efforts might lead you to expect. Safety kit is also present in abundance.

What You Pay

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What to Look For

The Mercedes reputation for peerless reliability took some knocks in the 1990s but the manufacturer got itself back on track in some style. Notable issues have yet to come to light and the C-Class has preformed well in customer satisfaction surveys. Lots of these cars will see service on company fleets and should be well maintained. Don't let high mileages put you off unduly but insist on a full service history.

Replacement Parts

(approx. Based on C220 CDi model) Allow around £50 for front brake pads and £30 for the rear, plus about £400 for a full Mercedes exhaust system. A full clutch system would cost around £250, a radiator is about £150 whilst a starter motor can be up to £500.

On the Road

The split in the C-Class range isn't confined to the grille. While all the models feature an adaptive suspension system that tailors its settings according to the driving conditions, the Sport models have a lower and stiffer set-up designed to enhance the handling and dynamic response for the car. This set-up might be on the firm side for some tastes but there's no doubt that the C-Class drives with impressive agility. Comfort levels are higher on the models without sports suspension and even here, the driving experience is far from flabby. On the diesel front, the line-up kicks off with the C200 CDI packing 136bhp. The C220 CDI offers 170bhp and buyers wanting the ultimate C-Class oil-burner can step up to the 224bhp 320 CDI. These engines are advanced common-rail turbo diesels and, with torque outputs of 270Nm, 400Nm and 510Nm respectively, they pack a hefty punch in the mid range. Petrol-wise, it's the supercharged C180 Kompressor getting things under way with 156bhp. The C200 Kompressor gets 184bhp while six-cylinder buyers can choose the C230 with 204bhp, the 231bhp C280 or the range-topping C350 with its 272bhp output. The C63 AMG has a crushing 450bhp at its disposal courtesy of a 6.3-litre V8. Fuel economy is an area where models like the C220 CDI excel and a combined figure of 46.3mpg coupled with a generously proportioned 73 litre fuel tank gives a lengthy 744 mile range. Carbon dioxide emissions are also very low, the 160g/km figure being quite some achievement for a car with the level of performance.

Overall

A pre-owned Mercedes C-Class remains the safe bet it always has been but the third generation car has more strings to its bow. With a range set-up to provide sportiness as well as comfort and quality, Mercedes succeeded here in broadening the appeal of its compact executive stalwart. This C-Class remains very much a Mercedes-Benz for those that want one but the sharper looks and chassis mean that this car is also worthy of consideration by buyers who might not have seen themselves as Mercedes drivers in the past.

HEY GOOD LOOKING (family) 23/03/2018

The C-Class Coupe serves up a low key but high concept slice of modern Mercedes design. June Neary tries it.

Will It Suit Me?

I was always a secret admirer of the old Mercedes CLK coupe and I say secret because, while I always recognised the car was never quite as good as a BMW 3 Series coupe of the same period, I preferred the Mercedes' styling and didn't want to be labelled superficial. I always longed for a sleek two-door Mercedes that was not only achingly pretty but also able to mix it with BMW's best in every other area. Now I know that coupes are usually one class of car that get an exemption from most of the normal rules based on the way they look, and it has to be said that this latest C-Class Coupe does look extremely good, but as soon as it arrived, I began searching for the catch. The good news? So far, I don't seem to have discovered any notable caveats.

Practicalities

The C-Class Coupe doesn't cost an awful lot less than Mercedes' E-Class Coupe and you have to wonder whether there's really space for both models in the market. Mercedes reason that older buyers will prefer the E, while the young - and the young at heart - will prefer the C-Class. They're both handsome pieces of styling, but I'd go for the C-Class every time. Unless you can stretch to the fire-breathing C63 AMG models, the styling of the C-Class is rather low key, with the modern Mercedes family face grafted onto a sleek and, yes, mature profile. The rearmost side window shape looks suspiciously like a BMW which in itself is no bad thing, and the only design detail that you'd need to be careful of are the wheels. The 18-inch alloy wheels can look a little lost with those big slab flanks, so much as I enjoy a smooth-riding car, I think I might be tempted to go for a 19-inch wheel to give the car the right amount of visual balance. As with all coupe models in this class, there's not a great deal of room in the back, but that's hardly big news. The boot is a decent size and the rear seats fold down if you need to carry long items.

Behind the Wheel

Jump inside and you'll find the C-Class Coupe has been treated to the same high quality fittings that Mercedes has bestowed upon the latest C-Class saloon and estate. The materials quality is far higher than C-Class models of the past and there's plenty of space for front seat occupants although the rears remain best left for small kids or handbags. This C-class also gets the option of the fully-digital instrument display, a 12.3-inch TFT screen that replaces the conventional dials using technology borrowed from larger Mercedes models. You can customise the layout between three display styles - 'Classic', 'Sport' and 'Progressive'. As before, flowing forms characterise the centre console as well as the door and rear side panelling, which smoothly merge into one another to emphasise the coupe character. There are front sports seats specifically designed for this Coupe variant and featuring automatic belt feeders for added convenience. Engines? The range kicks off with the new 1.5-litre petrol unit fitted to the base C200, a model available either rear-driven or with 4MATIC AWD. This powerplant puts out 184hp and a useful 280Nm of torque, plus it features clever 'EQ Boost' technology which uses a 48volt on-board network with a belt-driven starter/alternator. When accelerating, 'EQ Boost' system can assist the engine with an additional 14hp, bridging the brief moment until the turbocharger has built up its full charge pressure. Mercedes has also developed a 2.0-litre 254hp version of this petrol engine for the C300 variant. There's a new four cylinder diesel too, the previous 2.1-litre unit now replaced by a state-of-the-art 2.0-litre powerplant with 194hp. Across the range there's a standard 'DYNAMIC SELECT' driving modes system - and you can add to that with optional 'DYNAMIC BODY CONTROL' adaptive damping. At the top of the range lie the fearsome Mercedes-AMG models, offered with V6 or V8 power. The V6-engined C43 4MATIC now puts out 390hp. At the top of the range is the C63 AMG which is most certainly not for the faint hearted. Developing a frankly overstuffed 476 or 510hp (depending on the variant chosen), this is a vehicle that will delight the skilled driver and terrify the timid in equal measures, as indeed a proper AMG product should.

Value For Money

Mercedes has priced the C-Class Coupe extremely carefully, taking into account the positioning of its E-Class two door as well as the BMW 4 Series Coupe and the Audi A5. Most models will be sold in the £38,000 to £40,000 bracket. Ongoing running costs are very competitive. The new 1.5-litre EQ Boost petrol engine fitted to the base C200 enables a useful improvement in efficiency to be possible, so don't automatically opt for a diesel this time round. It puts out 140g/km of CO2. This unit features a clever starter/alternator that during deceleration recuperates kinetic energy and charges the battery. For auto models, there's also a gliding mode that operates at cruising speeds, switching the engine off, before seamlessly re-starting it when you brush your foot against the throttle. And a 'recuperative brake with intelligent engine stop' function which also works when the vehicle is coasting. Mercedes says that internal friction is much reduced with this new four cylinder unit.

Could I Live With One?

As long as you don't need to regularly transport adults (or adult-sized kids) in the back, then it's hard to see how anybody couldn't make space for a Mercedes C-Class Coupe in their lives, funds permitting of course. Unfortunately, funds aren't permitting right now, so as much as I would love a new C220d, it's back to the classifieds for me. I'm belatedly coming out of the closet and declaring my affection for that old CLK.