Peugeot 208 1.2 PureTech 110 GT Line 5 door Hatchback (15MY) at Warrington Motors Fiat, Peugeot and Vauxhall

01925 934 123

Call now for sale price

New/Unregistered

0

Manual

Petrol 65.7 combined MPG

Nera black

Library images for illustration only.



This vehicle may not be available from this dealership immediately please contact us to arrange a viewing.

We pride ourselves in only providing cars of the highest of standards - all vehicles are taken through a pre-delivery inspection and are fully HPI checked for your peace of mind. We price our vehicles for sale on the basis of age, condition and mileage. The vehicles for sale may have previously been used for business or hire purposes and so may have had multiple users. Where we hold documents relating to vehicle history, these are available for inspection on request and we are happy to address any specific queries before you view or make an offer to purchase any vehicle.


Customer Views 0

You chose Warrington Motors Fiat, Peugeot and Vauxhall.

Get Directions

You can buy this car from the following dealers:


This vehicle may not be available from this dealership immediately please contact us to arrange a viewing.

Please quote reference W038572.

All vehicles can be purchased from your local Motorparks dealer regardless of their physical stock location.

Best part-ex price paid
Ready to test drive
Finance Available

Email Me Details Email Similar
Can I Get Credit?

CO2: 99 g/km

MPG: 65.7

  • Black pack - 208
  • Metallic - Nera black
  • Model Year:1(2015)

General

Badge Engine CC: 1.2
Badge Power: 110
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: PureTech 110
Coin Series: GT Line
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 18E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: N
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: N
NCAP Safety Assist %: N
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 16000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 60000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO2 (g/km): 106
HC+NOx: N
Particles: N
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 6

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1199
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: TURBO DIRECT INJECTION
Gears: 5 SPEED
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 61.4
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 72.4
EC Urban (mpg): 48.7

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 9.6
Engine Power - BHP: 110
Engine Power - KW: 81
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 5500
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 151
Engine Torque - MKG: 20.9
Engine Torque - NM: 205
Engine Torque - RPM: 1500
Top Speed: 117

Test Cycles

Emissions Test Cycle: NEDC Correlated

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 205/45 R17
Tyre Size Rear: 205/45 R17
Tyre Size Spare: FULL SIZE
Wheel Style: Caesium
Wheel Type: 17" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1460
Height (including roof rails): N
Length: 3973
Wheelbase: 2538
Width: 1739
Width (including mirrors): 2004

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 50
Gross Vehicle Weight: 1600
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 743
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 285
Max. Loading Weight: 525
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 1150
Minimum Kerbweight: 1075
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 10.4

LOVE AND EIGHT (new2) 09/08/2019

Peugeot's 208 supermini has been rejuvenated in second generation form. Jonathan Crouch takes a look.

Ten Second Review

Peugeot says that with this second generation 208, it wanted to create 'the sexiest small hatch in the purest way'. Certainly, no effort's been spared here: there's a new platform, a fresh look and a completely redesigned interior, all of it targeting what the brand hopes will be a younger buyer. There's an all-electric version too.

Background

What exactly should a supermini be? Affordable? Economical? Practical? All these things are important of course, but if you're a car maker and that's all you create to sell in this segment, then you'd better be prepared to sell it very cheaply. Even in this humble category you see, buyers are now expecting more in terms of style, innovation and technology. In fact, they're expecting something more like this, Peugeot's MK2 model 208. This, the latest in Peugeot's long running line of 'two zero' cars could hardly be more important for the French brand. It switches the company's supermini on to a properly modern chassis, the CMP platform for B and C segment cars that's shared with the DS 3 Crossback and the new Vauxhall Corsa. Crucially, this can support both fossil-fuelled engines and all-electric powertrains - and does in this case. As a result, Peugeot reckons it has an answer in this car no matter what the target customer is looking for. Perhaps.

Driving Experience

Engine-wise, there are three petrol units and a single diesel to choose from. If you know the Peugeot brand, you might not be too surprised to hear that the available petrol units are all 1.2-litre three cylinder PureTech powerplants, in this case developing either 75, 100 or 130hp. The 100hp unit is optionally available with an 8-speed EAT8 auto gearbox. The 130hp engine gets the auto 'box included. We've not previously seen an automatic with 8-speeds in the supermini sector. The diesel is the company's usual 1.5-litre BlueHDi engine with 100hp. As for the all-electric e-208 version, well just one variant of that will be available featuring a 50kWh battery mated to a 100kW electric motor, this confection developing a healthy 134hp. Of course, as you'd expect in a modern supermini, you can get all the usual driver assistance features. things like lane keep assist to stop you from drifting out of your lane, with subtle steering intervention to ease you back to where you ought to be. And an autonomous parking system which is capable of automatically controlling acceleration, braking and steering when entering or leaving a parking space. there's also a traffic sign recognition system that can work with the integrated speed limiter and make sure that you never exceed the stated limit of the road you're on.

Design and Build

The second generation 208 is larger, lower and wider than its predecessor and borrows inspiration for its silhouette from the brand's old 205 supermini of the Nineties. The base of the windscreen has been pushed back and there's more of a shoulder line to the bodywork below the window line. At the front, there's a large, intricately detailed grille with triple white LED headlights and some eye-catching LED daytime running light 'fangs'. At the back, the lines are more curvaceous and defined than with the previous model, the rear screen is more angled and there's a glassy black centre section housing triple red LED lights on each side. Inside, this 208 gains Peugeot's 'i-Cockpit' design philosophy in its latest form. There's a classy 3D driver display and a central TFT infotainment screen available in 5-inch, 7-inch or 10-inch sizes, depending on spec. A really nice cabin detail is the fold-down flap under the 'piano key'-style keys that decorate the centre console, concealing an area which can house your smartphone in several different ways while it charges - either inductively or via two charging points. And the area has an angled lip so that you can view your 'phone's screen while it's charging. At the back of this 208, you'll find decent passenger space for a car of this size. And Peugeot's keen to point out that the e-208 all-electric version has the same amount of rear seat legroom and boot space as the fossil fuelled derivatives.

Market and Model

Prices start from just over £16,000 and run up to around £23,500 for the conventionally-engined models. Buyers choose from base trim, then 'Active', 'Allure', 'GT Line' and 'GT' specifications. The full-electric e208 is offered in all but base trim, at prices starting from around £25,000 (following subtraction of the £3,500 government Plug-in car Grant). With the e-208, access to charging points via the PSA Group's 'Free2Move' service is included. As you'd expect, a wide range of driver assistance and safety technologies are available this time round. Go for the auto gearbox (or an e-208 model) and the adaptive cruise control system you can have has the ability to make the car automatically stop and go in heavy traffic. You can have this system with a manual gearbox too, where it operates down to 18mph. Lane departure warning, auto parking and blind spot monitoring systems are available too. Go for a variant with the largest 10-inch centre dash infotainment display and you'll get built-in navigation, plus 'Apple CarPlay'/'Android Auto' smartphone-mirroring.

Cost of Ownership

Expect the 1.2-litre PureTech petrol variants that most will buy to be very acceptably clean and frugal. With the 100hp manual model, you can expect to manage up to 53.0mpg on the WLTP combined cycle and return an NEDC-rated CO2 reading of up to 96g/km, which is pretty good going for a car in this segment. The 1.5-litre BlueHDi diesel version of course does much better. Up to 71.4mpg on the combined cycle is theoretically possible, along with up to 84g/km of NEDC-rated CO2. But of course if you're really interested in ecological efficiency, there'll be just one variant of this car that'll interest you, the all-electric e-208. For this derivative, Peugeot claims a WLTP-rated driving range between charges of 211 miles. And fast charging at the rate of 100kW is available via a CCS socket hidden behind the fuel cap, with an 0-80% charge achievable in around 30 minutes. If you install a wallbox at home, you can recharge the battery from empty in around five hours if you have an 11kW electricity supply - or in around eight hours with a 7.4kW supply. Bear in mind that the e-208 is around 350kgs heavier than the ordinary version.

Summary

So the 208 has evolved - but not beyond recognition. In improving it, Peugeot has certainly tried to cover all the bases, while being very conscious that trying to please too many people too much of the time is a sure-fire recipe for failure - or at the very least, a distinctly compromised and forgettable end-result. 'It's OK to have 20% of people not liking this car', the company's MD used to say, 'as long as the other 80% love it'. This time round, we reckon his brand doesn't have too much to worry about. There may be a few supermini buyers who don't like the cabin layout, want something better suited to cornering on its door handles or who might prefer the value proposition of a budget brand - but I'm guessing they'll be in the minority. Most will recognise that in this 208, Peugeot has perfected for us the supermini it was always capable of. A smart small car choice - in more ways than one.

THE LION ROARS BACK (used) 02/04/2015

By Andy Enright

Introduction

If pushed to name the most significant car launch of this decade, some might point to the Tesla Model S for its incredible electric technology, or maybe the Toyota GT86 for redefining our relationship with rear-wheel drive sports cars. The car we'd choose though, would be the Peugeot 208. It's a supermini that actually does very little that's new or groundbreaking, but it's significant for a hugely uplifting reason if you're a car enthusiast. It was the car that put Peugeot right back in the game as a top-drawer manufacturer of fun, classy hatches. The brand's Eighties 205 supermini was a champ but its successor, the 206, was a dud that sold in huge numbers. That was actually about the worst publicity Peugeot could have given itself, broadcasting its ineptitude to a great deal of customers. The subsequent 207 was a trier, but was never quite there. With the 208, though, it was a different story. Fun, well-built, sharply-styled and full of interesting features, it was a winner from the word go. If only Peugeot could get all those people whose faith in the marque was shaken by their 206 experiences back in the fold, the 208 could be a fixture at the top of the sales charts. Here's what to look for when buying used.

Models

3/5dr supermini (1.0, 1.2, 1.6 petrol, 1.4, 1.6, 2.0 diesel [Access, Access Plus, Active, Style, Allure, XY, GTI, GTI Prestige, GTI Limited Edition, GTI 30th Anniversary, Roland Garros, Intuitive, Feline])

History

Things started well for the Peugeot 208 from the outset in 2012. The design got its Euro NCAP five-star crash test result in the bag in the April of that year, then was first displayed to the crowds at the Goodwood Festival of Tweed a few months later in June. Then it scooped Auto Express' gong for 'Best Supermini' before real life buyers ever got to try one. By September, Peugeot was announcing a 208 GTi hot hatch version and an 'XY' luxury derivative. At the end of 2012, Peugeot realised that the 208 had generated the strongest order-take for a launch of any vehicle in the company's history and had contributed to a 5.6 per cent growth in year on year sales. The good times were coming back for the French brand. Old habits die hard though and they were unable to resist the old short term sales boost strategy of launching special editions. We got the first of these at the start of 2013, the 'Intuitive' version. May 2014 saw the launch of another special edition, the 'Style' and another followed in June, this time based on the GTi and christened the 'GTi 30th Anniversary'. In February 2015, a revised Peugeot 208 was announced for the Geneva Show, with revised styling and more personalisation options.

What You Get

The 208 represented a new design direction for Peugeot in this class. Many of the styling cues are directly attributable to the SR1 show car which debuted at the 2010 Geneva Show and while the basic silhouette could be accused of being a little more generic than its predecessors, the detailing is crisp, the surfacing neat and the overall shape is extremely cohesive. The GTi version looks great, with a hat tip to the legendary 205 GTi in the form of a metallic insert on the C-pillar. The cabin is a big step ahead too and there's some novel thinking afoot. Rather than expecting drivers to peer through the steering wheel at the gauges in the usual way, Peugeot instead made the wheel smaller and lower so that drivers would be able to look over it for an unobstructed view of the main instrument binnacle. Higher quality finishes and a very neat infotainment system feature on all but base-trimmed models, while both three and five-door variants offer plenty of occupant space by segment standards. Not only do rear seat occupants get 5cm more knee room than they would have done in the 207 model this car replaced but they get that in a model 7cm shorter and 1cm lower than that predecessor. That increased passenger space doesn't come at the expense of luggage capacity either, with the 208 offering 1.5 cubic litres more than the 207 when it came to bootspace.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

The 208 has enjoyed a far better reliability record than its problematic predecessor, but there are a couple of things you should check over when looking at the cars. The first is a fully stamped up service record. Next, examine for flaking of paint on the bumpers and check that the air conditioning works and that the pixels on the centre display are all good. Also check for rear bumper scrapes. Finally check that the Bluetooth pairs reliably with your phone handset.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a 2012 208 1.2) Parts prices are affordable. In terms of consumable items, an air filter is around £15, with an oil filter retailing at approximately £20. Spark plugs are £10 each with a timing belt weighing in at the £60 mark.

On the Road

The best thing about the 207 was its engine technology and the 208 carried on where the 207 left off with probably the most impressive range of efficient engines in the whole supermini class. Encouragingly, Peugeot made a solid commitment to making the 208 a more fun car to drive than its immediate predecessor. Rather than start with a toe in the water, Peugeot launched a full product offensive, with three diesel engines and five petrol powerplants. More good news came through an intensive programme of weight saving. Peugeot pared around 110kg off the weight of equivalent 207 models, which is a huge advantage in a car so compact. As well as improving economy and emissions, cutting weight improves acceleration, braking and agility - all traditional Peugeot supermini attributes. The entry level model tips the scales at 975kg, which isn't a great deal more than a Lotus Exige. That's impressive. Of course, from the launch of this car, enthusiasts wanted to know what the 208 GTi hot hatch variant would be like. Well, it was great. Pop the bonnet and you'll find a 1.6-litre THP 200bhp petrol engine coupled to a manual gearbox with six close-ratio gears. With its maximum torque of 275Nm and its peak power of 200bhp, the 208 GTi polishes off the sprint to 62mph in 6.8 seconds. Stiffer springs were fitted and the ride height dropped by 8mm but Peugeot hatches have always ridden well and this 208 was no exception. There's no limited slip differential fitted so if you really work the front tyres hard out of a bend, you'll see precious motive power disappearing in tyre smoke from the inside front corner before the ESP stability control system decides enough is quite enough. Traction is otherwise more than adequate and the 208 GTi has that pleasant ability of flowing down a road quickly and without undue drama but can still play the hooligan if you choose to rough-house it along. It's an impressive showing.

Overall

Genuine petrolheads will know the contribution Peugeot has made to automotive history, so for many of us, the late Nineties and Noughties were a painful time, as this once-brilliant company foisted cars like the 206, the 307 and the flabby 607 on us. Cars that neither rode nor handled well just didn't seem as if they should carry a lion on their badges and it took a long time for Peugeot to come good. The 208 and the subsequent 308 showed the French company was back in the groove. As a used buy, a 208 stands up extremely well. Reliability has been better than many had hoped for, residual values have stood up fairly well as a result and the GTI is just a little belter. No, it's not quite as pin-sharp as a hot Clio on a race track, but we think that makes it a better road car on typical British roads. You could say that of the standard version too. It smacks of Gallic greatness.

Peugeot 208 average rating: 4.5/5 (2 reviews)

- 14/08/2019, owner of a Peugeot 208 Allure

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
I previously owned a 208 and wanted to go back to one. It is a delight to drive.

- 16/08/2018, owner of a Peugeot 208 Active

User rating: 4.5/5

User comment:
I am having a nice time with my car many thanks to David at Ford Thanet.

Can I Get Credit?

Search Used Cars, Car Dealerships and New Cars by: Region | County | Town