Ford Grand C-MAX 2.0 TDCi Titanium 5dr Powershift Diesel Automatic Estate (2012) available from Preston Motor Park Fiat and Volvo

This vehicle is currently in stock at Ford Croydon and can be purchased from Preston Motor Park Fiat and Volvo.

01772 950 707

£7,200

WAS £9,000, SAVE £1,800

Ford Grand C-Max, 7 Seater, Automatic Transmission, Fitted with dual zone climate control, bluetooth, electric windows front and rear, powerfold wing mirrors, cruise control, Ask about our GardX Vehicle Protection System, this car also qualifies for our AA backed Warranty for Life Package.

31/07/2012

34223

Automatic

Diesel

RED



We pride ourselves in only providing cars of the highest of standards - all vehicles are taken through a pre-delivery inspection and are fully HPI checked for your peace of mind. We price our vehicles for sale on the basis of age, condition and mileage. The vehicles for sale may have previously been used for business or hire purposes and so may have had multiple users. Where we hold documents relating to vehicle history, these are available for inspection on request and we are happy to address any specific queries before you view or make an offer to purchase any vehicle.


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V5 Document

V5 Document

MOT Certificate

MOT Certificate

Keys

Keys

Manuals

Manuals

Service Log Book

Service Log Book

Body Glass

'Global' closing of front/rear windows, Automatic rain sensing wipers, Electric front windows, Electric rear windows, Intermittent rear wash/wipe, Quickclear heated windscreen

Brakes

ABS + traction control, Electronic brake force distribution, Emergency brake assist, ESP, Hill start assist

Carpets/Rugs

Premium floor mats

Communication

Ford SYNC Bluetooth connection with voice control and USB port

Driver Aids

Cruise control + speed limiter, PAS

Driver Convenience

Easy fuel capless refuelling system

Driver Information

Trip computer

Driving Mirrors

Auto dimming rear view mirror, Body colour door mirrors with integral indicators, Electric folding door mirrors, Electric heated door mirrors

Engine

Diesel particulate filter

Entertainment

Remote audio controls on steering wheel

Exterior Body Features

Body colour bumpers with black rubbing strip, Body colour door handles, Chrome finish on upper door line, Dual sliding rear doors

Exterior Lights

Automatic headlights, Front fog lamps

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Dual zone electronic climate control

Interior Features

12V accessory sockets - front and rear, 4 spoke leather steering wheel, Aluminium scuff plates, Auxiliary power socket, Centre armrest with storage box, Child observation mirror, Cloth upholstery, Leather gearknob, Premium centre console, Rake/reach adjustable steering wheel, Satin chrome interior door handles, Tonneau cover

Interior Lights

Ambient interior lighting, Courtesy light in luggage compartment, Footwell illumination, Front/rear courtesy lights, Front/rear reading lights

Safety

3 point seatbelts, Driver and passenger airbags, Driver and passenger side airbags, Fasten seatbelt reminder, Front and rear curtain airbags, Height adjustable front seatbelts, Intelligent Protection System (IPS), Power child locks, Tyre pressure monitoring system

Seats

Driver/passenger lumbar adjustment, Driver/passenger manual seat height adjust, Fully adjustable front headrests, Isofix child seat attachment, Sports style front seats, Three height adjustable rear head restraints, Versatile split folding rear seat - 40/20/40

Security

Anti-theft immobiliser, Locking wheel nuts, Remote central double locking, Thatcham 1 volume sensing alarm

General

Badge Engine CC: 2.0
Badge Power: 140
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: TDCi
Coin Series: Titanium
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 20E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 12
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 1
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: 96
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: 81
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: 5
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: 50
NCAP Safety Assist %: 71
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 12500
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 60000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: 120
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: 125000
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO: 0.247
CO2 (g/km): 149
HC: N
HC+NOx: 0.168
Noise Level dB(A): 70
NOx: 0.145
Particles: 0.0004
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 5

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 1997
Compression Ratio: 16.0:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 85
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 88
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: COMMON RAIL
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: SEMI-AUTO

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 49.6
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 57.7
EC Urban (mpg): 39.8

Performance

0 to 62 mph (secs): 10.5
Engine Power - BHP: 140
Engine Power - KW: 103
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 3750
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 236
Engine Torque - MKG: 33
Engine Torque - NM: 320
Engine Torque - RPM: 1750
Top Speed: 123

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 215/50 R17
Tyre Size Rear: 215/50 R17
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: 15 SPOKE
Wheel Type: 17" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1684
Height (including roof rails): 1698
Length: 4520
Wheelbase: 2788
Width: 1828
Width (including mirrors): 2067

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 60
Gross Vehicle Weight: 2300
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1742
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 755
Max. Loading Weight: 666
Max. Roof Load: 75
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 1500
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 750
Minimum Kerbweight: 1634
No. of Seats: 7
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 11.4

MAX FACTOR (used) 31/10/2014

By Andy Enright

Introduction

The first generation version of Ford's five-seater C-MAX model was originally supposed to be offered with a seven-seat option but the Blue Oval brand got cold feet at the last minute and kept that car to just a couple of seating rows. It was a bad decision that cost the company plenty of sales in the compact MPV sector, so when the second generation C-MAX range arrived in 2010, it was inevitable that this oversight would be put right. So it proved, a 'Grand C-MAX' variant launched alongside the five-seat ordinary C-MAX variant. It's the Grand model we're going to check out here. Here's what to look out for.

Models

5dr MPV (1.0, 1.6 petrol, 1.6, 2.0 diesel [Zetec, Titanium, Titanium X])

History

Let's face it, Ford didn't exactly rush to get a seven-seat compact MPV into production. Vauxhall hit upon that winning formula with its seven-seat Zafira way back in 1999 and probably couldn't believe the fact that the Blue Oval let them have an unchallenged eleven year run at the European market for compact seven-seat MPVs. Still, all good things eventually come to an end and the Zafira was suddenly faced with quite the challenge when in 2010, Ford pulled the wraps off its Grand C-MAX. It certainly had the benefit of being able to observe where market trends were going and also how different rivals tackled the problem of packaging seven seats in a modest body length. The Grand C-MAX was spun off the second generation C-MAX platform, arriving in dealerships in October 2010. Buyers chose from either 105 or 125 PS versions of the 1.6i TI-VCT engine or a more powerful 150PS 1.6 Ecoboost petrol. Diesel customers were catered for with a 115PS 1.6-litre TDCi - or a 140PS 2.0-litre TDCi unit that came with the option of the excellent twin-clutch Powershift transmission. The range wasn't too difficult to get a handle on, with just Zetec and Titanium trims on offer, with plusher Titanium X spec subsequently being introduced. Customers were attracted to the upper-spec cars, with 65 per cent going for the Titanium trim and most attracted to the 1.6 TDCi 115PS powerplant. In October 2012, the 1.0-litre Ecoboost petrol engine was introduced to the Grand C-MAX range in 100 and 125PS guises. The range was facelifted in late 2014.

What You Get

It's a while since we've been surprised by the looks of a Ford product but the 'kinetic design' themes that have been rolled out across the model range are far from unattractive, so we'll forgive the lack of adventure on the part of Blue Oval designers. By the standards set by other compact MPVs, which aren't always the highest, the Grand C-MAX is a handsome devil. Avid Ford watchers will recognise the trapezoidal grille, the swept back headlights and the sharp line around the bonnet and the flanks. The Grand C-MAX is fully 4,520mm long with a wheelbase increased by 140mm compared to the standard car. It's also 40mm taller and these extended dimensions allow it to cram in that third row of seating. The roof line is flatter and the window pillars are thinner to enhance the view out of the Grand C-MAX but the other major difference is that, while the C-MAX has conventional rear doors, the Grand C-MAX employs sliding doors on its flanks. This creates wider apertures for improved access to the rear seats and eliminates the risk of children clouting adjacent cars when they clamber out in the car park. The design inside looks slick. In line with the other modern Fords, there's plenty of metallic detailing and the quality of fit and finish seems high. It's the seats that will provoke the most interest however, as the designers clearly did a lot of work on maximising versatility. In the Grand C-MAX, the sliding side doors mean it's possible to access the third row without sliding or tilting the outer seats in the second row. There's also a clever feature where the centre seat in the second row can collapse under the right hand seat, giving a six-seater layout with walk-through access to the rear. Standard equipment on all models includes alloy wheels, air conditioning, leather steering wheel, a Thatcham category one alarm, a DAB radio/CD system and Bluetooth with USB connectivity and voice control.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

All of the engines are tough units and the diesels are especially good, so no major mechanical issues there. The cabins are reasonably hardwearing too, but look for damage in the rear caused by tots. The Grand C-MAX tends not to be driven quite as hard as regular Focus models, but it's still worth keeping an eye out for mega-mileage company hacks that have been given a mileage haircut. Worn carpets, and scuffed trim are the usual clues. Check that all the electrical items work properly, ensure that the air conditioner delivers chilled air soon after the engine is started and remember that there's no excuse for missed servicing, so look for a detailed history.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a Grand C-MAX 1.6) As you might expect, parts are plentiful and relatively inexpensive. A clutch assembly will be around £115 and an alternator should be close to £165. Brake pads are around £35 a front set and a replacement headlamp is close to £140. A full exhaust is about £275 and a catalyst is about £285.

On the Road

There's nothing old fashioned about the Grand C-MAX engine range either, Ford having fitted a collection of leading edge powerplants littered with the kind of technology that the layman has no hope of understanding. There are 1.6-litre Ti-VCT petrol units with independent variable camshaft timing and 1.6-litre EcoBoost SCTi engines that also run on unleaded but also feature a low-inertia turbocharger. The diesels are 1.6 or 2.0-litre in capacity and share Ford's TDCi high pressure common-rail direct injection technology. The EcoBoost units are likely to be the choice of those who want some zip in their driving experience. There are 148bhp and 178bhp versions to consider, the latter producing its 240Nm maximum torque constantly between 1,600 and 4,500rpm. That spells good flexibility and there's even an overboost feature which increase torque to 270Nm for short periods of hard acceleration. The 1.0-litre engines sound great on paper but have frustrated owners by failing to get anywhere close to their published fuel economy figures. Regularly drive a fully-loaded C-MAX and you'll probably prefer the torque of the diesels. Many MPV buyers automatically home in on anything with a diesel engine and with good reason. When the running costs are totted up, oil-burning makes real sense in a family car, provided it's being done by the engine and not the wayward 10-year-old in the third row. The 1.6 TDCI comes in 94bhp and 113bhp forms, with the latter trumping the most powerful petrol engine with its torque output. The real big hitters are the 2.0-litre TDCi units in 138bhp and 161bhp states of tune with up to 340Nm of pulling power available.

Overall

The Ford Grand C-MAX might have taken a while to come to the party, but at least Ford took the time to get the product right. There's really not a bad car in the range and everything just works. Remember, Ford had sold the C-MAX for fully seven years when it launched the Grand, so it understood a thing or two about compact MPVs. Lengthening the wheelbase and adding another couple of chairs in the back was the easy bit. Tracking down good used examples of this original 2010 to 2014-era first generation model shouldn't be too tricky. There'll be quite a few cars that'll look a bit tired because family life has been hard on them, but by the same token, it's easy to avoid the neglected ones and the mega-mile company hacks. A well-looked after C-MAX diesel would be our recommendation and if you're in the market, why not look for a bargain 2.0-litre TDCI with the Powershift box? It's a class act.

MAX FACTOR (used) 17/10/2014

By Andy Enright

Introduction

Choosing an MPV is all too often a rather soul-destroying exercise. You look at carrying capacity, how the seats fold, how impervious to your kids' more destructive tendencies the interior is and become deeply acquainted with how easy it'll be to clean orange Dorito food-colouring from the upholstery. Ford realised that there needed to be more to it than that and its C-MAX has capitalised on this fact. Here's what to look for when choosing a used second generation model.

Models

5dr compact MPV (1.0, 1.6 petrol, 1.6, 2.0 diesel [Zetec, Titanium, Titanium X])

History

The market for MPV family cars is one that is not wholly impervious to fashion. First seven seats was a must-have, then five. Then the market diverged into a number of different classes, of which this Ford C-MAX sits about midway. Its predecessor stuck to its guns with five seats and the second generation model we look at here, built between 2010 and 2014, followed suit. Hedging its bets, however, Ford also released a long-wheelbase Grand C-MAX with seven seats. The upshot of this is that the five-seat C-MAX we examine here was freed up to be a little bit more dynamic. It certainly looked reasonably good, but other car makers discovered that these medium-sized MPVs don't need to look like mobile greenhouses. The first generation C-MAX first arrived way back in 2003 wearing the Focus C-MAX badge but this second gen car hit dealerships in October 2010. Buyers chose from either 105 or 125 PS versions of the 1.6i TI-VCT engine or a more powerful 150PS 1.6 Ecoboost petrol. Diesel customers were catered for with a 115PS 1.6-litre TDCi - or a 140PS 2.0-litre TDCi unit that came with the option of the excellent twin-clutch Powershift transmission. The range wasn't too difficult to get a handle on, with just Zetec and Titanium trims on offer, with Titanium X subsequently being introduced. Straight away the car was a big hit. In its first year on sale, the C-MAX doubled the sales of the final year of the previous generation car, forcing Ford to up production volumes at its Valencia plant. What's more, customers were attracted to the upper-spec cars, with 65 per cent going for the Titanium trim and most attracted to the 1.6 TDCi 115PS powerplant. In October 2012, the 1.0-litre Ecoboost petrol engine was introduced to the C-MAX range in 100 and 125PS guises.

What You Get

Although it looks quite diverting when specified with big alloys wheels and in bright metallics, the Ford C-MAX isn't the most adventurous piece of vehicle design. The overall silhouette is fairly amorphous but the detailing can be very deft. Look at the trapezoidal grille, the swept back headlights and the sharp line around the bonnet and the flanks. Even the roof of the five-seat car is a good deal more raked than the flat topped seven-seater and the exterior sliding door rails, so often an eyesore on MPVs, are neatly integrated. Ford seems to have blown much more of the budget inside the C-MAX. The dashboard is a riot of cowls, metallic and piano-black finishes and sweeping arcs. It draws its inspiration from the shape of the Fiesta's fascia but is a few degrees bolder and is all the better for it. Locating the minor controls can take a little getting used to but it's an impressive piece of design. There are some neat touches like the bullhorn shape that sweeps up from the lower instrument panel and the cowled dials that look as if they've come straight out of an Alfa Romeo show car. Brilliant. Build quality seems solid, with Ford using soft-touch materials on the upper instrument panel and extra care has been taken in sourcing durable seating fabrics that will cope with the worst your kids can dish out. The seating system is extremely slick and the three entirely separate rear seats can slide, fold or be removed completely, plus there's an optional Comfort feature in which the two outer seats can be slid further back and towards each other to give huge leg and shoulder room while the narrow centre seat is folded out of the way. You'll need to keep an eye on the outer seat backrests though. If the seat is reclined these can spring forward with quite a wallop when released. Standard equipment on all models includes alloy wheels, air conditioning, leather steering wheel, Thatcham category one alarm, DAB radio/CD and Bluetooth with USB connectivity and voice control.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

All of the engines are tough units and the diesels are especially good, so no major mechanical issues there. The cabins are reasonably hardwearing too, but look for damage in the rear caused by tots. The C-MAX tends not to be driven quite as hard as regular Focus models but it's still worth keeping an eye out for mega-mileage company hacks that have been given a mileage haircut. Worn carpets, and scuffed trim are the usual clues. Check that all the electrical items work properly, ensure that the air conditioner delivers chilled air soon after the engine is started and remember that there's no excuse for missed servicing so look for a detailed history.

Replacement Parts

(approx based on a Focus C-MAX 1.6) As you might expect, parts are plentiful and relatively inexpensive. A clutch assembly will be around £115 and an alternator should be close to £165. Brake pads are around £35 a front set and a replacement headlamp is close to £140. A full exhaust is about £275 and a catalyst is about £285.

On the Road

As with the massive majority of modern Fords, the driving experience puts the C-MAX at a distinct advantage. The thing is, you might not be expecting that advantage to be quite as obvious as it proves. There are certain cars that just feel right as soon as you move off in them and the C-MAX is one of them. The usual procedure for an MPV is to try to get comfortable behind a bus-sized steering wheel, and then fire up a diesel engine that sounds like it's escaped from an industrial tarmac grader. The steering will be vague, the cornering about as precise as a Michael Fish hurricane alert and acceleration and braking will be distinctly underwhelming. The C-MAX somewhat joyously scotches these stereotypes. The ride is incredibly supple. Turn into a corner and the Ford won't lurch onto its outside front wheel. The steering even transmits decent feedback through the wheel. Its power assistance is electric, which helps to save the energy lost through running a hydraulic pump all the time and, to be fair, most electrically assisted steering systems feel like something you'd plug into your XBOX. Yes, they're accurate but lacking in involvement, an accusation you'd never level at this Ford. More good news comes in the form of the 1.6-litre Ecoboost petrol engine fitted to the C-MAX. Unlike many turbocharged engines, there's very little delay when you prod the accelerator and there's so much torque on tap it pulls like a diesel when you need to dispatch a caravanner. Keen drivers are going to love the six-speed manual gearbox which features a very sweet, precise shift but the Powershift 'box is another thing again and makes all kinds of sense for urban drivers. The 1.0-litre engines sound great on paper but have frustrated owners by failing to get anywhere close to their published fuel economy figures. Regularly drive a fully-loaded C-MAX and you'll probably prefer the torque of the diesels.

Overall

The C-MAX wasn't the first MPV that drove well. Many of you will remember the original Honda Stream as a pretty sharp steer, but Ford has been able to position its design as the modern era keen driver's choice. At first, this might seem an odd thing to do. Surely sharp handling in an MPV is about as important a buying criterion as a supercar that can bring two wardrobes back from IKEA? Not so. For many buyers, an MPV is an admission that they've grown old and lost their mojo a bit. The C-MAX is the antidote to the usual pipe and slippers people mover. It's the car you'd take on the school run and find the long way home - and that's exactly why it's sold in such huge numbers. Therefore finding a used one shouldn't be difficult. There's little wrong with the petrol engines per se, but make no mistake, the C-MAX suits a diesel much better. If you can track down a well looked-after 2.0-litre diesel with the Powershift transmission, it's even less likely to disappoint.

Ford Grand C-MAX average rating: 4.5/5 (9 reviews)

- 13/06/2019, owner of a Ford Grand C-Max Titanium 1.5L EcoBoost 150PS 6 Speed Auto

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
The car is perfect for my needs. It's an absolute god send. I have the Grand C-Max as I need lots of space for trips out with the grand kids, space for shopping - which I do a lot. Also to carry my wheelchair around whenever I need it.

- 21/05/2019, owner of a Ford Grand C-Max Zetec Tdci

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
For some unknown reason I previously did not consider buying a Ford car. But after being familiarized with "Max" series and buying C-Max, I was pleasantly surprised. Very smooth, economical drive and if needed able to accelerate fast enough to get you out of trouble. Nice car. I, as well as my wife, are very happy with it.

- 13/04/2018, owner of a Ford Grand C-Max Zetec 1.0T EcoBoost 100PS 6 Speed

User rating: 4/5

User comment:
I bought this car because it was the only one I could find that allows me to put a wheelchair in without taking it apart.

Read all Ford Grand C-MAX Reviews