Land Rover Freelander 2.2 TD4 XS 5dr MeridianTM Sound System Heated front seats Diesel 4x4 (2014) available from Volvo Horsham

This vehicle is currently in stock at Land Rover Hatfield and can be purchased from Volvo Horsham.

01403 593 090

£16,000

WAS £18,000, SAVE £2,000

This car comes with: 6-speed manual transmission, Heated front seats, Front/rear Armrest Pack, Full size spare wheel, Halogen signature headlights, Power-fold, heated door mirrors, 6-way manual driver's seat, 4-way manual passenger seat, Meridian(TM) Sound System, Rain sensing windscreen wipers, Cruise control.

01/03/2014

31372

Manual

Diesel 45.6 combined MPG

SANTORINI BLACK



We pride ourselves in only providing cars of the highest of standards - all vehicles are taken through a pre-delivery inspection and are fully HPI checked for your peace of mind. We price our vehicles for sale on the basis of age, condition and mileage. The vehicles for sale may have previously been used for business or hire purposes and so may have had multiple users. Where we hold documents relating to vehicle history, these are available for inspection on request and we are happy to address any specific queries before you view or make an offer to purchase any vehicle.


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Emissions and Fuel

CO2:
165 g/km

MPG:
45.6

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* Price does not include road fund license

Body Glass

Electric front/rear windows, One shot lowering/closing on front windows, Rear wash/wipe

Brakes

ABS / hill descent control / electronic traction control, CBC - (Cornering brake control), DSC - Dynamic Stability Control, Electronic brake force distribution, Electronic parking brake, Emergency brake assist, Roll stability control

Chassis/Suspension

Terrain Response

Communication

Personal telephone integration system with bluetooth

Driver Aids

Cruise control, PAS, Rear parking aid

Driver Convenience

Stop/start button

Driver Information

Digital clock, Driver information module, Navigation system with TMC, Service interval indicator

Driving Mirrors

Electric adjustable/heated/folding door mirrors

Engine

Diesel particulate filter

Entertainment

Auxiliary Audio Jack, DAB Digital radio, Steering wheel mounted audio/cruise controls

Exterior Body Features

Jupiter grille/side vents

Exterior Lights

Automatic headlights + automatic windscreen wipers, Daytime running lights, LED headlamp signature

Heating/Cooling/Ventilation

Auxiliary heater, Pollen filter

Interior Features

12V power point front/rear, 12V power point in luggage area, Front armrests, Front centre console storage box, Luggage cover, Map pockets on front seats, Tilt/reach adjustable steering wheel

Packs

Clearview Pack - Freelander 2, Design pack - Freelander 2

Safety

5 x 3 point seatbelts, Drivers knee airbag, Dual stage Driver/Passenger Airbags, Front seatbelt pretensioners + load limiters, Front side airbags with curtain airbags

Seats

3 rear headrests, 60/40 split folding rear seat, Front head restraints, Heated front seats, Height adjustable driver's seat, Rear centre head restraint, Two rear outer seat isofix location points

Security

Locking wheel nuts, Perimeter alarm, Remote central locking/doors+fuel cap+tailgate, Robust passive engine immobilisation

Vanity Mirrors

Driver/passenger sunvisors and illuminated vanity mirrors

General

Badge Engine CC: 2.2
Badge Power: 150
Based On ID: N
Coin Description: TD4
Coin Series: XS
Generation Mark: 2
Insurance Group 1 - 50 Effective January 07: 24E
Man Corrosion Perforation Guarantee - Years: 6
Manufacturers Paintwork Guarantee - Years: 3
NCAP Adult Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Child Occupant Protection %: N
NCAP Front/Side Impact - Discontinued February 09: 9
NCAP Overall Rating - Effective February 09: N
NCAP Pedestrian - Discontinued February 09: 9
NCAP Pedestrian Protection %: N
NCAP Safety Assist %: N
Service Interval Frequency - Months: 12
Service Interval Mileage: 16000
Standard manufacturers warranty - Mileage: 999999
Standard manufacturers warranty - Years: 3
Timing Belt Interval Frequency - Months: 108
Timing Belt Interval Mileage: 144000
Vehicle Homologation Class: M1

Emissions - ICE

CO: 0.116
CO2 (g/km): 165
HC: N
HC+NOx: 0.174
Noise Level dB(A): 73
NOx: 0.153
Particles: 0
Standard Euro Emissions: EURO 5

Engine and Drive Train

Camshaft: DOHC
Catalytic Convertor: True
CC: 2179
Compression Ratio: 15.8:1
Cylinder Layout: IN-LINE
Cylinders: 4
Cylinders - Bore (mm): 85
Cylinders - Stroke (mm): 96
Engine Layout: FRONT TRANSVERSE
Fuel Delivery: COMMON RAIL
Gears: 6 SPEED
Number of Valves: 16
Transmission: MANUAL

Fuel Consumption - ICE

EC Combined (mpg): 45.6
EC Directive 1999/100/EC Applies: True
EC Extra Urban (mpg): 50.4
EC Urban (mpg): 38.2

Performance

0 to 60 mph (secs): True
0 to 62 mph (secs): 10.9
Engine Power - BHP: 150
Engine Power - KW: 110
Engine Power - PS: True
Engine Power - RPM: 4000
Engine Torque - LBS.FT: 310
Engine Torque - MKG: 43
Engine Torque - NM: 420
Engine Torque - RPM: 1750
Top Speed: 112

Tyres

Alloys?: True
Tyre Size Front: 235/65 R17
Tyre Size Rear: 235/65 R17
Tyre Size Spare: TYRE REPAIR KIT
Wheel Style: 5 Split Spoke
Wheel Type: 17" ALLOY

Vehicle Dimensions

Height: 1740
Height (including roof rails): 1830
Length: 4500
Wheelbase: 2660
Width: 1910
Width (including mirrors): 2195

Weight and Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity (Litres): 68
Gross Vehicle Weight: 2505
Luggage Capacity (Seats Down): 1670
Luggage Capacity (Seats Up): 755
Max. Loading Weight: 720
Max. Roof Load: 75
Max. Towing Weight - Braked: 2000
Max. Towing Weight - Unbraked: 750
Minimum Kerbweight: 1785
No. of Seats: 5
Turning Circle - Kerb to Kerb: 11.3

FREE. RADICAL. (used) 17/01/2014

By Andy Enright

Introduction

As a company, Land Rover might be better known around the world for its Defenders and Range Rover models, but there's no more accurate barometer to the health and strength of a company than its entry-level cars and for some years now, Land Rover's baby has been the Freelander 2. That it has become the benchmark against which all others are judged is testament to the success it has enjoyed. It's a model that's been continually improved as well, and the version we take a look at here is the 2011 model year car which was unveiled at the tail end of 2010 and lasted right through to its replacement by a version that was further facelifted and brought to market in August 2012.

Models

5dr Compact 4x4 (2.2-litre diesel [S, GS, XS, HSE])

History

The Land Rover Freelander 2 first went on sale in the UK in 2006, but such has been the pace, not only of development of the vehicle but the economic background in which it's been sold, that the Solihull brand had to work constantly to improve and tune its offering. Having survived the worst years of the credit crunch in 2008 and 2009, Land Rover was actually in reasonable shape during the period of sale of the car we look at here. In 2010, the Freelander 2 led an increase in company sales, with new registrations up nearly 40 per cent on the previous year - primarily thanks to the small but significant upgrades made to the version we're going to look at here, produced between 2010 and 2012.

What You Get

At the front where the door mirrors are 10% bigger, there's a sleeker bumper assembly incorporating restyled front fog lamp bezels and revised Halogen projector headlamps flanking a smarter front grille that's darkly painted on TD4 models but more brightly finished on plusher SD4 variants. At the back, there are revised rear tail lamps either side of a bright full width trimmed strip. Rear seat accommodation is miles better than was offered by the first generation Freelander, but it's still only average by the standards of the current compact SUV sector and three burly adults would certainly be a squash across the back seat on anything other than shorter journeys. Still, that's also true of most rivals. There is decent luggage room - between 755 and 1670-litres, depending on whether you're using the rear seats which fold down neatly. It's a pity the rear window glass doesn't open so you could chuck in small bags without lifting the tailgate but there's a long flat load bay, plus there's a retractable luggage blind.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

The Freelander used to have a distinctly second rate reliability record, but the Freelander 2 has improved things by leaps and bounds. Check if a tow bar has been fitted and also check the tyres for odd wear patterns. Although the Freelander 2 is very capable off road, there are limits to its ground clearance so inspect the underside for signs of damage to the suspension, exhaust and front valance. The diesel engine is a tough unit and if you're test driving the car on a cold day, don't be afraid if the Stop/Start system fails to kick in. The engine is programmed to keep running at temperatures below three degrees Celsius. The lower dash plastics can scratch easily and make sure the glove box hinges are still in requisite order.

Replacement Parts

(based on 2011 Freelander TD4 - approx excl. VAT) Mirror glass retails at £20 for the flat panel and £25 for convex glass. Tail light bulbs are just 29p a pop, and a lamp assembly for the rear number plate is £10. An auxiliary drive belt is £15 and oil and air filter elements are £7 and £6 respectively.

On the Road

This SUV's commanding driving position is one reason why so many like it, your perch offering a fine view out over the flat, square-edged bonnet. Beneath that, all models get an upgraded version of the familiar Peugeot/Citroen-derived 2.2-litre turbodiesel, featuring a hefty 420Nm of torque - 20Nm up on before, so pulling power is plentiful enough to allow for a useful 2,000kg braked towing weight. It's a unit offered in 150PS form to TD4 customers (who can choose either 6-speed manual or automatic transmission) or with 190PS in the top SD4 guise that comes with an auto gearbox only. Even so, this version is still able to significantly reduce the 0-60mph TD4 sprint time from 10.9s to 8.7s and raise the maximum speed from 112 to 118mph. It's the TD4 Freelander that most will choose though and here, there's an option was once quite unthinkable in any Land Rover product: 2WD. With 23% of the European compact SUV segment now based around 2WD models, this wasn't an area of the market that Land Rover could continue to ignore, especially as incorporating it enabled the Freelander to take on Qashqai-class Crossover pretend 4x4s as well as RAV4 and CR-V-sector soft roading compact SUVs. But isn't buying one of these without all-wheel drive rather defeating the point? Land Rover says not, pointing out that their 2WD Freelander eD4 has the same underbody protection, sump guard and great ground clearance as the 4WD model. With a set of winter tyres fitted, you might not even notice any difference in a cold snap. Most buyers though, will understandably continue to want the usual full-time intelligent 4x4 set-up that, as ever, is based around a sophisticated Haldex centre differential that channels drive mainly to the front wheels but can direct it rearwards as and when needed. All but entry-level 4WD variants got Land Rover's excellent Terrain Response system which, via a rotary knob on the dashboard, allows the driver to select a drive programme to match the sort of off-road conditions the car is experiencing. The settings are 'normal', 'grass/gravel/snow', 'mud/ruts' and 'sand' and once you've chosen one, the car's electronics work out how best to dole out power and maximise traction, turning the Freelander 2 into a far more capable off-road tool. A nice touch is a display panel with a diagram showing the front wheels' steering angle, useful if you've become disorientated on a seriously muddy track. There's still no low range transfer case, which may scrub this Land Rover from the shortlists of those who want something really rough and ready, but it's still true to say that no other car in this class can get close to this one's off road abilities. Ground clearance is 210mm, one reason why it can wade through over half a metre of water, while the 31-degree approach angle, the 23-degree breakover angle and the 34-degree departure angle are all excellent. If you are going to be testing that out, then you'll be glad of the sophisticated Gradient Release Control system, a logical extension of the old Hill Descent Control system for descending steep and slippery slopes.

Overall

Choosing a Land Rover Freelander 2 really shouldn't be a tough decision. If you want a small 4x4 that can cut the mustard off-road, look no further. The Freelander 2 we saw between 2010 and 2012 added more strings to the bow of this practical design though. The addition of a controversial front-wheel drive model broadened the range and allowed some customers who didn't think they could afford a new Land Rover to join the party. Then there was the extra power and luxury of the top SD variant that enabled this car to take the fight towards plusher compact SUVs like Audi's Q5 and BMW's X3. Both 2WD and top SD Freelanders make great used buys as you can be fairly sure the cars haven't been put through the wringer off road. Go for a mainstream TD4 4WD version and you'll find that there's a good deal of used stock on the market, so if you really want to get the best prices, you'll need to negotiate hard and don't be afraid to walk away.

THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE (used) 31/01/2011

By Jonathan Crouch

Introduction

The Freelander 2 is the compact 4x4 we all knew Land Rover had the capacity to build. Whereas its predecessor's spread of talents was distinctly patchy, the Freelander 2 offered superior build quality, sleeker styling and even better off-road potential. It was also a car that improved quite significantly over the course of its life and the models we look at here are those built from 2008 through to the 2011 model year facelift that arrived in dealerships at the end of 2010.

Models

5dr Compact 4x4 (2.2-litre diesel [S, GS, XS, HSE])

History

By the time 2008 rolled round, the Land Rover Freelander 2 had already earned its reputation as the classiest compact 4x4 around. Now contributing to rather than living off the Land Rover brand, the Freelander nevertheless found itself looking down the barrel of the credit crunch with buyers keeping what money they had under lock and key while nervous banks refused to extend lines of credit to anybody without an impeccable credit score and some serious collateral to back it up with. In other words the market for smart 4x4s virtually evaporated overnight. Remedial action was required. The first and most obvious change was to can the slow-selling, thirsty and expensive 3.2-litre petrol engined cars. An environmental and austerity pitch couldn't be taken seriously when there was a 232bhp slugger in the line up that managed 25mpg and spouted 265g/km of carbon dioxide. Land Rover decided that an all-diesel line up was the way forward and reinforced the message by introducing the TD4_e, a model that reduced the diesel engine's CO2 from 194 to 179g/km and featured a Stop/Start system that cuts the engine when the car is stationary - a first in the SUV sector. This Stop/Start technology was rolled out to all manual models in 2009.

What You Get

If you're thinking of graduating to this Freelander 2 from an original Freelander, you're in for a treat. It's fully 50mm longer, 109mm wider and 32mm taller and the wheels were shifted further towards each corner, freeing up another 105mm in the car's wheelbase, making rear seat accommodation a whole lot better and improving off-road ability into the deal. The kerb weight crept up to over 1,900kg in the process but a parallel improvement in safety and refinement is a transaction most customers will be willing to accept. Quality-wise, the interior is a somewhat unusual mix of very high quality materials with some surprisingly cheap plastics. It's better than you'd expect in a mainstream compact 4x4 but perhaps not quite of the standard you'd find in the Freelander's premium-badged German rivals. There are four trim levels offered: S, GS, XS and HSE. The S model misses out quite badly in not being fitted with the amazing Terrain Response system, so I'd be tempted to walk on by. The Freelander feels a classier and more sophisticated proposition than compact 4x4s such as Nissan's X-Trail, Toyota's RAV4 and Honda's CR-V. By the same token, though, its genuine off-road prowess and Land Rover badge mean you're far more likely to see a mud-splattered Freelander than a premium compact SUV like the BMW X1 or Audi's Q5 with soiled alloys. The Freelander's mix of quality and honest practicality set it apart and the latest cars add greater efficiency into that rare mix. You'll need a manual TD4_e model to take advantage of low emissions and superior fuel economy. By contrast, the automatic model looks increasingly outmoded.

What You Pay

Refer to Car & Driving for an exact up-to-date valuation section. Click here and we will email it to you.

What to Look For

The Freelander used to have a distinctly second rate reliability record, but the Freelander 2 has improved things hand over fist. Check if a tow bar has been fitted and also check the tyres for odd wear patterns. Although the Freelander 2 is very capable off road, there are limits to its ground clearance so inspect the underside for signs of damage to the suspension, exhaust and front valance. The diesel engine is a tough unit and if you're test driving the car on a cold day, don't be afraid if the Stop/Start system fails to kick in. The engine is programmed to keep running at temperatures below three degrees Celsius. The lower dash plastics can scratch easily and make sure the glove box hinges are still in requisite order.

Replacement Parts

(Based on 2009 Freelander TD4 - approx excl. VAT). Mirror glass retails at £20 for the flat panel and £25 for convex glass. Tail light bulbs are just 29p a pop, and a lamp assembly for the rear number plate is £10. An auxiliary drive belt is £15 and oil and air filter elements are £7 and £6 respectively.

On the Road

This Freelander 2 is very much a tale of two gearboxes. The manual model gets the Start/Stop system and returns superior economy and less carbon emissions. The automatic version, well, it doesn't. The buying decision ought to be fairly cut and dried in that case and while we'd still counsel you to go for the manual model, there remains the inescapable fact that the automatic is just nicer to drive. Decisions, decisions. Assuming that you have chosen the manual car, you'll get from zero to 60mph in a middling 10.7 seconds on the way to a top speed of 112mph, so it's doubtful you're going to win any drag races. Body control through corners is way better than in the old Freelander, though, and this Freelander 2 is a car from which you can derive some enjoyment on a challenging section of road. It's off road that the magic is revealed, and only once you've taken your Freelander 2 off road (ideally under the initial auspices of people who know what they're doing) that you'll marvel at how well Land Rover has integrated that ability and enabled it to work with what are often the conflicting demands of road driving. The Terrain Response system allows the driver to select what sort of off-road conditions the car has to tackle via a rotary knob on the dashboard and the car's electronics work out how best to apportion power and maximise traction. There's still no low range transfer case, but you do get a sophisticated Gradient Release Control system which offers a logical extension of the much-imitated Hill Descent Control system for descending very steep inclines.

Overall

If you're in the market for a compact 4x4 that can cut it off-road and yet which offers a civilised on-road performance, stop right here. Your shortlist need only run to this Land Rover Freelander 2. There may be other rivals that handle a little better on the black top, but for a truly versatile vehicle, nothing can top this Freelander 2. The used market is quite vibrant at the moment, and while it's hard to find genuine bargains, you should still be able to find solid value for money. The best buy is probably a low mileage manual GS model with a fully stamped-up service book but it's hard to go too far wrong with this generation Freelander.

Land Rover Freelander average rating: 4.5/5 (3 reviews)

Mrs Stephanie Smart - 21/11/2018, owner of a Land Rover Freelander 2 2.2 Td4 XS 5dr

User rating: 4.5/5

User comment:
Very happy with my Freelander so far, the gadgets it comes with make the whole driving experience so much easier.

Mr Andrew Owen - 17/08/2016, owner of a Land Rover Freelander 2 2.2 SD4 HSE 2014

User rating: 4/5

User comment:
3 weeks and over 2,000 miles we are still enjoying the ride. Looks great, comfortable for driver and passengers, eats the miles, whatever the road type, and makes the endless London speed humps bearable. Only negatives are mpg and the sat nav is not quite a match for GoogleMaps.

Mr Andrew Nunes - 05/07/2016, owner of a Land Rover Freelander Gs Td4 Auto

User rating: 5/5

User comment:
It's only when you take to the wheel of a Freelander2 that you can begin to full understand what a great 4x4 it is to drive. The high seating position is one of my favourite likes, along with the look of the vehicle when parked. I just wish the Land Rover Dealerships would allow upgrading of the front windscreen to a heated version.


Specifications of used vehicles may vary. The information displayed conveys the usual specification of the most recent model but may not reflect the individual vehicle. Please contact the sales department for confirmation in the first instance.

Mileages on used vehicles may vary. Please contact the sales department for confirmation in the first instance.